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BUSINESS
February 16, 2006 | By Tim Johnson INQUIRER FOREIGN STAFF
When tensions mount at the baccarat tables in Macau, gamblers don't reach for a stiff drink. They quaff hot green tea, and instead of cocktail waitresses, some casinos have "tea boys. " "You find that the customers don't really drink alcohol," said Buddy Lam, a spokesman for the Sands Macau, a U.S.-operated casino with 438 tables here. That is one of the many differences between gamblers in China and elsewhere. Chinese gamblers love baccarat, a card game in which players bet against a dealer, but they are not fond of slot machines.
NEWS
July 2, 1987 | By George Anastasia, Inquirer Staff Writer
An alleged member of an international gambling ring pleaded not guilty yesterday to conspiracy, theft and swindling charges after his indictment in what state officials say is the biggest cheating scam yet uncovered at an Atlantic City casino. Poon King-Chung, 40, of Foster City, Calif., entered the plea during an arraignment before Superior Court Judge John B. Mariano. Mariano set bail at $500,000 for Poon, also known as Albert King-Chung, after Deputy Attorney General Samuel Reale asked for that bail figure in order to reduce the risk that Poon might flee the country if released.
NEWS
May 25, 2010
The Pennsylvania Gaming Control Board has unanimously approved table games for the SugarHouse Casino, set to open this September on North Delaware Avenue at a site straddling the Fishtown and Northern Liberties sections of the city. The seven-man board gave SugarHouse the green light on Tuesday to add 40 games, including blackjack, craps, roulette, baccarat and three types of poker. It also will have 1,602 slot machines. SugarHouse, which will be Philadelphia's first casino, expects to hire 800 employees, including 300 to operate the table games.
NEWS
January 8, 1992 | By David Johnston, Inquirer Staff Writer
One of the five highest high rollers in the world - a Japanese gambler who boldly bet at the rate of $14 million an hour in casinos from Atlantic City to Australia - has been killed. Akio Kashiwagi, 54, was found in his palatial home near the foot of Mount Fuji by his wife, Mieko, when she returned home Friday night, the Japanese government said yesterday. His face and neck had been hacked, apparently with an ancient samurai sword, the newspaper Yomiuri Shimbun reported. Police said they have no suspects.
NEWS
December 31, 1989 | By David Johnston, Inquirer Staff Writer
By the time the casinos close out 1989 at 4 a.m. tomorrow, gamblers will have pumped more than $13 billion into one-armed bandits and bought nearly $7.7 billion worth of chips to wager at the felt tables, both annual records. Preliminary figures indicate that the players will lose more than $2.8 billion of this stake, about 3 percent more than in 1988. That is a loss of about $93 for each of the more than 30 million visitors who go to Atlantic City annually, up from about $90 in 1988.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 23, 1990 | By Barbara Beck, Daily News Staff Writer
Omar Sharif, once the heartthrob of the Western world, is returning to America to play one of his favorite roles. This weekend, the 57-year-old Sharif - who once plodded through miles of snow to get to Julie Christie with his face caked and glistening with ice - is hosting a three-day, $300,000 baccarat tournament at the Showboat Hotel & Casino in Atlantic City. That means he'll spend his time meeting and greeting the players, wishing them luck and generally schmoozing with the Showboat crowd.
BUSINESS
March 13, 1993 | By William H. Sokolic, FOR THE INQUIRER
Peter Thomas Reintjes considers himself an avid gambler, at home at a blackjack table, roulette wheel or in a baccarat pit. And with more than a dozen casinos close to his Hamburg, Germany, home, he certainly has his choice of gaming halls. But this weekend, he's testing his luck in a faraway place - Atlantic City. "Casinos in Germany can't compete with those here," says 35-year-old Reintjes, effusing about the size and spaciousness of Boardwalk towers such as Trump Taj Mahal Casino Resort, his host for five days of gambling.
NEWS
September 2, 1991 | By Karen Petersen, Special to The Inquirer
Pai gow and sic bo will be staples in this town before long, but they're not something you'll find on a Chinese menu. Eagerly awaited by Atlantic City casinos since Gov. Florio agreed to allow them in New Jersey, pai gow and sic bo are games with a history that goes back more than 1,000 years and with a special appeal to Asian gamblers. By offering such games, the casinos hope to cash in on the Asian market and boost table-game revenues, which declined more than $400 million in the first half of 1991.
NEWS
December 13, 1989 | By David Johnston, Inquirer Staff Writer
During the first full week of December there was a big winner at the gambling tables in Atlantic City. But it wasn't the 11 casinos and it wasn't their players. It was Steve Wynn, and he wasn't even in town. The amount of money bet at Atlantic City's gaming tables plummeted nearly 16 percent - it was down almost 38 percent at one casino - the week of Dec. 3-9 compared with the same Sunday-through-Saturday period a year earlier. What caused the sharp decline? Was it the snow that blanketed the East Coast on Friday?
NEWS
August 16, 1988 | By George Anastasia, Inquirer Staff Writer
New Jersey authorities are negotiating an agreement that would result in all criminal charges being dropped against Albert Poon, a reputed international card cheat and central figure in an alleged $2.7 million casino baccarat scam, in exchange for the payment of about $215,000. Poon, 41, was scheduled to go on trial here yesterday, but in a mixup between the New Jersey Attorney General's Office and the Immigration and Naturalization Service (INS), he left the country May 27 after he was ordered deported and has been barred from re-entering the country.
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NEWS
March 1, 2013
In another bid to bolster Atlantic City casinos' fading fortunes, New Jersey lawmakers and Gov. Christie are making it possible for more gamblers to lose their shirts - even while they're not wearing one. The launch of Internet gambling sponsored by the Shore casinos puts the state, along with Delaware and Nevada, on what will likely be the nation's next frontier of state-sanctioned gambling. While Christie and Trenton lawmakers are right to search for new winning combinations for the state's casino industry, it's anything but clear that letting people gamble in their pajamas, or even less, is what Atlantic City needs.
NEWS
September 5, 2012 | BY JASON NARK, Daily News Staff Writer
It's not too often a casino offers up $1 million and not one person shows up to snatch it. But in the most bizarre mini baccarat game Atlantic City's ever seen, nothing's what it seems. The group of disgruntled gamblers holding on to $977,000 in uncashed chips has doubled down, because the Golden Nugget's offer came with stipulations. Now the casino's sticking with its original intention - to get the chips and paid-out cash back. "I wanted to resolve this matter and put it behind us," Tilman Fertitta, the Texas billionaire who owns the Golden Nugget said in a statement Wednesday.
NEWS
May 25, 2010
The Pennsylvania Gaming Control Board has unanimously approved table games for the SugarHouse Casino, set to open this September on North Delaware Avenue at a site straddling the Fishtown and Northern Liberties sections of the city. The seven-man board gave SugarHouse the green light on Tuesday to add 40 games, including blackjack, craps, roulette, baccarat and three types of poker. It also will have 1,602 slot machines. SugarHouse, which will be Philadelphia's first casino, expects to hire 800 employees, including 300 to operate the table games.
LIVING
May 14, 2010 | By David Iams FOR THE INQUIRER
Paperweights remain a popular collectible although they may have lost their purpose as the papers they once prevented from scattering have given way to other media. And paperweights are still being made today locally as well as far and wide. South Jersey boasts not only a glassblowing facility at the WheatonArts and Cultural Center in Millville (formerly Wheaton Village) where visitors can make their own, it also is home to one of the country's best-known glass artists, Paul J. Stankard.
BUSINESS
February 16, 2006 | By Tim Johnson INQUIRER FOREIGN STAFF
When tensions mount at the baccarat tables in Macau, gamblers don't reach for a stiff drink. They quaff hot green tea, and instead of cocktail waitresses, some casinos have "tea boys. " "You find that the customers don't really drink alcohol," said Buddy Lam, a spokesman for the Sands Macau, a U.S.-operated casino with 438 tables here. That is one of the many differences between gamblers in China and elsewhere. Chinese gamblers love baccarat, a card game in which players bet against a dealer, but they are not fond of slot machines.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 22, 1998 | By Robert Strauss, FOR THE INQUIRER
Twenty years ago, floods of gamblers lined up for blocks along the Boardwalk simply to get into Atlantic City's first legal casino. These days, it takes a bit more to lure them through the doors. At the Tropicana, the plan is to revive nickel slot machines, while at the Atlantic City Hilton, there is a clear upscale move to push baccarat. The Trump Marina is looking for baby-boom gamblers, while its sister hotel, Trump's Taj Mahal, has carved out a niche as the premier poker house on the Boardwalk.
BUSINESS
March 13, 1993 | By William H. Sokolic, FOR THE INQUIRER
Peter Thomas Reintjes considers himself an avid gambler, at home at a blackjack table, roulette wheel or in a baccarat pit. And with more than a dozen casinos close to his Hamburg, Germany, home, he certainly has his choice of gaming halls. But this weekend, he's testing his luck in a faraway place - Atlantic City. "Casinos in Germany can't compete with those here," says 35-year-old Reintjes, effusing about the size and spaciousness of Boardwalk towers such as Trump Taj Mahal Casino Resort, his host for five days of gambling.
SPORTS
December 24, 1992 | by Paul Hagen, Daily News Sports Writer
Spring training doesn't open for a couple months, but Phillies centerfielder Lenny Dykstra already is playing defense. An article in the January edition of Philadelphia magazine portrays Dykstra in unflattering terms, alleges that he cursed loudly and had to be restrained from attacking another casino customer while losing $50,000 playing baccarat early one morning this offseason in Atlantic City. Dykstra, who has never claimed to be a choirboy, defiantly dismissed the story, which is due on newsstands Monday.
NEWS
January 8, 1992 | By David Johnston, Inquirer Staff Writer
One of the five highest high rollers in the world - a Japanese gambler who boldly bet at the rate of $14 million an hour in casinos from Atlantic City to Australia - has been killed. Akio Kashiwagi, 54, was found in his palatial home near the foot of Mount Fuji by his wife, Mieko, when she returned home Friday night, the Japanese government said yesterday. His face and neck had been hacked, apparently with an ancient samurai sword, the newspaper Yomiuri Shimbun reported. Police said they have no suspects.
NEWS
September 2, 1991 | By Karen Petersen, Special to The Inquirer
Pai gow and sic bo will be staples in this town before long, but they're not something you'll find on a Chinese menu. Eagerly awaited by Atlantic City casinos since Gov. Florio agreed to allow them in New Jersey, pai gow and sic bo are games with a history that goes back more than 1,000 years and with a special appeal to Asian gamblers. By offering such games, the casinos hope to cash in on the Asian market and boost table-game revenues, which declined more than $400 million in the first half of 1991.
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