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NEWS
August 15, 1990 | By Dave Racher, Daily News Staff Writer
By next April, judges will be able to take their vacations early, joked District Attorney Ronald D. Castille. The DA said that based on the number of guilty pleas by criminals charged with committing felonies during the first six months of the year, there will be a "zero" backlog of cases by next spring. By the end of the year, the number of felony cases awaiting trials will be down to an unprecedented 4,900, Castille said yesterday during a news conference with judges and other criminal justice system officials.
NEWS
March 16, 1989 | By Joseph Grace, Daily News Staff Writer
The city's judicial system is choking on backlogged cases, District Attorney Ronald D. Castille said yesterday, and he urged Mayor Goode to build a courthouse in Center City and to renegotiate a court-ordered cap on prison inmates. "The system is headed for pretty much of a crisis unless we take some drastic steps," Castille said yesterday at a City Hall news conference. "We're looking at a backlog that's going to be astounding. " Castille said the system's backlog of felony cases was about 11,000 at the end of 1988 and is projected to grow to more than 14,000 by the end of this year.
NEWS
May 19, 1987 | By Gilbert M. Gaul, Inquirer Staff Writer
A huge backlog of claims to Blue Cross of Greater Philadelphia for major- medical insurance payments has been slashed to a near-normal level. The backlog is down to about 11,000 claims from a high of more than 60,000 in January. A spokesman said the insurer's processing schedule was expected to be back to normal by June. "I fully believe in two weeks we'll have it down to 8,000 or less . . . a level that's normal for this time of year," James R. Vivian, director of the major-medical section, said in an interview last Friday.
NEWS
December 14, 1986 | By Rich Henson, Inquirer Staff Writer (Correspondent Phyllis Holtzman also contributed to this article)
Alfred Zollers is a matchmaker and, at first glance, his job would seem rather easy. When a criminal case comes into the Mongtgomery County Common Pleas Court, Zollers, the district attorney's chief clerk, simply makes certain that the case is assigned to a judge. One case, one judge. Piece of cake. Except that lately, the pieces haven't been fitting so nicely. Instead, Zollers said he has found that the county's growing backlog of criminal cases is making it more and more difficult for him to match a case with a judge.
NEWS
January 23, 1992 | By Bryon Kurzenabe, SPECIAL TO THE INQUIRER
Burlington County's newest Superior Court judges will have to look backward to move forward in their new jobs. Next month, after each is sworn in to his seven-year post, John Sweeney and Jan Schlesinger will encounter the remnants of a period when too few judges grappled with too many cases: Backlog. Court records show that 3,740 of the 13,915 cases pending from July through October have exhausted the prescribed time limits for when a case should be heard - constituting a backlog of 27 percent.
NEWS
February 23, 1995 | by Paul Maryniak, Daily News Staff Writer
If you bought or sold a house in Philadelphia during the last year or so and it seems as if you've been waiting an eternity for the city to record the deed or mortgage, you aren't dreaming. The city controller's office says you're caught up in a whopping backlog that's costing taxpayers an indeterminable sum of money. In an audit released yesterday, City Controller Jonathan Saidel disclosed that the city Department of Records at one point had failed to enter 30,000 deeds, mortgages and related documents into its official data base.
NEWS
May 30, 2014 | BY PATRICIA MADEJ, Daily News Staff Writer madejp@phillynews.com, 215-854-5938
A PLAN INTRODUCED in the U.S. Senate in March offers solutions to the backlog problem plaguing Veterans Administration hospitals, Sen. Bob Casey said yesterday. At a news conference at 30th Street Station, Casey discussed a three-step initiative in his proposed 21st Century Veterans Benefits Delivery Act, more than a month after VA hospitals were found to have long wait times, falsified wait lists and extreme backlogs. Casey said that the national wait time to file a claim is 244 days, while the average in Philadelphia is 295 days.
NEWS
June 23, 1988 | By Christopher Hand, Special to The Inquirer
The Gloucester County Utilities Authority, apparently rebounding from the sludge-disposal problems that plagued it this spring, has again started accepting septic waste from haulers outside Gloucester County. Gary Whalen, operations manager for the authority, said last night that the backlog of sewage that had accumulated at the treatment plant last month - at one point almost three million gallons - had now been almost completely removed. For the last month, the authority has refused to accept septic waste from outside the county.
NEWS
January 19, 2011 | By DAVID GAMBACORTA & STEPHANIE FARR, gambacd@phillynews.com 215-854-5994
The Pennsylvania State Police isn't shying away from the truth: It has a massive backlog of criminal DNA evidence that could solve an untold number of crimes. It's a problem with far-reaching ramifications, as evidenced by the case of Antonio Rodriguez, who police sources said confessed yesterday to being the murderous Kensington Strangler. A sample of Rodriguez's DNA was provided to the State Police on Oct. 25 - a week before the first of the Strangler's victims was found - but was not uploaded into the national CODIS database until Jan. 10, said Jack Lewis, a State Police spokesman.
NEWS
December 19, 1987 | By Rich Heidorn Jr., Inquirer Staff Writer
The Camden County Probation Department says it has virtually eliminated the backlog that delayed the delivery of thousands of child-support checks earlier this month. Bob Fisler, supervisor of the department's domestic relations division, said yesterday that the division had returned to the four- to five-day "turnaround" time - the time it takes to issue a check to the children after receiving payment from the father - that was the norm before the backlog. "We're getting up to speed," Fisler said.
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NEWS
April 22, 2015 | By Andrew Seidman, Inquirer Trenton Bureau
New Jersey lawmakers on Monday scrutinized the state's handling of thousands of low-income residents' Medicaid applications, as the Christie administration asserted it had made progress in reducing the backlog. Gov. Christie expanded Medicaid under the Affordable Care Act, and 400,000 residents have gained health insurance through the government program since 2014. However, thousands of applications have languished at understaffed county welfare agencies, in part because of the state's antiquated computer systems.
NEWS
April 15, 2015 | By Tricia L. Nadolny, Inquirer Staff Writer
More than 30,000 inquiries sent to Philadelphia's Veterans Affairs benefits office were left to languish, on average for almost a year, according to an internal investigation. That finding was one of several outlined in a searing report released Wednesday by the VA's Inspector General. During their 10-month probe, investigators also confirmed data manipulation, poor working conditions and shoddy-record keeping. "We substantiated serious issues involving mismanagement and distrust of [office]
NEWS
February 17, 2015 | By Michael Matza, Inquirer Staff Writer
  Villanova University law professor Michele Pistone sensed the growing problem in the nation's asylum system even before new data released this month presented a stark picture of the backlog. "For 15 years, I could count on getting appointments for [asylum] interviews" promptly at the regional office in Newark, N.J., she said. "Students could start a [client's] case and have it adjudicated by the end of the semester. "This year, for the first time, that's not happening," she said, and appointments her students requested in September still have no interview dates.
NEWS
December 30, 2014 | By Andrew Seidman and Maddie Hanna, Inquirer Trenton Bureau
Since New Jersey expanded Medicaid under the Affordable Care Act, its efforts to enroll thousands of low-income residents have been hampered by low staffing and antiquated technology. Gov. Christie championed the expansion, and, indeed, 300,000 New Jersey adults have enrolled in Medicaid, the federal program for the poor and disabled, since President Obama's health-care law took effect in October 2013. Many gained coverage directly through online state and federal portals. Yet an estimated 11,000 others, whom experts describe as some of the state's most vulnerable citizens, have received no response to their applications.
NEWS
December 10, 2014 | BY MENSAH M. DEAN, Daily News Staff Writer deanm@phillynews.com, 215-568-8278
PHILADELPHIA has a problem with too many unwanted and overgrown trees, which could prove hazardous to people, a City Council committee was told yesterday. Due to budget constraints, there is a backlog of 3,161 tree-removal requests and a backlog of 9,796 requests for tree pruning, Parks and Recreation Commissioner Michael DiBerardinis said during an information hearing convened by Council's Committee on Parks, Recreation and Cultural Affairs. "The facts are, we are behind," said DiBerardinis, who laid the blame on the department's inadequate budget.
NEWS
August 26, 2014 | By Ben Finley, Inquirer Staff Writer
In May, police in Falls Township, Bucks County, pulled over Corey Sean Mcgrogan after getting a call about an intoxicated driver on West Trenton Avenue. Officers searched Mcgrogan's jeep and allegedly found a crack pipe, a syringe with suspected heroin residue, and 20 pills of what appeared to be Xanax, the prescription anxiety medication. Mcgrogan, 35, was charged with misdemeanor counts of drug possession and paraphernalia as well as careless driving. Three months later, he's still waiting for a district judge to review his case and decide if it should go to trial.
NEWS
August 8, 2014 | By Kathy Boccella, Inquirer Staff Writer
It's been nearly two years since the new Phoenixville Area Middle School opened its doors with an oversize auditorium featuring state-of-the-art acoustics; high-tech "Smart Boards" in front of every classroom; a large courtyard; and an impressive library. The $56 million Chester County public school is missing only one thing: money that Harrisburg promised to help defray the cost. "We show it as a receivable in the belief that at some point we will get what we are owed by the state," said Stan Johnson, Phoenixville Area School District executive director of operations.
NEWS
May 30, 2014 | BY PATRICIA MADEJ, Daily News Staff Writer madejp@phillynews.com, 215-854-5938
A PLAN INTRODUCED in the U.S. Senate in March offers solutions to the backlog problem plaguing Veterans Administration hospitals, Sen. Bob Casey said yesterday. At a news conference at 30th Street Station, Casey discussed a three-step initiative in his proposed 21st Century Veterans Benefits Delivery Act, more than a month after VA hospitals were found to have long wait times, falsified wait lists and extreme backlogs. Casey said that the national wait time to file a claim is 244 days, while the average in Philadelphia is 295 days.
NEWS
February 20, 2014 | By Michael Matza, Inquirer Staff Writer
Across a brightly lit room, three dozen immigrants sit shoulder-to-shoulder on three pew-like benches. Many look scared. Some murmur in Spanish, Arabic, Russian, and Haitian Creole. There is no bailiff; none but the judge to maintain order, call the cases, and render judgments, DIY-style. Lawyers waiting for clients' cases to be called pile up outside the four small courtrooms in the cramped corridor that one translator calls the "Hall of Anxiety. " With a backlog of 4,901 cases, Philadelphia's Immigration Court, housed on the fifth floor of a federal building in Center City, is chronically overburdened and thinly staffed, and reflects the workload crisis afflicting the nation's 57 other immigration courts.
NEWS
November 12, 2013
TODAY is the Veterans Day holiday. But if today is typical in all other respects, 22 American veterans will commit suicide. That brutal reality - 22 veteran suicides a day, according to the Department of Veterans Affairs - is driven not just by what our vets are asked to withstand on the battlefield, but by our treatment of them once they come home. In fact, Veterans Day seems increasingly to have become the day we take stock of our failing of our veterans, rather than a day to honor them.
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