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NEWS
May 1, 1995 | By Tom Avril, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Hill v. Gist, Docket No. L-1953-89; Allen v. Roberts, Docket No. L-1543-91; Mendez v. Jones, Docket No. L-1585-89: Each is at least an inch thick, crammed with briefs, Post-it notes, and memos scrawled in pencil by a judge. One deals with a car accident that took place when Ronald Reagan was President. Another has been scheduled for trial 12 times, only to be postponed again and again. They are part of a steadily growing backlog of Superior Court civil cases in Burlington County, the second worst such backlog in New Jersey's 21 counties.
BUSINESS
August 27, 2003 | By Bob Fernandez INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Toll Bros. Inc., which sells homes in 185 subdivisions throughout the United States, said yesterday that the market for expensive new homes was strong in the third quarter as profit, sales and backlog surged to record levels. Toll Bros., based in Huntingdon Valley, also said that over the last 16 weeks, potential buyers had placed an unusually high number of deposits on homes to be built in its subdivisions. This "should yield record results in 2004," Toll Bros. said. The home builder's earnings for the quarter ended July 31 rose 27.5 percent to $68.2 million from $53.5 million in the same quarter a year ago. On a per-share basis, the company earned 90 cents for the quarter, compared with 70 cents a year ago. Revenue rose to $693 million from $580.
NEWS
August 27, 1994 | By Robert Moran, INQUIRER HARRISBURG BUREAU
Despite cries of foul from State Auditor General Barbara Hafer, Gov. Casey's budget office yesterday released the final report of a critical performance audit of Hafer's department. Earlier this month, Hafer fired a round of complaint letters to state and national accountancy boards, alleging misconduct by Coopers & Lybrand, the firm commissioned by the governor's budget office to conduct the audit. Although the budget office highlighted the critical audit findings, Hafer was generally cautious in her reaction.
NEWS
September 15, 2000 | By Eugene Kiely, INQUIRER TRENTON BUREAU
As part of an agency-wide review, the New Jersey Parole Board has demoted a top official and will overhaul a two-year-old investigation unit that critics say contributed to the board's huge backlog of parole cases. Meanwhile, negotiations to settle a class-action suit brought by inmates over the backlog have hit a snag, the lawyer for the inmates said yesterday. Jule Dolci, the agency's director of operations for the past two years, was assigned to Northern State Prison in Newark last week, acting executive director Ken Connolly confirmed yesterday.
NEWS
February 15, 2012 | BY STEPHANIE FARR, farrs@phillynews.com 215-854-4225
IN THE EIGHT months since armed robbers first burst into the TriStar Market, in Yeadon, store owner Patel Bharat has turned his counter and sandwich station into a $15,000 bulletproof glass cage. Yet the State Police's Bureau of Forensic Services still hasn't processed three pieces of evidence - a gun, clothing and gloves - that were left behind at the scene and may hold the DNA clues to solving the case. In the meantime, Bharat's store has been robbed twice more at gunpoint, including less than a month after the first robbery - and by the same two men, he believes.
NEWS
March 7, 1994 | By Jeff Gelles and Richard Jones, INQUIRER STAFF WRITERS
Trash will be collected on a normal schedule throughout Philadelphia this week, city officials said yesterday. At the same time, sanitation crews will continue to work overtime to try to clean up the backlog left over on many neighborhood streets. "We're generally behind across the city," said Clarena I.W. Tolson, deputy streets commissioner. Tolson was acknowledging a fact that city residents have been living with through this winter's succession of storms and thaws: Trash collection has been erratic.
NEWS
June 8, 1993 | By Vanessa Williams, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Rickety bridges, broken signs and leaking roofs have cost Philadelphia millions in extra rehabilitation costs and lawsuits because the city has no regular maintenance program for its structures and facilities, according to a study released yesterday by the city controller. Jonathan A. Saidel, the city controller, estimated that the backlog of needed maintenance would equal $24 million, or 1.1 million hours of work. During the last two years, he noted, the Recreation Department has paid about $2.5 million to settle lawsuits brought by people injured at playgrounds, in swimming pools and at Veterans Stadium.
NEWS
February 11, 2000 | By Kelly Wolfe, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Sometimes you just have to lock the door, regroup and retrain. That is the attitude at the Coatesville District Court, 256 E. Lincoln Highway, one of the five busiest district courts in Chester County. Although the court closed Feb. 1, staff members said they were as busy as ever, working to whittle away a decade's worth of backlog and brush up on people skills. "We're really making progress," said Anita E. McDevitt, minor judiciary administrator for Chester County. The court is expected to reopen March 1, just in time for an annual Chester County audit.
NEWS
May 6, 2000 | By Rita Giordano, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The ashes of 43 of the 62 people believed to be veterans that have languished on shelves in the Philadelphia morgue appear to be on their way soon to a proper burial. Staff at the Indiantown Gap National Cemetery outside Harrisburg have verified all but 19 of the remains as honorably discharged servicemen, entitling them to veterans' burials, Judy Stickler, the cemetery's management analyst, said yesterday. Among the verified remains are those of Paul Meinzer, a Philadelphia World War II veteran whose ashes have been at the morgue since he died in 1996.
BUSINESS
December 21, 1994 | By Andrew Maykuth, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
E. Talbot Briddell was practically panting yesterday in his first full day at the helm of Philadelphia Gas Works. He blamed a cold for his audible respiration. But the whirlwind of activity would leave anyone breathless. "In the first 24 hours we've been here, we've reduced the backlog of customer complaints by a thousand," said Briddell, a corporate-turnaround specialist whose firm was named Monday by Mayor Rendell to restructure the city-owned PGW. Briddell said the utility would reduce the backlog of 4,000 to 5,000 service orders to near zero by Christmas Eve by reinstituting suspended overtime and by temporarily hiring crews from Peco Energy Co. "We have pulled out all stops to get that done," he said.
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