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NEWS
December 19, 1994 | by Joanne Sills, Daily News Staff Writer
The Dawson family has been living with a broken heater for more than a week, and it looks as if they're in for a frigid Christmas, too. It seems that in their desperation to quit sleeping in coats and moving electric heaters from room to room - and waiting for all day for gas repair workers to show up - last Wednesday they called in a false gas-leak report. They hoped that whoever answered the call would take pity on them and send someone to fix their heater. After all, said Leisa Dawson, they had a service contract with Philadelphia Gas Works.
NEWS
May 18, 1994 | By Martha Woodall, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
With every day that passed, the Port Richmond woman grew more worried that a 3-month-old boy in her neighborhood was being starved. The baby's parents already had sold nearly everything in their apartment - including the refrigerator - to buy crack. Now they were selling their food stamps and even the government coupons they were supposed to use to buy milk or formula for their child. The woman reported her suspicions to the state child-abuse hotline, which forwarded the complaint to the city Department of Human Services.
NEWS
July 31, 1998 | By Natalie Kostelni, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Montgomery County domestic-relations officials yesterday promised an end to the glitches in a new computer system that held up some payments from deadbeat parents to their former partners. The new Pennsylvania Automated Child Support Enforcement System, or PACSES, began July 6. It is geared to track down parents who are not supporting their children and disburse payments on the children's behalf. But since the county connected to the system, several parents have not received checks.
NEWS
May 1, 1995 | By Tom Avril, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Hill v. Gist, Docket No. L-1953-89; Allen v. Roberts, Docket No. L-1543-91; Mendez v. Jones, Docket No. L-1585-89: Each is at least an inch thick, crammed with briefs, Post-it notes, and memos scrawled in pencil by a judge. One deals with a car accident that took place when Ronald Reagan was President. Another has been scheduled for trial 12 times, only to be postponed again and again. They are part of a steadily growing backlog of Superior Court civil cases in Burlington County, the second worst such backlog in New Jersey's 21 counties.
NEWS
February 15, 2012 | BY STEPHANIE FARR, farrs@phillynews.com 215-854-4225
IN THE EIGHT months since armed robbers first burst into the TriStar Market, in Yeadon, store owner Patel Bharat has turned his counter and sandwich station into a $15,000 bulletproof glass cage. Yet the State Police's Bureau of Forensic Services still hasn't processed three pieces of evidence - a gun, clothing and gloves - that were left behind at the scene and may hold the DNA clues to solving the case. In the meantime, Bharat's store has been robbed twice more at gunpoint, including less than a month after the first robbery - and by the same two men, he believes.
BUSINESS
August 27, 2003 | By Bob Fernandez INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Toll Bros. Inc., which sells homes in 185 subdivisions throughout the United States, said yesterday that the market for expensive new homes was strong in the third quarter as profit, sales and backlog surged to record levels. Toll Bros., based in Huntingdon Valley, also said that over the last 16 weeks, potential buyers had placed an unusually high number of deposits on homes to be built in its subdivisions. This "should yield record results in 2004," Toll Bros. said. The home builder's earnings for the quarter ended July 31 rose 27.5 percent to $68.2 million from $53.5 million in the same quarter a year ago. On a per-share basis, the company earned 90 cents for the quarter, compared with 70 cents a year ago. Revenue rose to $693 million from $580.
NEWS
August 27, 1994 | By Robert Moran, INQUIRER HARRISBURG BUREAU
Despite cries of foul from State Auditor General Barbara Hafer, Gov. Casey's budget office yesterday released the final report of a critical performance audit of Hafer's department. Earlier this month, Hafer fired a round of complaint letters to state and national accountancy boards, alleging misconduct by Coopers & Lybrand, the firm commissioned by the governor's budget office to conduct the audit. Although the budget office highlighted the critical audit findings, Hafer was generally cautious in her reaction.
NEWS
September 15, 2000 | By Eugene Kiely, INQUIRER TRENTON BUREAU
As part of an agency-wide review, the New Jersey Parole Board has demoted a top official and will overhaul a two-year-old investigation unit that critics say contributed to the board's huge backlog of parole cases. Meanwhile, negotiations to settle a class-action suit brought by inmates over the backlog have hit a snag, the lawyer for the inmates said yesterday. Jule Dolci, the agency's director of operations for the past two years, was assigned to Northern State Prison in Newark last week, acting executive director Ken Connolly confirmed yesterday.
NEWS
March 7, 1994 | By Jeff Gelles and Richard Jones, INQUIRER STAFF WRITERS
Trash will be collected on a normal schedule throughout Philadelphia this week, city officials said yesterday. At the same time, sanitation crews will continue to work overtime to try to clean up the backlog left over on many neighborhood streets. "We're generally behind across the city," said Clarena I.W. Tolson, deputy streets commissioner. Tolson was acknowledging a fact that city residents have been living with through this winter's succession of storms and thaws: Trash collection has been erratic.
NEWS
June 8, 1993 | By Vanessa Williams, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Rickety bridges, broken signs and leaking roofs have cost Philadelphia millions in extra rehabilitation costs and lawsuits because the city has no regular maintenance program for its structures and facilities, according to a study released yesterday by the city controller. Jonathan A. Saidel, the city controller, estimated that the backlog of needed maintenance would equal $24 million, or 1.1 million hours of work. During the last two years, he noted, the Recreation Department has paid about $2.5 million to settle lawsuits brought by people injured at playgrounds, in swimming pools and at Veterans Stadium.
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