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Backlog

NEWS
March 26, 2013 | By Kevin Freking, Associated Press
WASHINGTON - Although the number of pending veterans' disability claims keep soaring, Veterans Affairs Secretary Eric Shinseki on Sunday said he's committed to ending the backlog in 2015 by replacing paper with electronic records. Veterans receive disability compensation for injuries or illness incurred during their active military service. About 600,000 claims, or 70 percent, are considered backlogged. The number of claims pending for more than 125 days has nearly quadrupled under Shinseki's watch.
NEWS
October 14, 2012 | BY JAN RANSOM, Daily News Staff Writer
GOOD-GOVERNMENT group the Committee of Seventy is concerned about a backlog of voter-registration applications in the City Commission's Office ahead of the Nov. 6 presidential election. Seventy's president, Zack Stalberg, wrote to city officials that it appears that the number of unprocessed registrations may exceed 20,000, "raising the possibility that potential voters will not be registered - or know whether they are registered - in time to vote on Election Day. " "We got calls from a number of voters who were concerned they didn't get their voter registration yet," said Ellen Kaplan, policy director for the Committee of Seventy, adding that it would like to help by either recruiting volunteers to assist commission staff or urging the Commissioners to hire temporary workers that can help tackle the backlog.
NEWS
October 3, 2012 | By Geoff Mulvihill, Associated Press
TRENTON - New Jersey would have to start paying unemployment to people who appeal denials but cannot get answers to them within eight weeks under a bill advanced Monday by a state Senate committee. The bill, which advanced on a 3-0 vote with two abstentions by the Labor Committee, is intended to push the Department of Labor to deal with appeals that have been piling up as the number of unemployed remains high and the state denies a larger portion of claims. On Monday, state Department of Labor Department and Workforce Development officials told the committee that it has structural changes to deal with reducing the backlog.
NEWS
March 28, 2012
FROM THOSE wonderful workers at the state Department of Public Welfare - the ones who will soon have to start verifying the assets of up to 1.8 million recipients of food stamps in the state - comes a massive backlog of applications for heating assistance that could lead to utility shut-offs for tens of thousands of Pennsylvanians as soon as next week. Lawyers from Community Legal Services sent a letter Tuesday to the Public Utility Commission asking that utility customers who filed for help from the Low Income Home Energy Assistance Program (LIHEAP)
NEWS
March 12, 2012 | BY JAN RANSOM & PHILLIP LUCAS, Daily News Staff Writers
THE POLICE Advisory Commission is often described as a toothless, civilian-run police oversight board without the authority to do anything. The PAC is only able to make recommendations to the Police Department in response to citizen complaints - something it's done just 21 times since 1994. In January, Police Commissioner Charles Ramsey accepted a recommendation that officers brush up on guidelines about obtaining search warrants after two cops illegally entered a Frankford house in 2010.
NEWS
March 9, 2012 | By Chris Mondics, Inquirer Staff Writer
Amid complaints from corporate defense lawyers about the fairness of Philadelphia's civil justice system, judicial leaders have begun to make changes they say will reduce a backlog of cases and improve the overall functioning of the courts. The changes, put forth quietly in an order from Common Pleas Court Judge John Herron, focus in large measure on what he said was an overflow of asbestos lawsuits by out-of-state lawyers. But they also go well beyond asbestos litigation and address many of the concerns defense lawyers have raised.
NEWS
February 16, 2012 | BY STEPHANIE FARR, farrs@phillynews.com 215-854-4225
HIGHLIGHTING the importance of processing DNA evidence, Chester County prosecutors said yesterday that they had solved a three-year-old rape case thanks to DNA taken from a man after he was convicted of an unrelated crime. Maynard Church, 38, was walking with his German shepherd on Sept. 27, 2009, in East Nottingham Township when he came upon a 14-year-old girl who was walking alone on Little Elk Creek Road, police said. Church forced the victim to her hands and knees, had her take off her shoes, and smelled her feet and rubbed them on his face, according to court documents.
NEWS
February 15, 2012 | BY STEPHANIE FARR, farrs@phillynews.com 215-854-4225
IN THE EIGHT months since armed robbers first burst into the TriStar Market, in Yeadon, store owner Patel Bharat has turned his counter and sandwich station into a $15,000 bulletproof glass cage. Yet the State Police's Bureau of Forensic Services still hasn't processed three pieces of evidence - a gun, clothing and gloves - that were left behind at the scene and may hold the DNA clues to solving the case. In the meantime, Bharat's store has been robbed twice more at gunpoint, including less than a month after the first robbery - and by the same two men, he believes.
NEWS
February 15, 2012 | BY STEPHANIE FARR, farrs@phillynews.com 215-854-4225
THE PHILADELPHIA Police Department's Forensic Sciences Bureau has grappled with its own backlog for years, but with renewed efforts and a new leader, the bureau was able to reduce it by a third within the past year. Michael Garvey Jr., who has worked for the FBI and CIA, is the first civilian head of the bureau and the only one to also be given the title of deputy managing director. Before him, high-level police officials were in charge. "It's a trend throughout forensic science to bring in folks that not only deal with running the administration portion of a forensic science entity, but can also understand and deal with all of the technical issues," he said.
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