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Bacon

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FOOD
December 10, 1986 | By MERLE ELLIS, Special to the Daily News
If our pioneering forefathers had had to rely on the supermarket bacon of today as the staple of the long trek "westward-ho-the wagons," they wouldn't have made it much past Pittsburgh. No meat in America has suffered more from modern technology than bacon. The insipid watered-down stuff that is labeled "bacon" today is as far removed from real bacon as a horsefly is from the horse it rode in on. Most of the bacon that you find in today's meatcases is "pumped" bacon. What that means is that the curing solution made up of water, salt, sugar, sodium phosphate (to hold the water in)
FOOD
June 16, 2016
Makes 4 servings 12 slices bacon 24 large sea scallops, tendons removed 3 tablespoons unsalted butter, melted 1/2 teaspoon salt 1/8 teaspoon pepper 2 lemons, halved 1/4 cup chopped fresh chives 1. Place 4 layers of paper towels on large plate, and arrange 6 slices of bacon over towels in single layer. Top with 4 more paper towels and remaining 6 slices bacon. Cover with 2 layers of paper towels; place second large plate on top and press gently to flatten.
NEWS
April 15, 2015 | By Dan Meyers, For The Inquirer
ALLENTOWN - Matt Caton maneuvered around the wood skewer impaling a thick slice of maple-coated bacon. He took a bite. "Awesome," he said, chewing happily Sunday on the newest offering at the Lehigh Valley IronPigs' stadium. Caton knows that a health-focused organization tried to get the team, the Phillies' triple-A affiliate, to ban bacon last year. He didn't know that the Physicians Committee for Responsible Medicine (PCRM) is back again this season. "Stop complaining and enjoy it with a baseball game," Caton said as the IronPigs battled the Pawtucket Red Sox. That's easy to do in a bacon-infused ballpark that features a mascot named Chris P. Bacon, and sells chocolate-covered bacon and bacon-scented T-shirts.
FOOD
November 30, 1986 | The Inquirer staff
Consumers soon may be able to bring home the bacon without worrying about the extra baggage of a potential cancer-causing compound often found in the cooked meat. The encouraging news on the breakfast front comes as a result of recent action by the U.S. Agriculture Department. Earlier this month, the agency approved the use of a Vitamin E derivative that prevents the formation of nitrosamines, carcinogens that occur in bacon during cooking. Whether food manufacturers will apply the vitamin-based substance, alpha tocopherol, to the popular breakfast food is unknown right now, but its very availability is a breakthrough that caps a decade of research into combating the cancer-causing agents.
FOOD
April 12, 2013 | By Maureen Fitzgerald, Inquirer Food Editor
Maliyah Gregg's eyes lit up when she spied a package of bacon on the counter for cooking class in the convent kitchen at St. Martin De Porres in North Philadelphia. And then she saw the spinach. "Can I eat just the bacon? Please? Just the bacon and a boiled egg. It will be like breakfast. Please?" After four weeks of cooking lessons, I had gotten the message loud and clear from Maliyah and the other 5th and 6th grade girls: We want meat! While many people are eating less meat and trying to center meals around other proteins for health and environmental reasons, these girls are not quite buying in. I heard the same chorus from my own two boys when I tried meatless family dinners when they were growing up. For them, it just didn't feel like dinner without meat.
FOOD
July 22, 1992 | by Polly Fisher, Special to the Daily News
Dear Polly: I have several recipes calling for salt pork (stews, chowders, etc.), which I cannot find in my local supermarkets. Is there a substitute? - Mrs. D.G. Salt pork comes from the fatty belly of the pig. It is heavily salted (hence its name) and can be kept in the refrigerator for four to six weeks. I usually substitute bacon for salt pork. The bacon contributes a different flavor, since it is smoked and salt pork is not. Personally, I prefer using the bacon to the salt pork since I find the smoky flavor of bacon more attractive and interesting in these dishes, though purists may object.
NEWS
February 21, 2014 | By Molly Eichel
TELFORD-BASED Godshall's Quality Meats made headlines when it created a bacon medal for Sage Kotsenburg , the first-ever gold medalist in the men's snowboard slopestyle. Kotsenburg, a prolific social-media user, tweeted that he wished his medal was made from bacon: "Ahh I wish the Sochi medals were made out of bacon thoooo..!!" Godshall's obliged. But with turkey bacon because Kotsenburg has to watch that athletic figure. Yesterday, Kotsenburg received the medal on "Conan.
FOOD
October 18, 1989 | By Jean Anderson and Elaine Hanna, Special to The Inquirer
The microwave makes breakfast a breeze. Lunch and brunch, too. Eggs microwave to perfection, but even better, bacon browns and crisps with no messy spattering. Microwaving times for bacon will vary because of differences in thickness and fattiness, plus the amount of salt and sugar used in curing. It also takes longer to microwave large amounts of bacon (more than eight slices) than to fry them in a skillet, so either use the range or microwave in batches of eight slices. The advantages to microwaving bacon?
FOOD
September 5, 1997 | by Ken Hoffman, For the Daily News
This week, I reached out for a Hickory Smoked Whopper, offered for a limited time only at Burger King. Here's the blueprint: Start with a regular, fully loaded Whopper off the assembly line, then crown it with a slice of hickory-smoked Cheddar cheese and four half-slices of hickory-smoked bacon. Voila! A Hickory Smoked Whopper. And the sweet hickory really does kick the burger up a notch. In a related development, the seventh president of the United States was Andrew "Old Hickory" Jackson.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 26, 2010 | By Rick Nichols, Inquirer Columnist
Matt Ridgway calls the slabs that come out of his curing room at PorcSalt, simply, bacon. Which doesn't quite tell the whole story. That the pork bellies come from flavorful, old breeds - Berkshire and Berkshire-Duroc crosses, that last one from Breakway Farms in Mount Joy. That it is cured in the Bucks County honey his father, Josef, collects. Or alternatively - for 10 days - with red Burgundy wine. Or that it is, by design, hot-smoked for 10 hours over fruitwood at temperatures 10 degrees higher than name brands, which renders it (unlike commercial bacons)
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
August 28, 2016 | By Jacqueline L. Urgo, Staff Writer
WHAT IT IS - Move over apple: Scrapple is now the best-selling pie flavor at Wards Pastry Shop in Ocean City. While your dream of a perfect pie flavor may not be that whitish congealed block of something-or-other made famous by the Pennsylvania Dutch, apparently this bakery - around for 88 years and considered a Jersey Shore staple - knows a thing or two about taking such an oddity and making it, well, palatable. "I think some people hear about scrapple pie and come in and buy it for the goof . . . but they come back because they try it and it's really good," said Wards' owner and chief baker Walter Hohman, 51, who started working in the bakery when he was 12. Scrapple is traditionally a combination of pork offal - scraps and trimmings like the heart, head, liver, and bones that wouldn't be used for anything else - that is boiled down into a broth and then combined with cornmeal, flour, and spices to form a mush.
BUSINESS
July 18, 2016 | By Diane Mastrull, Staff Writer
As an owner of The Bacon Jams, Michael Oraschewsky insisted there was nothing significant about his decision to order a vegetarian entree during our recent lunch interview. Yet on that late June afternoon in Philadelphia's Point Breeze neighborhood, Oraschewsky revealed that his spreadable-bacon company plans to drop the word bacon from its product name. Also vanishing from the label is the sunglasses-wearin', guitar-strummin', electric-pink pig. A new subdued look is on the menu for a fourth- quarter debut: TBJ Gourmet , thick black letters say. Discreetly tucked in the white space between the "T" and "B" are the tiny face, front legs, and curly tail of a pig, its snout a soft pink.
FOOD
June 16, 2016
Makes 4 servings 12 slices bacon 24 large sea scallops, tendons removed 3 tablespoons unsalted butter, melted 1/2 teaspoon salt 1/8 teaspoon pepper 2 lemons, halved 1/4 cup chopped fresh chives 1. Place 4 layers of paper towels on large plate, and arrange 6 slices of bacon over towels in single layer. Top with 4 more paper towels and remaining 6 slices bacon. Cover with 2 layers of paper towels; place second large plate on top and press gently to flatten.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 5, 2016 | By Vance Lehmkuhl, Staff Writer
IF BACON is the answer, what's the question? I don't mean a comment-thread question like, "How could anyone want to harm these adorable scampering piglets?" I mean in brick-and-mortar kitchens where the question seems to be, "What food goes with everything?" "Dude, just put bacon on it, bacon makes it better," Memphis Taproom owner Brendan Hartranft said, imitating a surfer voice. But with tasty, innovative offerings, the Kensington bar is among those showing that bacon also goes well with compassion.
FOOD
February 26, 2016
Makes 2-4 servings 1/2 pound sunchokes 1/2 teaspoon freshly squeezed lemon juice Kosher salt 1 large leek 1 tablespoon unsalted butter 2 ounces bacon, finely diced 1 tablespoon chopped fresh flat-leaf parsley leaves 1/2 teaspoon chopped fresh thyme leaves 1 teaspoon Dijon mustard 1 large egg, beaten 1 tablespoon extra-virgin olive oil 4 poached eggs 1. Peel the sunchokes and cut them into...
FOOD
January 15, 2016
Here's a paleo variation on a longtime favorite: New England fish chowder. The folks at America's Test Kitchen pureed cooked cauliflower to stand in for the heavy cream to maintain the richness without the dairy. Bacon adds flavor as well as texture - added as a crispy garnish on top. New England Fish Chowder 4 slices bacon 1 large onion, chopped 1 teaspoon minced fresh thyme or 1/4 teaspoon dried 2 8-ounce bottles clam juice 2 cups water 8 ounces cauliflower florets, cut into 1/2-inch pieces 1 celery root (14 ounces)
FOOD
December 4, 2015
At what point does a dish with carbonara in its name and some carbonara components become something else entirely? British food giant Jamie Oliver's healthful version inspires the question. Skinny Carbonara With Peas, Almonds, and Basil Makes 2 servings   Kosher salt 7 ounces (13/4 cups) frozen green peas 5 ounces whole-wheat pasta, preferably linguine 1 tablespoon sliced, skin-on almonds 1 teaspoon olive oil 1 slice smoky bacon, preferably thick-cut 1 small clove garlic Leaves from 4 stems fresh basil 21/2 tablespoons grated Parmigiano-Reggiano cheese 1 lemon 1 large egg 1/2 cup plain low-fat or nonfat yogurt   1. Bring a pot of water to a boil.
NEWS
November 8, 2015 | By Sandy Bauers, For The Inquirer
The news left vegetarians feeling vindicated. It sent meat producers into a tizzy. And it left many others wondering: Do bacon and bologna really cause cancer? Two weeks ago, after a group of 22 scientists reviewed numerous studies, World Health Organization officials concluded that processed meat is carcinogenic, and that eating a couple of slices a day increases a person's risk of colorectal cancer by about 18 percent. But like so many cancer risks, teasing out the details and maintaining perspective is crucial.
NEWS
September 12, 2015 | By Jack Tomczuk, Inquirer Staff Writer
Rachel Bacon Bull, 72, of Garnet Valley, who taught for West Chester Friends School for 25 years, died Aug. 13 at the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania of a stroke. The daughter of Francis Farquhar Bacon and Julia Armour, she was born in Detroit to a Quaker family that moved around the country before settling in Bucks County. She met her husband when she went off to Goddard College, a small liberal-arts school in Plainfield, Vt., in the early '60s. Back then, all new students had to go through orientation, and Richard Alden Bull was her orientation leader.
NEWS
September 6, 2015 | By Amy S. Rosenberg, Inquirer Staff Writer
BRIGANTINE, N.J. - It can be hard out there for a lifeguard. So when someone like Rich "Rich the Butcher" Hill shows up at the Jetty, fires up the Weber, and starts passing up bacon burgers to the Beach Patrol members on the lifeguard stand - and we're talking custom burgers where the bacon is blended into the mix - legendary status is immediately bestowed. Rich the Butcher, 56-year-old owner of the Colonial Village Meat Market in West Chester, has very much earned most-honored-shoobie status at the Jetty, a drive-on south-end beach in Brigantine.
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