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NEWS
December 11, 2002
What is it about the holidays that makes us long for the past? For the times when cards came through traditional mail. Presents were bought at a store. Turkey was never tofu. And spam . . . well, it was just a Monty Python routine: Man in cafe: "Well, what've you got?" Waitress: "Well, there's egg and bacon; egg, sausage and bacon; egg and spam; egg, bacon and spam; egg, bacon, sausage and spam; spam, bacon, sausage and spam. . . . " Back then the joke was on a canned meat product.
FOOD
November 21, 2007
Chad Beene likes peanut butter on everything, says his wife, Kellyann. When the couple opened the Urban Saloon in Fairmount recently, there was no question they'd serve a burger topped with peanut butter and bacon. Stop making that face! People put mayo on their burgers, right? Peanut butter-and-bacon has that fat-fat, salt-salt thing, with the added smokiness of the bacon and earthy nuttiness of the peanut butter. It's served on Texas toast, with a lettuce leaf. (Given the fat content, it should come with a nitro tab.)
NEWS
April 26, 2012 | By Maureen Fitzgerald, INQUIRER FOOD EDITOR
Here is an excerpt from the blog "My Daughter's Kitchen. " A few years working in New England gave me a taste of some of the best "chowda" I had ever eaten, both at little corner restaurants, seafood shacks on the Cape, and of course, at the famed Legal Sea Foods in Boston. Everyone had their own version, but the best were smooth and rich soups, stocked with clams, potatoes, a little onion, and a healthy splash of cream. Back in the Philadelphia area, I found it hard to find the same soup, as most restaurant renditions were dense and gloppy, thickened with flour and resonating with a strong flavor of bacon.
NEWS
March 11, 2013
BEN STANGO's mom made the right call when he was in middle school. He'd gotten hooked on the Food Network. She let the boy cook. "I went big with my first meal," Stango says in his Center City kitchen. "A whole salmon. " It was tasty. Subsequent meals, less so. Regardless, now Stango's mother, Deb Weinstein, gets to cash in. He's cooking her a birthday dinner that he'll take to her home in Merion Station: Homemade beet tagliatelle with pine nuts and arugula, and pan-seared scallops with lemon and garlic.
NEWS
February 10, 2013
Year's first war casualty buried WASHINGTON - More than 100 family members, friends, and uniformed service members marched slowly and quietly down a hill at Arlington National Cemetery on Friday, following Army Sgt. Aaron X. Wittman's coffin, draped with an American flag and carried on a horse-drawn caisson. Wittman, 28, of Chester, Va., was buried with full military honors in Section 60, where those killed in Iraq and Afghanistan lie. He was killed Jan. 10 in Nangahar province in Afghanistan, becoming the first U.S. casualty of this year.
FOOD
May 8, 1991 | by Polly Fisher, Special to the Daily News
Dear Polly: Please let me know what the ingredient is that's added to sugar to make powdered sugar? - Alice You can easily make your own powdered sugar at home by whirling regular white sugar in a blender or food processor (the food processor works best) until it is fine and powdery. It becomes even more like the commercial powdered sugar when you add 1 1/2 teaspoons cornstarch to each cup of granulated sugar before processing it. Store the homemade powdered sugar in an airtight covered container.
FOOD
September 13, 1987 | By Elaine Tait, Inquirer Food Writer
For a brief time, when they're locally abundant, you can buy bright yellow, red and occasionally even rare black-skinned peppers for a fraction of their midwinter prices. 'Tis the time, then, to revel in their beauty and flavor. Pepper Potpourri Pasta lets you mix and match pepper colors and heats to suit yourself. The dish, designed for cooks in a hurry, is almost a meal in itself, with bacon and grated cheese adding to the hefty combination of green fettuccine and sauteed slices of pepper.
FOOD
December 6, 1987 | By Elaine Tait, Inquirer Food Writer
The friend who offered oyster gravy with his Thanksgiving cornbread stuffing could not have imagined where that intriguing flavor combination would lead. The gravy, made with browned bits from the turkey-roasting pan, turkey stock and heavy cream, and poured over the slightly sweet golden stuffing, seemed too delicious a treat to save for a single fall holiday. So tasters began saying, "What if?," to create variations for other occasions. What if you didn't have turkey-roast drippings to make the gravy?
FOOD
July 5, 1989 | By Elaine Tait, Inquirer Food Writer
One of the drawbacks of cooking with the early microwave ovens was that foods were not attractively browned in the process. Today's cook has a battery of specially designed utensils to help with that step, but such devices tend to be relatively expensive. An alternative is to brown the foods in the conventional way, using a stovetop burner. The browned foods can then be finished with microwave speed. To illustrate, consider the following menu designed for cooks In a Hurry.
FOOD
September 13, 1989 | By Jean Anderson and Elaine Hanna, Special to The Inquirer
If you've never tried microwaving artichokes, you're in for a treat. Not only do they cook faster than you would have dreamed possible, they taste terrific. That's because they steam in their own fragrant vapor and don't get waterlogged in a kettle of boiling water. Here's the basic method plus an elegant stuffed artichoke recipe that's perfect for a first course. Choose 6- to 8-ounce globe artichokes, cut stems flush with bottoms, snip off prickly petal tips and rub cut edges with lemon.
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