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ENTERTAINMENT
January 8, 2003 | By LAUREN MCCUTCHEON For the Daily News
What happens when three Irish-American pals from Mayfair - including chef Kevin O'Kane, who did time at the swanky Happy Rooster and the posh Fountain - open up a sandwich shop on Main Street in Manayunk called Mixx on Main (4307 Main St.)? Some serious sandwiches, that's what. One of the most seriously flavorful is the Ham Bone, a hot club named after O'Kane's old boss, chef Martin Hamman of the Four Seasons. THE HAM BONE 2 tablespoons butter 3 slices white bread 5 slices American cheese 3 ounces thinly sliced turkey 3 ounces thinly sliced ham Black pepper Kosher salt 6 strips crispy bacon 1/2 avocado, deseeded and julienned In large saute pan, melt one tablespoon butter, add white bread, and top with cheese.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 4, 2011
Menu: Burgers, fries, veggie burgers, sodas and milkshakes, all made with local ingredients and served from a jazz-blasting former sausage truck. Find it: LOVE Park, 11 a.m.-3 p.m. Tuesdays and Thursdays; two changing stops on weekends. Where else: Wherever they tweet they'll be @LOSBurgerTruck. How new: Less than 3 weeks. Web : www.luckyoldsouls.com . Signature item: "LOS" Burger, 4.5 ounces of pink-in-the-middle Lancaster grass-fed beef layered with house-cured bacon, smoked cheddar, sautéed onions, pickled tomatoes and special barbecue-y mayo on a brioche-style roll, $9. What you'll spend: Burgers start at $5.50.
FOOD
January 4, 1989 | By Gerald Etter, Inquirer Food Writer
A classic sauce isn't a necessity for every kitchen all the time. A nice simple sauce, made from the juices of freshly cooked meat and coupled with pan drippings deglazed with a bit of wine, is a wonderful accompaniment. But a classic, sophisticated sauce, such as an espagnole sauce, can open new horizons for the cook. Some chefs view an espagnole sauce as nothing more than a glorified basic brown sauce. More accurately, however, it is a brown sauce that has reached the halfway point of preparation, before the demiglace stage.
FOOD
February 20, 1991 | By Bonnie Tandy Leblang and Carolyn Wyman, Special to the Daily News
STOUFFER'S RIGHT COURSE. Lasagna with meat sauce, spaghetti with meatballs, broiled chicken tenderloins and beef cacciatore. $2.69 per 9 1/4- to 10 1/2- ounce frozen entree. BONNIE: These four new entrees are similar to the rest of the Right Course line in being low in calories, fat, sodium and cholesterol. Each contains about 300 calories, with less than 30 percent of the calories from fat, and about 550 milligrams of sodium. Unlike others in the line, the lasagna and the spaghetti and meatballs are not new, healthy creations but traditionally high-fat foods that Stouffer's made low in fat, low in sodium and unfortunately low in taste.
FOOD
October 23, 2002 | By Betty Rosbottom FOR THE INQUIRER
Though breakfast generally takes a backseat to other meals, that changes when I entertain. When family or friends stay with us, coffee, toast, and a bowl of cereal seems too mundane. I've prepared potato omelettes or scrambled eggs with herbs and smoked salmon for company, or mounds of pancakes or stacks of waffles, garnished with smoked sausages or ham. Recently I served a gratin of eggs baked with leeks, bacon and St. Andre cheese, which can be assembled the night before.
FOOD
March 8, 1995 | By Bev Bennett, FOR THE INQUIRER
Turkey reminds me of the television commercial in which people complain to the store manager that the frozen dinner he stocks provides too much food for one person. Just as this particular brand of frozen dinner isn't designed to be skimpy, neither is a turkey. Anything short of eight guests guarantees leftovers. But you do have an alternative to setting more plates at the dinner table. Use turkey parts, buying only as much as you'll need. Instead of bringing a whole bird to the table, present a delicious Turkey Gumbo.
FOOD
July 2, 1986 | By BARBARA GIBBONS, Special to the Daily News
Just when you think you've run out of ways to cook chicken, the seasons change. With each turn of the page on your calendar comes a new opportunity to use this favorite of calorie-watchers. The fresh approach for midsummer is cook out or take out: chicken cooked over the coals or picnic chicken served chilled. The latter can be purchased ready-to-serve in the supermarket and made into meal-size salads or sandwiches. Here are some outdoor ideas that are perfect for bare-midriff weather.
FOOD
January 26, 1997 | By Bev Bennett, FOR THE INQUIRER
The image of Southern cooking is that it's a process of chopping, simmering and stirring that doesn't end until the last vegetable is boiled into submission. Not true. Southern cooking has evolved into a style as light, fresh and fast as any in the country. But it is still tasty. One difference is that Southern cooks use fat as a flavoring, not just a browning agent, so their dishes have a deep, developed taste. For example, a little bacon fat gives vegetables a smoky, rich accent.
FOOD
August 26, 1992 | By Marc Schogol, with reports from Inquirer wire services
FAT'S IN THE FIRE We may be more health-conscious these days, but at the moment we're also eating record amounts of bacon. Bacon consumption has set monthly records since last November as retailers have lowered prices due to large hog production and pork supplies, meat and livestock analysts say. July consumption was 272.3 million pounds, topping the previous July record of 255.1 million pounds set in 1991. And August, normally the highest usage month of the year, set records in its first two weeks, with about nine million pounds of bacon consumed a day. TO MARKET, TO MARKET Lend me your ears: As part of the second annual Fun Food Fest, the Reading Terminal Market is holding Corn Fest from noon to 3 p.m. Friday and Saturday.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 26, 2002 | By LAUREN MCCUTCHEON For the Daily News
What were you doing at 7:30 this morning? If you're a soccer fan, chances are you were watching the last semifinal match of the World Cup. And if you're a soccer diehard, you were probably shouting "Goal!" from a bar stool. The Dark Horse pub (formerly called the Dickens Inn) on Headhouse Square has been opening as early as 2 a.m. for patrons who want to watch games broadcast live from Korea and Japan, sites of the 2002 World Cup. Owner Matt Kennedy says hundreds of fans - mostly European ex-pats - come to his tavern before dawn to watch the games.
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