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FOOD
July 10, 2015 | By Jill P. Capuzzo, For The Inquirer
NEW YORK - If there were a Food Olympics, beets would be overtaking kale in the produce competition. In the flavor event, two unlikely competitors, lavender and sriracha, would be out front, with their counterparts, elderflower and habañero, close behind. Matcha, the trendy powdered green-tea drink, would dominate the beverage field, while waffles would be leaving cupcakes in the dust (or perhaps crumbs). And, in a stunning upset, a Vermont goatherd would take the gold in the confection class, beating out powerhouse European chocolatiers with his goat's-milk caramels.
FOOD
June 26, 2015 | By Danya Henninger, For The Inquirer
Just two years after hawking his first slabs of home-cured bacon at the Lansdowne Farmers Market, Ari Miller is preparing to take his artisanal charcuterie nationwide. 1732 Meats, his new, 4,000- square-foot plant in Yeadon, recently received USDA certification and began production. Miller is hoping for the same reception around the country that he's gotten from local chefs for his high-quality, sustainably raised salumi. "The quality of Ari's product is unmatched as far as domestic salumi is concerned," said Joe Cicala, chef and partner at East Passyunk's Le Virtu and Brigantessa.
NEWS
April 19, 2015 | By Dan Meyers, For The Inquirer
Coming soon to a minor-league ball game near you: Broccoli. Days after a national physicians group renewed its push to get the Phillies' triple-A affiliate, the Lehigh Valley IronPigs, to include vegetables on its pork-laden stadium menu, the team has agreed to add the green stalk. But there's a catch. Bacon is involved, and, it turns out, some national publicity as well for the IronPigs' response. The Physicians Committee for Responsible Medicine (PCRM), a nonprofit based in Washington, asked the team Monday to go easy on the bacon and other processed meat, which the group said is unhealthy, and get some vegetables on fans' plates.
NEWS
April 15, 2015 | By Dan Meyers, For The Inquirer
ALLENTOWN - Matt Caton maneuvered around the wood skewer impaling a thick slice of maple-coated bacon. He took a bite. "Awesome," he said, chewing happily Sunday on the newest offering at the Lehigh Valley IronPigs' stadium. Caton knows that a health-focused organization tried to get the team, the Phillies' triple-A affiliate, to ban bacon last year. He didn't know that the Physicians Committee for Responsible Medicine (PCRM) is back again this season. "Stop complaining and enjoy it with a baseball game," Caton said as the IronPigs battled the Pawtucket Red Sox. That's easy to do in a bacon-infused ballpark that features a mascot named Chris P. Bacon, and sells chocolate-covered bacon and bacon-scented T-shirts.
NEWS
October 28, 2014 | By Jessica Parks, Inquirer Staff Writer
A Doylestown man who was awaiting sentencing for child pornography continued to view and share explicit images online until he was rearrested last week, court documents show. Edward V. Bacon, 21, of Doylestown, was one of eight men charged in a statewide sweep targeting online child predators by the Pennsylvania Attorney General's Office. Two weeks after he pleaded guilty to child pornography charges in Bucks County Court, state prosecutors found videos of children uploaded to an online file-sharing site and tracked them to Bacon's computer, according to the criminal complaint.
NEWS
October 6, 2014 | By Dylan Purcell, Inquirer Staff Writer
Evan Weinstein believes it's bacon's time. "I feel like it's the age of pork," said Weinstein, one of the founders of the inaugural Pennsylvania Bacon Festival, a sold-out event Saturday at Xfinity Live! in South Philadelphia. The "bacon-themed block party," as America Loves Bacon organizers referred to it, was held in a parking lot packed with bands, food trucks, vendors selling bacon themed T-shirts, bacon jams and bacon desserts, and thousands who paid $25 to get in. "I don't even like bacon," Allison Pezzuto, 27, said between bites of a maple-bacon-glazed funnel cake she was supposed to be sharing with friends.
NEWS
September 5, 2014
What to eat: This nondescript food cart, on 15th Street between Vine and Race, is best known for its breakfast sandwiches - cheap protein on a roll, made fast and fresh, to keep Hahnemann University Hospital students and employees going. Nothing fancy, just the classics, with solid execution. Don't miss: Daily News Assistant Managing Editor Gar Joseph insists that Alex and Maria's makes the best scrapple-and-egg sandwich in the city. He offers the following review: "Two well-beaten, fluffy eggs are paired with properly sliced, crispy scrapple on a fresh hoagie or Kaiser roll.
NEWS
July 2, 2014
LOTS OF THE questions I get from readers involve friends, families and finances. Here are some topics that came up during my online chats from folks seeking advice about money situations close to home: Q: My daughter has found herself in a situation where she has to move. Her credit is bad and she is having difficulty getting approved for an apartment. Should I co-sign? Moving back home is not an option. A: Do not co-sign. I know you want to help. However, unless you are truly prepared to make her monthly rent payments, don't do it. If her credit is bad, this is an indication that some financial issues are there already.
NEWS
June 13, 2014
FOOLISH WAFFLES Finally here: We haven't been this excited since the Surf and Turf Truck rolled into LOVE Park and we started running up Filbert Street for steak and lobster bisque. Hey, did you know there are different types of waffles? We didn't. So we tried both that Foolish Waffles co-owners Robin Admana and Florence "Flo" Gardner had to offer. Liege: The sweet, buttery liege waffle ($5) is a darn near perfect dessert, with chunks of pearl sugar that do amazing caramelizing things when baked.
FOOD
March 28, 2014 | By Michael Klein, For The Inquirer
Food lineup at the ballpark   They say 2014 will be a rebuilding year for the Phillies. Same for Aramark, which handles the food at Citizens Bank Park. For its 11th season at the ballpark, Aramark rebuilt many kitchens. The new equipment will allow for new food options and perhaps add speed. At least part of the new lineup will be served Thursday. And it's smokin'. Kevin Tedesco, Aramark's general manager, and Jeremy Campbell, its director of concessions, seem pumped about the pastrami that's brined and smoked in-house, as well as the house-braised and -smoked brisket.
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