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Bacteria

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NEWS
August 7, 2007 | By Tom Avril, Inquirer Staff Writer
Chunks of glacier dug up from Antarctica have revealed a startling cargo, Rutgers University scientists announced yesterday: bacteria that had apparently lain dormant in the ice for up to eight million years. Despite their badly degraded DNA, some of the ancient microbes were able to reproduce after being warmed up in a New Brunswick laboratory, and their genetic code has offered a snapshot of the distant past. The team said its findings, published in the online edition of Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, could help tackle a wide range of scientific questions, from the threat of antibiotic-resistant bacteria to the mysteries of life on Mars.
FOOD
February 16, 1986 | Los Angeles Daily News
There's something new to worry about at the dinner table: food poisoning from "super salmonella" bacteria, which some scientists suspect have developed through the practice of mixing antibiotics with animal feed. Low levels of antibiotics have been used routinely since 1950 to fatten animals quickly and protect them from herd diseases. This helps keep meat prices low in this country, while allowing the grower to make a profit. But there might be a hidden price. Some scientists say the practice is leading to the evolution of bacteria that are resistant or immune to antibiotics.
LIVING
June 10, 1996 | By Marie McCullough, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Few women are aware that bacteria they commonly harbor in their bodies is the chief cause of life-threatening infection and death in newborns. Or that the devastating infections can be avoided. But that's about to change. Federal authorities last week issued guidelines for screening and treating pregnant women for Group B streptococcus to prevent infection of their babies during delivery. "The infections are so tragic because the pregnancy and delivery can go fine and then, a couple hours after delivery, the babies get very sick," said Anne Schuchat, an epidemiologist at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention who helped develop the guidelines.
NEWS
February 13, 1986 | From Inquirer Wire Services
Monterey County supervisors have temporarily banned a historic experiment that would release a genetically altered frost-fighting bacteria onto a strawberry patch. State regulators promptly threatened to sue the county for overstepping its authority. The emergency ordinance, passed unanimously by the Monterey Board of Supervisors on Tuesday, prohibits for 45 days the testing of any genetically engineered organisms in the open environment. By the time that moratorium expires, the supervisors said, they plan to have ready a permanent zoning ordinance to regulate, and possibly ban, such tests.
NEWS
June 25, 1998 | by Mister Mann Frisby, Daily News Staff Writer
Could your child die after taking a dip in a public pool? Chances of it happening are slim, doctors say, but not impossible considering the deadly and quick way in which the E. coli bacteria works. The key to avoiding a catastrophe like the one in Atlanta is to check the water regularly, according to Louis Jordan, manager of the University City Swim Club on Hanson Street near Locust. "As long as you maintain it and do chlorine readings when you're supposed to, there shouldn't be a problem," he said.
NEWS
July 21, 1989 | By Douglas A. Campbell and Mike Schurman, Special to The Inquirer
Ocean City yesterday closed all its beaches after a mile-long garbage slick began washing hypodermic needles, medical debris and other trash ashore. Problems with high levels of bacteria continued to plague beaches in three other Cape May County communities - Wildwood, Wildwood Crest and North Wildwood. In Ocean City, Mayor Roy Gillian ordered the city's seven miles of beaches closed at 4:30 p.m. Because of the needles and the medical waste, Gillian said he closed the sand areas as well as the water to avoid a health hazard.
NEWS
August 26, 2015 | By Justine McDaniel and Michaelle Bond, Inquirer Staff Writers
The bacteria that causes Legionnaires' disease were found in the hot-water systems of buildings at West Chester University last week, causing hot water to be shut off to nine buildings over the weekend until the systems were sanitized. It was the second time this summer that the bacteria have been found on the campus. On Monday - the first day of classes - the remediation company hired to handle the problem reported that the systems had been successfully sanitized, a university spokeswoman said.
NEWS
April 4, 2015 | By Tom Avril, Inquirer Staff Writer
A nasty, antibiotic-resistant bug struck at least 243 people in the United States during the 10-month period ending in February, including six patients in Philadelphia and 12 elsewhere in Pennsylvania, federal and state health officials said Thursday. Though they rarely die, people infected with Shigella bacteria can suffer bloody diarrhea and intense abdominal pain for up to a week. The best defense is hand-washing, as the microbe is commonly spread when an infected person touches other people or prepares food for them, said Bennett Lorber, professor at the Temple University School of Medicine.
NEWS
September 13, 1997 | By David R. Smith
Without quick and decisive action in the battle against emerging infections, diseases we previously thought were on the verge of extinction may rear their ugly heads and provide us a Jurassic Park nightmare. Anyone familiar with the blockbuster movie knows the plot focused on DNA. Much as dinosaurs reemerged in this movie, we have seen new bacteria strains reappear as serious health concerns. Recent media stories have noted the discoveries of new strains of bubonic plague and staphylococcus with limited responsiveness to antibiotics.
NEWS
January 25, 2015 | By John Stern, M.D., For The Inquirer
The patient, a 60-year-old woman, had been battling rheumatoid arthritis for more than a decade. Most of her large joints had been seriously damaged. Both hips, one knee, and a shoulder had been replaced. She took a wide array of medicines, including steroids, but they had failed to stop the illness from progressing. She lacked the strength and dexterity to open a ketchup bottle, and needed family help to complete even small kitchen tasks. Her doctor recommended that she try a new drug known as a "tumor necrosis factor inhibitor," one of the newer "biologics.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
July 21, 2016 | By Sam Wood, Staff Writer
There were few things that Jerome Rodio, a retired Philadelphia police officer, loved more than fishing. On a dock last week on Chesapeake Bay, Rodio watched as an older man worked to bring up several crab traps. Rodio, 75, offered to help. A trap scratched the inside of Rodio's arm as he lifted it out of the shallow water. Three days later, Rodio, of Oxford, Chester County, was dead. "At one point he showed me the scratch and we laughed about it," said son Gene, who accompanied his father on a boat that morning to reel in perch.
NEWS
May 28, 2016 | By Stacey Burling, Staff Writer
A 49-year-old woman who came to a clinic in Pennsylvania with symptoms of a urinary tract infection is the first American found to have new and frightening antibiotic-resistant bacteria, Army researchers reported Thursday. While her particular kind of bacteria, a strain of E. coli, is treatable with some antibiotics, it is resistant to the antibiotic colistin, a drug sometimes used as a last resort for difficult-to-treat infections. What makes the bacteria scarier is their potential to spread colistin resistance to other types of bacteria that are already highly resistant to multiple drugs, infectious-disease experts said.
NEWS
May 22, 2016
*  Monday is World Turtle Day. Started in 2000 by American Tortoise Rescue, its purpose is to promote protection of turtles and tortoises. The hardtop reptiles have a reputation for being low-maintenance, but that is misleading. Red-eared sliders, for instance, are only a few inches long when most people get them, but will eventually require a 75-gallon aquarium. Reptile expert Frank Indiviglio says the best small turtles for people who can't shell out for large turtle or tortoise habitats are common musk turtles, Chinese big headed turtles, mud turtles and North American spotted turtles.
NEWS
April 1, 2016 | By Sam Wood, STAFF WRITER
The Philadelphia Health Department in March asked dozens of restaurants and other eateries to "discontinue food operations" following less than glowing inspections. In previous months, a failing inspection would have earned a sterner-sounding order to cease-and-desist, a toothless demand that the restaurant was free to ignore. But following an agreement with the city's Department of Licenses and Inspections earlier this year, the health department is now reserving "cease-and-desist" for instances when the establishment refuses to close voluntarily.
NEWS
February 28, 2016
'Vaginal seeding" - the practice of swabbing down babies born by Caesarean with vaginal bacteria - sounds good in practice: Studies have shown babies born by surgical methods have different microbiomes, or bacterial colonies living on and in their bodies, than those born "naturally. " And because it seems increasingly clear that certain microbes have a surprising influence on infant health and development, it's no surprise new parents want reassurance their kids haven't gotten the short end of the microbial stick.
NEWS
November 12, 2015 | By Tom Avril, Inquirer Staff Writer
A second Pennsylvania hospital has reported a cluster of unusual infections in patients who underwent open-heart surgery, prompting the state Department of Health to require immediate replacement of "heater-cooler" devices that have been linked to similar illnesses elsewhere. Penn State Hershey Medical Center said Tuesday that in the last four years, three open-heart surgery patients had become infected with nontuberculous mycobacteria - a common bug found in tap water and soil that rarely causes illness.
NEWS
October 25, 2015 | By Sandy Bauers, For The Inquirer
They're everywhere. Too small to be seen by the unaided eye and too numerous to count, they inhabit our insides and outsides, our guts and the surface of our skin. They are the bacteria, viruses, parasites, and other organisms that make up what scientists call our microbiome. It's a complex environment, and scientists are only just beginning to understand and appreciate its vitally important role in keeping us healthy and signaling when we are sick. This week, Penn Vet, Penn Medicine, and the Children's Hospital of Philadelphia will host their second annual microbiome symposium.
NEWS
August 26, 2015 | By Justine McDaniel and Michaelle Bond, Inquirer Staff Writers
The bacteria that causes Legionnaires' disease were found in the hot-water systems of buildings at West Chester University last week, causing hot water to be shut off to nine buildings over the weekend until the systems were sanitized. It was the second time this summer that the bacteria have been found on the campus. On Monday - the first day of classes - the remediation company hired to handle the problem reported that the systems had been successfully sanitized, a university spokeswoman said.
NEWS
May 10, 2015 | By Tom Avril, Inquirer Staff Writer
Growing up in an orphanage in Haiti, Thomy Elusme brushed his teeth regularly and never got a cavity. Yet by his teenage years, a few teeth had started to become loose and one eventually fell out. After coming to New Jersey to live with a host family, the soft-spoken 20-year-old had to have a second one pulled. Elusme suffers from a condition all too familiar to periodontist Daniel H. Fine, who examined the young man last month at the Rutgers University School of Dental Medicine in Newark, N.J. For more than 30 years, Fine has been tackling the mystery of why, through no apparent fault of their own, up to 2 percent of black youths have loose teeth.
NEWS
April 4, 2015 | By Tom Avril, Inquirer Staff Writer
A nasty, antibiotic-resistant bug struck at least 243 people in the United States during the 10-month period ending in February, including six patients in Philadelphia and 12 elsewhere in Pennsylvania, federal and state health officials said Thursday. Though they rarely die, people infected with Shigella bacteria can suffer bloody diarrhea and intense abdominal pain for up to a week. The best defense is hand-washing, as the microbe is commonly spread when an infected person touches other people or prepares food for them, said Bennett Lorber, professor at the Temple University School of Medicine.
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