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Bad Cop

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NEWS
July 15, 1996 | by William Bunch, Daily News Staff Writer
If Richard Wise and Herbert Haak didn't kill Center City jogger Kimberly Ernest, as their attorneys contend, then why did they confess? That's the question that could ultimately decide whether Haak and Wise become free men, or will face possible lethal injection. Richard Ofshe, a sociology professor at the University of Calfornia at Berkeley, the nation's leading authority on coerced confessions, says that suspects do confess to crimes they didn't commit - although no one knows how often it happens.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 6, 1987 | By BEN YAGODA, Daily News Movie Critic
"Lethal Weapon," an action drama starring Mel Gibson, Danny Glover and Gary Busey. Directed by Richard Donner. Screenplay by Shane Black. Running time: 105 minutes. A Warner Brothers release. At area theaters. Last week's movie about a mad-dog white cop and his steady black partner was "Number One with a Bullet. " This week's is "Lethal Weapon. " It's an improvement, but not big enough to make you want the trend to continue. Actually, "Lethal Weapon" proceeds from an intriguing premise: a cop who's literally fearless not because he is courageous but because he is suicidal.
NEWS
October 14, 1995 | by Jim Smith, Daily News Staff Writer
John Baird, the former Philadelphia rogue cop whose admitted wholesale civil-rights abuses and robberies in the 39th District have tarnished the entire Police Department, may be in prison sooner than he expected. Federal prosecutors yesterday moved to revoke Baird's bail after learning that Baird was cited Thursday by Wildwood Crest, N.J., police for drunken driving, refusing to take a Breathalyzer test and reckless driving. Assistant U.S. Attorneys Joel D. Goldstein and William B. Carr Jr. did not oppose Baird's release on bail after he pleaded guilty in March to civil- rights violations, robbery and obstruction of justice, and agreed to tell all he knew about police corruption.
NEWS
April 3, 2001
Capt. James J. Brady was not arrested, he was not given a sobriety test and his crime was covered up by Lt. Joseph (later a captain) DiLacqua. Finnigan's Wake owners were not penalized in any way; the bartenders who served a drunk were not arrested or fired. What would have happened if it was an Italian- or African-American who was driving drunk? JANICE GRANDE Philadelphia Didn't Mayor Street invite a convicted drunk driver to come to Philadelphia and be the star of the July 4th celebration?
ENTERTAINMENT
April 4, 2008 | By Tirdad Derakhshani, Inquirer Staff Writer
Confession of Pain , the latest entry from directors Andrew Lau and Alan Mak, who achieved international acclaim with their epic, three-volume cops'n'-gangster melodrama Infernal Affairs , is a decidedly smaller, more intimate police drama. Set in Hong Kong, Confession revisits the theme of buddy cops who land on opposite sides of the law. This time, it's a look at their personal lives. Detectives Hei (Tony Leung) and Bong (Takeshi Kaneshiro) begin the picture as partners and best friends who work in perfect harmony to bring down a vicious serial rapist.
NEWS
November 6, 2013 | BY MENSAH M. DEAN, Daily News Staff Writer deanm@phillynews.com, 215-568-8278
IN THE ANNALS of Philadelphia crime, the name Nafis Pinkney rings no bells amid the high-profile murderers, mobsters, corrupt cops and politicians. But in 2009, with a high-school diploma, a steady job as a baggage handler at Philadelphia International Airport and no criminal convictions, Pinkney, then 20, found himself beneath the bright light of a criminal interrogation. In a 24-hour span, he went from neighborhood witness to prime suspect, accused of murdering his friend since day-care days, Jonathan Pitts, 21, and Pitts' girlfriend, Nakeisha Finks, 20. Steadfastly maintaining his innocence, Pinkney spent the next four years in city jails awaiting trial, and for 1 1/2 of those years, it was listed as a death-penalty case.
NEWS
March 24, 2011
RE THE LETTER from Officer Giulian: Well said. You couldn't have been more on point. Yes, there are bad cops, bad lawyers, bad professors, bad doctors, but the only front-page news is usually a bad cop or allegedly bad cop who is tried in the newspaper. But this professor gets the front page for his problem with a car stop by an aggressive officer just doing his job. The day the letter was published, I found a small article about a hero detective who without any thought for his own safety jumped into the murky, nasty water of the Delaware on July 7 to save the lives of people who were in trouble.
NEWS
November 5, 2010
ALLEN Iverson playing in Turkey? That's like Robert E. Lee leading the Brooklyn Brigade for the Union Army, the Jonas Brothers at the Apollo, Al Sharpton representing Bala, Gladwyne and Penn Valley. This, sadly, is a vivid picture of a fish out of water. He'll be without a posse in a land where they won't understand not only what he says, but certainly the way this city guy thinks. He could have avoided this by sharpening the skills that aging players need, like outside shooting and leadership.
NEWS
September 8, 2007 | By SOLOMON JONES
"MR. JONES," the detective said pleasantly. "Thanks for coming in voluntarily to tell us what you did. " "Thanks for letting me get it off my chest," I said as his partner stared at me across his battered metal desk. "It's been killing me ever since it happened. " There was an uncomfortable silence. Maybe "killing" wasn't the word I should've used. "So, anyway," the detective said, "I'm going to read you your rights. " "Rights? I thought I was just gonna confess and be on my way. You didn't say anything about reading my rights.
NEWS
August 6, 1996
With the city of Philadelphia backed up two or three steps from the brink of a financial abyss, the Pennsylvania Intergovernmental Cooperation Authority is seeking new heroics: Scrutinizing the city's public schools. Whoa, there. PICA still is operating at a cost of a half-million city dollars a year, the Daily News' Dave Davies reports, even though its current role is much less prominent than it was when created six years ago. But even if the city has to pay it to do nothing, PICA's role as a democratically questionable hybrid of politics and accounting ought to stay small.
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NEWS
November 21, 2014 | By Ronnie Polaneczky, Daily News Columnist
WHO'S SURPRISED that Jeffrey Cujdik got his job back? Not me. Depressed? Totally. Disgusted? God, yes. But surprised? Please - this is Philly, where enough cops who disgrace the Philadelphia Police Department, no matter how badly, somehow manage to successfully appeal their firing before arbitrators unable (or unwilling) to see wrongs that, I swear, would make Stevie Wonder's eyes pop. At least Cujdik, investigated by police Internal Affairs for falsifying search warrants and crossing the line with an informant, won't be getting back pay for the time he has missed since he was canned in May. So the city - already out $1.7 million to settle 33 lawsuits resulting from raids by Cujdik and his rogue narcotics squad - won't be cutting another miserable check.
NEWS
June 11, 2014
PHILADELPHIA'S unemployment rate showed a promising decline recently, and although things could be on an upturn, the long-term health of a big, old city like ours is by no means a sure thing - especially with intractable problems of schools and crime. One worrisome factor behind the city's crime rate is a troubled Police Department. And new evidence of those troubles should raise red flags not just for the city's leadership but for all of us. According to a recent Daily News report, civil-rights lawsuit settlements reached a new high in 2013 of nearly $20 million to settle 207 claims.
NEWS
December 5, 2013 | By Jeremy Roebuck, Inquirer Staff Writer
A former Philadelphia police officer faces up to 20 years in prison after his conviction Monday on charges of obstruction of justice and lying to the FBI. Rafael Cordero, 52, denied accusations that he tipped off his half-brother, a drug dealer and one-time FBI informant, about a heroin trafficking investigation by the FBI and the U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration. But a jury took only hours to find the 23-year veteran of the force guilty of six of the counts against him. The panel acquitted Cordero of one count of obstruction tied to $20,000 in drug money he allegedly hid in his home for his brother.
NEWS
November 6, 2013 | BY MENSAH M. DEAN, Daily News Staff Writer deanm@phillynews.com, 215-568-8278
IN THE ANNALS of Philadelphia crime, the name Nafis Pinkney rings no bells amid the high-profile murderers, mobsters, corrupt cops and politicians. But in 2009, with a high-school diploma, a steady job as a baggage handler at Philadelphia International Airport and no criminal convictions, Pinkney, then 20, found himself beneath the bright light of a criminal interrogation. In a 24-hour span, he went from neighborhood witness to prime suspect, accused of murdering his friend since day-care days, Jonathan Pitts, 21, and Pitts' girlfriend, Nakeisha Finks, 20. Steadfastly maintaining his innocence, Pinkney spent the next four years in city jails awaiting trial, and for 1 1/2 of those years, it was listed as a death-penalty case.
NEWS
October 23, 2013 | Stu Bykofsky, Daily News Columnist
WHEN I SAW Thursday's Page 1 picture showing Philadelphia Police Officer Philip Nace toppling a kids' basketball backboard in North Philadelphia, it reminded me of Sgt. Kovacs in the South Bronx. More than bullies with badges - from what I've read about Nace, and what I know of Kovacs - they are just mean . Kovacs was the terror on wheels of the 41st Precinct - Fort Apache - where I grew up. He'd prowl the streets of the tenement district, a place of close scrapes and fire escapes, in his turtle-shaped squad car looking for imagined trouble.
NEWS
August 17, 2012 | ASSOCIATED PRESS
VAN BUREN TOWNSHIP, MICH. - Officers tasked with the grim job of notifying a woman about the death of her husband stumbled onto a grisly crime scene Thursday when no one responded at the suburban Detroit home, which had been left unlocked. Inside, the woman and the couple's two young children were found dead in separate bedrooms. Investigators were probing whether the man killed his family then committed suicide by driving the wrong way on an interstate highway in neighboring Indiana, instantly killing a stranger, too, as he slammed into the man's car. Police agencies in Michigan and Indiana spent the day trying to connect the dots.
SPORTS
October 27, 2011
BACK WHEN, we used to refer to it as "the first floor/fourth floor thing" because, in the last 2 decades of the Eagles' existence at the Vet, the football people had their offices on the first floor of the decrepit edifice and the front office had its place on the fourth floor. It wasn't always like that - coach Dick Vermeil and owner Leonard Tose were right across the hall from each other during their time together, for instance - but the need for more space and bigger meeting rooms brought about the change in the '80s.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 22, 2011 | By Steven Rea, Inquirer Movie Critic
A version of this review appeared Oct. 22, 2010, when "The Princess of Montpensier" played at the Philadelphia Film Festival. Sixteenth-century France, the slaughter of heretics in Paris, the bloody war between Catholics and Huguenots, and a bunch of guys who can't take their eyes off a girl named Marie. In Bertrand Tavernier's striking wide-screen costume drama, The Princess of Montpensier , Melanie Thierry stars as the beautiful Marie de Mézières, daughter of a sniveling nobleman who forces her into a marriage she does not want.
NEWS
March 24, 2011
RE THE LETTER from Officer Giulian: Well said. You couldn't have been more on point. Yes, there are bad cops, bad lawyers, bad professors, bad doctors, but the only front-page news is usually a bad cop or allegedly bad cop who is tried in the newspaper. But this professor gets the front page for his problem with a car stop by an aggressive officer just doing his job. The day the letter was published, I found a small article about a hero detective who without any thought for his own safety jumped into the murky, nasty water of the Delaware on July 7 to save the lives of people who were in trouble.
NEWS
March 2, 2011 | By BARBARA LAKER & WENDY RUDERMAN, lakerb@phillynews.com 215-854-5933
Police Commissioner Charles Ramsey wanted more than Officer Joseph Sulpizio's badge - he wanted the cop behind bars, locked up like a criminal. But the 42-year-old narcotics cop won't face criminal charges because the Daily News messed up an undercover Internal Affairs investigation when it recently detailed allegations that Sulpizio had repeatedly stolen money from people he stopped, Ramsey said. "He will not be criminally charged because you blew the investigation," a miffed Ramsey said in a telephone interview with the Daily News . "The shame of this is that we weren't able to get him criminally because of the fact that the story ran. " Ramsey yesterday fired Sulpizio for lying to Internal Affairs investigators and for having no regard for his responsibility as a cop. Sulpizio, an 18-year veteran appointed to the Narcotics Strike Force in 1997, hung up on a reporter yesterday when reached on his cell phone.
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