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Bad Faith

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NEWS
August 7, 2001 | By Ovetta Wiggins INQUIRER HARRISBURG BUREAU
A federal judge has found merit to charges that a New Jersey health-management company used the trade secrets of another company to win a nearly $50 million contract to administer Pennsylvania's popular prescription-drug program for the elderly. U.S. District Judge Yvette Kane ruled last month that First Health Group Corp. is likely to succeed in proving that National Prescription Administrators Inc. of Morris County and David Norton, a former First Health executive, operated in "bad faith" during the state bidding process in 1999.
NEWS
December 18, 1996 | By Chris Seper, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Sixteen former clerical and custodial workers have again won back pay, benefits and their jobs after the Commonwealth Court ruled the borough's school district bargained in bad faith in 1993. Three of the court's judges on Monday affirmed previous decisions by the National Labor Relations Board and Bucks County Court, ruling the district must reinstate the members of the Morrisville Educational Support Personnel Association. That decision could cost the district more than $500,000, union members said.
NEWS
March 16, 2015
A Sunday Health section review of Bad Faith: When Religious Belief Undermines Modern Medicine , gave the wrong title of Robert Ross, who was deputy city health commissioner when a measles outbreak swept Philadelphia in January 1991. The erroneous title came from the book. The section was printed in advance. A headline in Sunday's Live Life Love section misspelled the name of the restaurant Juniper Commons. The section was printed in advance.
NEWS
September 24, 1992 | by Jim Smith, Daily News Staff Writer
U.S. District Judge William H. Yohn Jr. yesterday ordered Nationwide Mutual Fire Insurance Co. to pay $90,000 in punitive damages to a 42-year-old disabled supermarket bookkeeper whose home in Aldan, Delaware County, was damaged by fire last year. Yohn said the insurance firm acted in "bad faith" by refusing to pay for the contents of the home and emergency living expenses. That, said the judge, caused "disastrous experiences" for Regina Polcelli, whose only income is $332 every other week in workers' compensation.
NEWS
November 30, 1988 | By Aaron Epstein, Inquirer Washington Bureau
When police officers lose or destroy evidence that could help clear a criminal defendant, they do not violate the defendant's constitutional rights unless they acted in "bad faith," the Supreme Court ruled yesterday. The decision, announced by Chief Justice William H. Rehnquist, was the latest in a recent series of high court rulings providing greater constitutional leeway for the mistakes of law enforcement officers and prosecutors. Three dissenting justices - Harry A. Blackmun, William J. Brennan Jr. and Thurgood Marshall, the court's oldest and most liberal members - attacked yesterday's ruling as a "radical step" that would "provide fewer protections for criminal defendants.
NEWS
February 3, 2000 | By Sudarsan Raghavan, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A federal court appeals panel yesterday overturned the lower-court victory of a woman who had sued her auto-insurance company over payment for injuries suffered in a car accident. Cindy Keefe of Lancaster sustained three injuries in an accident involving an uninsured motorist in August 1995. Two of those injuries, to her knee and shoulder, were clearly caused by the accident, but the third, to her wrist, was in dispute because of a preexisting problem with it. In January 1997, after Keefe's lawyer had requested a partial payment for the knee and shoulder injuries, Prudential Property & Casualty Insurance Co. agreed to pay Keefe $200,000 for a total settlement.
NEWS
December 28, 2007 | By Dan Hardy INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The Pennsylvania Supreme Court has upheld state Education Secretary Gerald Zahorchak's decision to appoint a new governing board in the Chester Upland School District in March, replacing the Republican-dominated board that had run the district since 2003. The unanimous ruling was handed down yesterday; two justices filed a separate, concurring opinion. Zahorchak declared when he appointed the new board that the 4,200-student Chester Upland district had reestablished a sound financial structure.
BUSINESS
March 18, 2013 | By Harold Brubaker, Inquirer Staff Writer
Thousands of U.S. entrepreneurs lost their businesses to the plunging economy and nervous lenders during the madness of the financial crisis. Former Villanova resident Maury Rosenberg was among them, but Rosenberg fought back against U.S. Bank affiliates and won court decisions in Philadelphia and Miami, where he lives in a downtown condo bought for $2.7 million in 2005. A Miami jury found this month in a $6.1 million verdict that U.S. Bank entities acted in bad faith in 2008 when they filed for involuntary bankruptcy against Rosenberg's Philadelphia medical imaging company.
NEWS
August 19, 2008 | By Joseph A. Slobodzian INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A federal judge has dismissed a petition for legal fees by a suburban businessman who was tried - and acquitted - in this year's fraud trial of T. Milton Street Sr. U.S. District Judge Legrome D. Davis ruled that there was no evidence federal prosecutors acted in bad faith when they decided to charge John H. Velardi Sr. with Street for allegedly defrauding a businessman who hoped to land a lucrative subcontract at Philadelphia International Airport....
NEWS
January 15, 2000 | By Candace Heckman, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
A Superior Court judge continued a temporary restraining order yesterday barring Washington Township Mayor Gerald Luongo from demoting the deputy police chief by eliminating the job. Judge Donald A. Smith Jr. said yesterday, however, that he likely would rule in favor of the mayor and suggested that the township file a motion to dismiss the complaint, filed by Deputy Chief James R. Murphy. "From what I can see from the documents, [Luongo] is all-powerful in matters involving the Police Department," Smith told attorneys yesterday, citing the township's strong-mayor form of government.
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SPORTS
April 27, 2016
PRETEND, FOR a moment, that this conversation between Sam Bradford and his agent occurred this offseason. Agent: Let's talk about how we are going to approach free agency. Bradford: I want to stay with the Eagles. Agent: That's definitely an option, but they're hesitant to go beyond two years. Let's talk about what else could be out there. Bradford: I don't really care about what else is out there. I like what I heard from Doug, Howie and Mr. Lurie when we sat down and talked.
NEWS
January 14, 2016 | By Jessica Parks, Staff Writer
A battle over the future of a Montgomery County golf course has escalated from a development spat to a litigious missile crisis, with both sides waiting to see who sues first. West Norriton Township commissioners on Tuesday unanimously, if reluctantly, approved a plan to transform the Westover Country Club into a 103-acre sports complex with two picnic pavilions, a banquet hall, five basketball courts, eight tennis courts, five soccer fields, a football field, two swimming pools, and a skateboard park.
NEWS
March 16, 2015
A Sunday Health section review of Bad Faith: When Religious Belief Undermines Modern Medicine , gave the wrong title of Robert Ross, who was deputy city health commissioner when a measles outbreak swept Philadelphia in January 1991. The erroneous title came from the book. The section was printed in advance. A headline in Sunday's Live Life Love section misspelled the name of the restaurant Juniper Commons. The section was printed in advance.
BUSINESS
October 3, 2014 | By Chris Mondics, Inquirer Staff Writer
On July 26, 2009, Ryan Caruso rear-ended a car in the northbound middle lane of Roosevelt Boulevard about 2 a.m. His car was disabled in the crash, so, as he sat in the driver's seat, his passenger Patrick Hennessy got out and, with the driver of the other car, attempted to push Caruso's vehicle to the side of the road. It was Hennessy's bad luck that a third car crashed into him, pinning him against the car he was trying to move off the highway. He suffered grievous injuries and, after weeks of treatment, his right leg was amputated just above the knee.
BUSINESS
March 18, 2013 | By Harold Brubaker, Inquirer Staff Writer
Thousands of U.S. entrepreneurs lost their businesses to the plunging economy and nervous lenders during the madness of the financial crisis. Former Villanova resident Maury Rosenberg was among them, but Rosenberg fought back against U.S. Bank affiliates and won court decisions in Philadelphia and Miami, where he lives in a downtown condo bought for $2.7 million in 2005. A Miami jury found this month in a $6.1 million verdict that U.S. Bank entities acted in bad faith in 2008 when they filed for involuntary bankruptcy against Rosenberg's Philadelphia medical imaging company.
NEWS
August 22, 2011 | By Charles Krauthammer
"We had reversed the recession, avoided a depression, got the economy moving again. ... But over the last six months, we've had a run of bad luck. " - President Obama, Aug. 15 A troubled nation wonders: How did we get mired in 9.1 percent unemployment, 0.9 percent growth, and an economic outlook so bad that the Federal Reserve pledges to keep interest rates at zero through mid-2013 - an admission that it sees little hope on the horizon? Bad luck, explains our president.
NEWS
November 24, 2010 | By MICHAEL HINKELMAN, hinkelm@phillynews.com 215-854-2656
A Democratic political consultant who organized get-out-the-vote operations on election days for local candidates was sentenced yesterday to five months in a federal lockup for filing a false tax return in 2006. U.S. District Judge Mary McLaughlin ordered Chester Fulton III, 54, of Narberth, to surrender to the Bureau of Prisons on Jan. 7. Upon release from prison, Fulton must serve a year of supervised release, with the first five months under house arrest. He must also pay the IRS more than $107,000 in back taxes, interest and penalties.
NEWS
June 24, 2009 | By Barbara Boyer INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Nicholas Anderson should be a multimillionaire. Instead, he is penniless - and in need of medical treatment he can't afford. On Dec. 23, 2004, Anderson was driving home to Atco when a tire caught on a six-inch lip on the roadside and he lost control of his car. The car crashed into a guardrail, which impaled the vehicle, severing Anderson's left leg and nearly severing his left arm. He was 18. He sued Camden County, and last year a...
NEWS
August 19, 2008 | By Joseph A. Slobodzian INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A federal judge has dismissed a petition for legal fees by a suburban businessman who was tried - and acquitted - in this year's fraud trial of T. Milton Street Sr. U.S. District Judge Legrome D. Davis ruled that there was no evidence federal prosecutors acted in bad faith when they decided to charge John H. Velardi Sr. with Street for allegedly defrauding a businessman who hoped to land a lucrative subcontract at Philadelphia International Airport....
NEWS
December 28, 2007 | By Dan Hardy INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The Pennsylvania Supreme Court has upheld state Education Secretary Gerald Zahorchak's decision to appoint a new governing board in the Chester Upland School District in March, replacing the Republican-dominated board that had run the district since 2003. The unanimous ruling was handed down yesterday; two justices filed a separate, concurring opinion. Zahorchak declared when he appointed the new board that the 4,200-student Chester Upland district had reestablished a sound financial structure.
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