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SPORTS
February 16, 1992 | By Glen Macnow, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Those who delight in others' bad news must be toasting to the week that San Francisco 49ers owner Edward DeBartolo Jr. just endured. First, DeBartolo had to fend off reports that he may be forced to sell the 49ers - the self-proclaimed "crown jewel" of his crumbling financial empire. There were revelations that roster moves - notably the decision to let Ronnie Lott and Roger Craig leave via Plan B last year - were dictated by DeBartolo's need to cut the payroll. Then, an acquaintance accused DeBartolo - who is married, with three daughters - of sexually assaulting her during a gathering at his home.
NEWS
August 2, 1987 | By Howard S. Shapiro, Inquirer Staff Writer
Good news for women: They are on the move. In the last two decades, studies show, more women are in the labor force than ever before; in fact, the nation's labor pool would be a weak skeleton of itself without them. They have more education than ever before. They have better opportunities mandated by law, even without the inclusion of an Equal Rights Amendment in the Constitution. Bad news for women: They may be essential to the workforce, but a huge number of them continue to labor in what could be called traditional women's occupations - which pay traditionally low wages.
NEWS
March 15, 2007
WE HATE TO SAY "we told you so," especially when it comes to our predictions of bad news. But the meltdown of the subprime-mortgage industry, including the troubles of one of its giants, New Century Financial, is grim news for Philadelphia. We take no joy from the fact that these events dovetail with this pages's long-standing concerns about subprime and predatory lending, as well as the high foreclosure rates in the city. This latest crisis in the banking industry will hit very close to home.
NEWS
September 4, 1992 | By Alissa Wolf, FOR THE INQUIRER
Rap. Techno-pop. Retro-punk and velcro-jumping. Mammoth margaritas, two- steppin' and X-rated piano players. Great, soon-to-be-great and formerly great names in rock and pop. Name the gimmick, and you can bet at least one Shore watering hole employed it to draw crowds this summer. And as far as the Shore's nightclub industry was concerned, this was a good news/bad news season. First, the bad news: Thanks to the awful economy, intensified drunken- driving laws and an aging population, business wasn't exactly brisk for a lot of Shore bars.
NEWS
July 31, 1989
There's always plenty of bad news coming out of City Hall these days. City Finance Director Betsy Reveal is estimating the city could face another budget deficit in the $100 million range if it doesn't get a lot of breaks. But don't head for the suburbs yet. Reveal was honestly admitting to how bad things might be - which is refreshing. And she also introduced a bit of good news. It's the city's new Budget Implementation Committee. This is the crew of senior city managers responsible for developing work plans for saving real money this year through solid managerial initiatives in every city operating department.
BUSINESS
April 27, 1987 | By Jennifer Lin, Inquirer Staff Writer
George Putnam 3d likes bad news. Really bad news. In his line of investing, there's nothing quite like a bankruptcy, industry collapse, mega-lawsuit or financial catastrophe to get him going. Putnam is a "turnaround" specialist. Solid investments like IBM and General Motors stock may be fine for some, but Putnam prefers finding out-of- favor securities that have the potential of regaining their past glory. Fallen angels, dogs, corpses, junk, losers: Whatever you call them, the stocks Putnam seeks are the same ones that big institutional investors toss out because they make portfolios look bad or because the institutions aren't allowed to hold such securities.
NEWS
December 22, 1995 | BY MIKE ROYKO
There was good news and bad news for Mieczyslaw Sokalski when he went to a federal office. The good news was that those offices were not shut down because of the Washington budget fight. The bad news was he would have been better off without the good news. Sokalski, 39, went as an interpreter for a Polish friend who had business at the Chicago offices of the U.S. Immigration and Naturalization Service. People already were standing in line, waiting to be admitted when there was room.
NEWS
July 7, 1995 | BY MIKE ROYKO
For Joe Loudd, there was good news and bad news. The bad news first: "Well, I got a letter today from the CHA telling me they don't think nothin' happened. " Joe, 55, was talking about his complaint that Chicago Housing Authority police grabbed him in a lobby of a Robert Taylor Homes building as part of what was supposed to be a random drug sweep. But instead, Joe says, all one of the cops was sweeping was whatever money he could grab. And Joe says the cop took $150 - his rent money - then charged Joe with disorderly conduct.
NEWS
June 17, 1990 | By Jean Redstone, Special to The Inquirer
Those critics of television who see the hours in front of the screen as wasted time should meet Vera Dodelin. She turned her feelings of frustration and helplessness at a barrage of bad news - hurricanes, homelessness, earthquakes - into an inspiring educational project. Dodelin, 41, of Lawnside, has taught special-needs classes for 18 years at the Radix Road Elementary School in Monroe Township. The 11 youngsters in her classroom range in age from 9 to 13. During the current school year, her students: Sent more than 300 canned goods to Puerto Rico and boxes of blankets, coats and warm clothing to South Carolina after Hurricane Hugo.
NEWS
May 17, 1996 | By Anthony R. Wood, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Contrary to what many people may believe, given the weather over the last six months, the meteorological summer begins in just two weeks. And contrary to what many people may expect, the odds favor another hot summer, according to the government's Climate Prediction Center. In releasing its June 1 to Aug. 31 outlook yesterday, it called for warmer-than-normal conditions over most of the East, including the Philadelphia region. The center, which is outside Washington, didn't guess on precipitation.
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