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Bad News

NEWS
January 20, 1992
We sometimes wonder if the nutrition research establishment isn't engaged in some sort of elaborate self-parody the theme of which is that nothing's safe to eat. The most recent disclosure, headlined in the Wall Street Journal last week, is that iron may be bad for you. Or at least too much iron can be, and a lot of Americans have too much. One reason that this hasn't been discovered before is that many of the symptoms of iron overload - liver damage, arthritis, diabetes, impotence and heart failure - are also associated with other syndromes.
BUSINESS
July 13, 2004 | By Porus P. Cooper INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Mutual-fund manager Kenneth G. Mertz 2d does not have Commerce Bancorp in his portfolio, but he can relate to the bank's shareholders who rushed for the doors after two of its executives were charged with fraud. Just over a year ago, Mertz had wasted no time selling all $1.5 million of Gold Bank stock in his fund's portfolio after the Kansas banking company's chief executive officer was accused of misappropriating funds. Mertz, manager of Emerald Banking & Finance Fund in Lancaster, sold the stock for a loss that day, when the price tumbled 10 percent.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 16, 2012 | By Carolyn Hax
Question: Any advice on how to keep bouncing back when life keeps sending bad news your way? I feel like that ambush scene in Bonnie and Clyde when the cops keep shooting way after Bonnie and Clyde have probably died. My father died of ALS in July, my mother has ovarian cancer and her chemo isn't working, our dog is 15 and on his last legs (no pun intended), and my freelance business is in the tank due to the recession. I'm talking with a therapist each week but still feel swallowed up by the never-ending crap tsunami.
NEWS
June 28, 1993 | by Kevin Haney, Daily News Staff Writer
Calvin Sharpe Sr. has been a textile worker for more than 25 years, the last at the Defense Department Clothing Factory in South Philadelphia. Now, his days as a government worker are numbered. Sharpe was among some 1,200 workers at the factory whom the federal base- closing commission yesterday decided to put out of work. "I'm sort of devastated," the West Philadelphia man said yesterday afternoon. "I couldn't see how they could do that. After all, they were familiar with what we did for Desert Storm . . . . Everyone got down, did 10 hours a day. It's like a slap in the face.
SPORTS
June 9, 1994 | by Paul Hagen, Daily News Sports Writer
Phillies righthander Curt Schilling threw in the bullpen yesterday, pitching off the mound for the first time since having a bone spur removed from his right elbow May 20. "I was really amazed at how well he threw the ball," manager Jim Fregosi said. "His elbow and shoulder were fine," club physician Dr. Phillip Marone said after examining Schilling in the trainer's room. "There is some bad news, however. " Of course there was . . . Schilling will have a magnetic resonance imaging exam of his left knee today at Thomas Jefferson University Hospital.
BUSINESS
January 15, 2012
"There's a fair amount of pessimism out there, but I also think that investors are slowly becoming immune to the bad news. As long as the stuff you can sink your teeth into, like corporate profit, is improving, I think it bodes well for the markets this year. " - Jack Ablin, of Harris Private Bank in Chicago, as earnings season got a positive launch by Alcoa Inc. "Despite the severe recession, and changes in the crude oil refining industry, the transportation cost savings from deepening the Delaware River remain very robust.
NEWS
November 17, 2004 | By Matthew Schofield INQUIRER FOREIGN STAFF
The appointment of Condoleezza Rice as secretary of state is bad news for the already fragile American-European relationship, European experts and commentators said yesterday. Newspaper editorials and interviews with specialists in U.S.-European relations lamented the departure of Colin L. Powell and predicted more tension between the Bush administration and European countries as a result. In Spain, the newspaper El Pais said, "The White House has lost its moderate face," while the Kommersant newspaper in Russia went further: "Now the hawks will attack us. " "Among the most pessimistic conjectures made when George W. Bush gained re-election was that with a mandate, he'd keep Donald Rumsfeld at the Pentagon and nominate Rice to replace Powell," the French newspaper Le Monde said.
BUSINESS
May 7, 2004 | By Wendy Tanaka and Josh Goldstein INQUIRER STAFF WRITERS
When should you tell the boss about bad news? As soon as possible, executives and management experts said yesterday as Defense Secretary Donald H. Rumsfeld felt the heat from his apparent failure to keep his boss informed. President Bush reportedly was not at all pleased that he learned about U.S. soldiers' abuse of Iraqi prisoners from television. The circumstances led some Democrats to call for Rumsfeld's resignation, but Bush declared yesterday that Rumsfeld would stay. It was the type of situation that should never be allowed to arise in a corporate setting, said Joseph W. "Chip" Marshall 3d, chairman and chief executive officer of the Temple University Health System.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 15, 2000 | By Joey Sweeney, FOR THE INQUIRER
For an artist who only recently has begun to hit his stride as a Great American Songwriter, Elliott Smith already has an impressive catalog of great songs about bad things. Playing to a sold-out crowd at the Trocadero Saturday, Smith - often hailed, or dismissed, as the indie-rock world's answer to Simon and Garfunkel - and his rollicking tour band flipped through that catalog, which is a sort of cross-country log book of relationships and misunderstandings. The arc goes like this: Portland, Ore., from whence Smith first emerges in the mid-'90s with a few batches of songs about drug addiction and backstabbing, such as "St. Ides Heaven" and "Ballad of Big Nothing.
BUSINESS
August 2, 2008 | By Jane M. Von Bergen INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Another grim report from the U.S. Department of Labor yesterday showed an economy in decline as the nation's payrolls shed 51,000 jobs in July and the unemployment rate climbed to 5.7 percent from 5.5 percent in June. The bad news was everywhere: More people working part time because they couldn't find full-time jobs. Higher-than-ever unemployment among teenagers, up to 20 percent. Longer periods of joblessness, with 19.1 percent still unemployed after six months.
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