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NEWS
October 3, 2012 | By Kevin Riordan, Inquirer Columnist
There was a song in 1994 called "A View of Camden" about a Philadelphia woman whose apartment overlooked the Delaware River and a New Jersey city she could hardly see. People living in Camden in 2012 say they, too, can barely recognize the city - particularly in recent headlines about horrifying crimes, floundering schools, and pervasive poverty. There's also that counter-intuitive plan to replace the city police department with a new county force. Posts on Facebook, YouTube and elsewhere bemoan the media's focusing on the city's potentially record-breaking homicide toll (48 so far this year)
NEWS
August 17, 2012 | ASSOCIATED PRESS
VAN BUREN TOWNSHIP, MICH. - Officers tasked with the grim job of notifying a woman about the death of her husband stumbled onto a grisly crime scene Thursday when no one responded at the suburban Detroit home, which had been left unlocked. Inside, the woman and the couple's two young children were found dead in separate bedrooms. Investigators were probing whether the man killed his family then committed suicide by driving the wrong way on an interstate highway in neighboring Indiana, instantly killing a stranger, too, as he slammed into the man's car. Police agencies in Michigan and Indiana spent the day trying to connect the dots.
NEWS
July 10, 2012 | By Paula Reed Ward, PITTSBURGH POST-GAZETTE
A Duke University study that examined the possibility that Marcellus Shale drilling in northeastern Pennsylvania contaminates drinking water concluded that pathways in rock formations that allowed salinated water into shallow aquifers were naturally occurring and not a result of hydraulic fracturing. Still, the authors warned in the study published Monday in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences that those naturally occurring pathways could allow chemicals and contaminated water caused by fracking also to travel into the drinking water supply.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 22, 2012 | Howard Gensler
Cartoonist Matt Groening is ending his syndicated comic strip "Life in Hell," the longtime staple of alternative newsweeklies.   Not because Groening ran out of ideas. The papers that ran the column ran out of money. According to Poynter.org, the final "Life in Hell" strip, the cartoonist's 1,669th, was published Friday. "I've had great fun, in a Sisyphean kind of way, but the time has come to let Binky and Sheba and Bongo and Akbar and Jeff take some time off," Groening told Poynter in an email Wednesday.
TRAVEL
April 1, 2012 | By Carol Pucci, SEATTLE TIMES
Cruise lines are using two-for-one deals, onboard ship credits, discounted airfares, "free" gratuities, even chocolate-dipped strawberries to jump-start business as they cope with a tsunami of bad news this year. First came safety fears raised by the January shipwreck of the Costa Concordia in Italy, then a fire aboard a sister ship, the Costa Allegra, in the Indian Ocean in late February. An outbreak of the norovirus forced a Princess Cruises ship to return to port. A group of cruise-ship passengers were robbed while on a nature hike near Puerto Vallarta, Mexico.
SPORTS
March 22, 2012 | DAILY NEWS WIRE REPORTS
CARDINALS ACE Chris Carpenter won't start Opening Day after a setback in his recovery from a bulging disk in his neck. The righthander returned to St. Louis on Tuesday for tests. He threw live batting practice Sunday but didn't feel right the next day. "He looked really good and felt good; the next day he just didn't respond like we had hoped," manager Mike Matheny said Wednesday. "His shoulder is just not responding and they're uncertain of the root of it. That's what they're trying to get to with tests on the neck and shoulder and trying to figure out where it's all coming from.
SPORTS
March 8, 2012
IT MIGHT have been imagination, but that Celtics locker room seemed to reek of liniment; maybe medicated powder; definitely, defeat. The cognoscente held that the gifted but aged Celtics would erode as the compressed, 66-game schedule progressed. Meanwhile, by similar logic, the younger, deeper Sixers, returned intact from a playoff appearance, would thrive at the Celtics' expense and supplant them atop the Atlantic Division. Still, somehow, the Celtics entered last night with five straight wins.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 16, 2012 | By Carolyn Hax
Question: Any advice on how to keep bouncing back when life keeps sending bad news your way? I feel like that ambush scene in Bonnie and Clyde when the cops keep shooting way after Bonnie and Clyde have probably died. My father died of ALS in July, my mother has ovarian cancer and her chemo isn't working, our dog is 15 and on his last legs (no pun intended), and my freelance business is in the tank due to the recession. I'm talking with a therapist each week but still feel swallowed up by the never-ending crap tsunami.
NEWS
February 8, 2012 | BY JOSH CORNFIELD, cornfij@phillynews.com 215-854-2893
GOV. CORBETT'S state budget unveiled yesterday doesn't include a miracle infusion of cash to help the Philadelphia School District out of its financial crisis. But it also doesn't include shocking cuts that would cap the district at the knees like last year's draconian budget from Harrisburg. Although statewide funding for education remained about the same as last year, the district stands to lose about $20 million from elimination of the accountability block grant program, according to estimates from lawmakers.
BUSINESS
January 15, 2012
"There's a fair amount of pessimism out there, but I also think that investors are slowly becoming immune to the bad news. As long as the stuff you can sink your teeth into, like corporate profit, is improving, I think it bodes well for the markets this year. " - Jack Ablin, of Harris Private Bank in Chicago, as earnings season got a positive launch by Alcoa Inc. "Despite the severe recession, and changes in the crude oil refining industry, the transportation cost savings from deepening the Delaware River remain very robust.
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