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Badminton

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SPORTS
June 2, 1996 | By Bob Ford, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Payday was always the worst, when the fearful chill would climb Han Qi's back as he stepped onto the dirty Manhattan streets hoping only for safe passage home. The Chinese restaurant where he worked didn't bother with payroll checks. Han would take the wad of cash and stuff it deep into one of his socks, leaving a $20 bill in his pants pocket. "If someone asked me for money, I figured I'd give them the 20 bucks and that would keep me from getting hurt," Han said. Staying safe wasn't easy.
SPORTS
May 21, 2004 | By Shannon Ryan INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
After Martin Luther King won its second straight Public League badminton championship yesterday, there was only one thing for the Cougars to do. So they kept their rackets in hand and played some more. Following a 3-2 victory over Northeast in a rematch of last year's title game - Martin Luther King athletes joined parents, former players from as many as 12 years ago and fellow students. King coach Malachi Cunningham stood back and smiled at the scene in the Cougars' gym, where a strong tradition has grown during his 12 years at the helm.
SPORTS
May 13, 1993 | By Frank Lawlor, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Badminton is the definition of an obscure high school sport. Most teenagers have never seen the game played, let alone participated. Games rarely attract fans, and their own classmates often do not know who the players are. Few outside the sport would know how to keep score without a lesson. Stephanie Iem and Lumei Cheung were no smarter about badminton, but with little more than the encouragement of Lamberton High coach Andrew Fairfax, they took up the sport four years ago. Now, they are completing a career as the most accomplished high school doubles team in the city.
SPORTS
May 23, 2003 | By Shannon Ryan INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Almost every day, Angeline Louis hears it from her big brother. Badminton isn't a real sport, he teases. Have you ever seen it on ESPN, he asks? Louis now has an answer for him - and everyone else who underestimates the sport. Yesterday, the Martin Luther King junior invited her brother Ruben Louis to the Public League championship match. He got a good showing. The Cougars beat visiting Northeast, 3-1, to claim the title for the first time in 20 years. Louis and partner Ashanna Driscol clinched the victory at No. 1 doubles, defeating Garwai Ng and Laura Draghiciu, 15-13, 17-16.
SPORTS
May 28, 1998 | By Nick Fierro, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Badminton was just a gym activity at Northeast High as recently as 1994, but all of a sudden the school is full of skillful players. Two of them, seniors Mercy George and Polina Mamontov, happen to be the best doubles team in the city. And last Thursday, they overcame Bok's Sagvenna Watts and Thorllie Hong, 15-8, 7-15 and 15-14 to help the Vikings gain their first Public League championship in the sport, 3-2 in just their fourth season of varsity action. "Before the season began, we wanted to win everything," said George.
NEWS
May 3, 1988 | By Michael Bamberger, Inquirer Staff Writer
The badminton showdown comes this week. After Thursday, somebody, some team, will know defeat. On that day, the two undefeated high school badminton teams from the Northeast will face off: the Washington Eagles and the Lincoln Railsplitters at Lincoln at 3 p.m. Both teams are 5-0. Be there, or miss the Northeast badminton match of the spring. Washington, coached by Eagles' football coach Ron Cohen, is perennially strong in badminton, so its 5-0 mark is no great surprise.
NEWS
November 22, 2011 | By Claudia W. Esbenshade, LANCASTER INTELLIGENCER JOURNAL-NEW ERA
ELIZABETHTOWN, Pa. - Every Tuesday afternoon, an enthusiastic group of men and women can be found lobbing a plastic ball over a lowered badminton net at the Elizabethtown Senior Center. The members of this group are playing pickleball, which is slowly gaining a devoted following among old and young looking for a low-impact sport. Pickleball even has a national organization and is an official game in the Senior Games. The game, named after the originator's dog, is a combination of tennis, badminton, and table tennis.
NEWS
June 9, 1988 | By Michael Bamberger, Inquirer Staff Writer
Lincoln High School's Railsplitters were defeated 5-0 by the powerhouse Central High School squad in the Public League badminton championship, held at Martin Luther King High School on Tuesday. It was just the second loss of the season for Lincoln, which was defeated in its regular season only by Central. Lincoln's final record is 10-2. Nineteen of the 20 players for Central were not born in the United States. Most of the players are from Asian countries, where badminton is much more popular than it is in the United States.
NEWS
October 18, 1993 | By Don Beideman, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
West Chester University's football team started against four opponents who were a combined 16-2 in the season's first five weeks. The fact that the Rams are 3-4 is due to the team's versatility, said coach Rick Daniel. Sure, junior quarterback Dave MacDonald is having a big year, along with Kodak All-America linebacker Lee Woodall and senior tailback Scott Eberly, but there have been some unexpected bonuses. "We've had several players step up for others," said Daniels, citing people such as Brian Sebold, a junior linebacker from Philadelphia's Father Judge High School; junior Montik Goodwin from Philadelphia's Frankford High; junior Scott Province from Marple Newtown; sophomore Matt Schultz from Washington Township, N. J., and redshirt freshman Dave Binder from Central Bucks West.
LIVING
September 13, 2000 | By Jennifer Weiner, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Say you have absolutely no athletic prowess. You are not particularly fast, not notably strong. You lack stamina, endurance and coordination, and are desperately afraid of heights. You're too slow to be a track star, too big to be a gymnast, too scared to even think about climbing to the top of the 10-meter platform, let alone jumping off. Peruse the rundown of this year's Summer Olympic events, though, and you may find yourself thinking: Somewhere - between the trampolining and the track-and-field, between the 33-year-old swimmers (Dara Torres, back for her fourth Olympics)
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SPORTS
August 15, 2012 | BY MARK PERNER, Daily News Staff Writer
VIGGLE, the popular loyalty program for television, polled its users who have been watching the Olympics intently. When asked which Olympian they might leave their spouse for, 61 percent of men and 60 percent of women proudly said they weren't interested. Thirty-six percent of Vigglers thought Andy Murray's win over Roger Federer was the biggest surprise of the Games. The cheating in badminton came in at 31 percent. Asked which Olympic sport they would like to compete in, 17 percent said badminton, followed by table tennis (16)
SPORTS
August 2, 2012 | ASSOCIATED PRESS
LONDON - Four badminton teams were kicked out of the women's doubles at the London Games on Wednesday for trying to lose on purpose, conduct that a top IOC executive said strikes at the heart of Olympic competition. The eight doubles players from China, South Korea and Indonesia were cited by the Badminton World Federation for "conducting oneself in a manner that is clearly abusive or detrimental to the sport. " "We have to be clear, there has been a problem here and we have to take that problem very seriously," BWF secretary general Thomas Lund said.
SPORTS
August 2, 2012 | From Inquirer Wire Services
Four badminton teams were kicked out of the women's doubles Wednesday for trying to lose on purpose, conduct that a top IOC executive said strikes at the heart of Olympic competition. The eight doubles players from China, South Korea, and Indonesia were cited by the Badminton World Federation for "conducting oneself in a manner that is clearly abusive or detrimental to the sport. " The eight disqualified players are world doubles champions Wang Xiaoli and Yu Yang of China and their South Korean opponents Jung Kyun-eun and Kim Ha-na, along with South Korea's Ha Jung-eun and Kim Min-jung, and Indonesia's Meiliana Jauhari and Greysia Polii.
SPORTS
May 4, 2012 | BY TOM MAHON, Daily News Staff Writer
FORMER GIANTS linebacker Harry Carson says he's not surprised by Junior Seau's tragic death, which has been ruled a suicide. "When I heard it, I have to say in the past I would have been shocked," Carson told the New York Post. "But I'm not shocked anymore. " It's too early to tell if Seau's death is linked to postconcussion syndrome, but Carson would not be surprised if that's the case. "I knew years ago that there would come a point in time where, whether it was transitioning to the game, or there would be guys having these neurological issues, that players were going to be committing suicide," said Carson, who has spoken out about his own battle with postconcussion syndrome and admitted that he has considered suicide.
NEWS
November 22, 2011 | By Claudia W. Esbenshade, LANCASTER INTELLIGENCER JOURNAL-NEW ERA
ELIZABETHTOWN, Pa. - Every Tuesday afternoon, an enthusiastic group of men and women can be found lobbing a plastic ball over a lowered badminton net at the Elizabethtown Senior Center. The members of this group are playing pickleball, which is slowly gaining a devoted following among old and young looking for a low-impact sport. Pickleball even has a national organization and is an official game in the Senior Games. The game, named after the originator's dog, is a combination of tennis, badminton, and table tennis.
SPORTS
May 21, 2004 | By Shannon Ryan INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
After Martin Luther King won its second straight Public League badminton championship yesterday, there was only one thing for the Cougars to do. So they kept their rackets in hand and played some more. Following a 3-2 victory over Northeast in a rematch of last year's title game - Martin Luther King athletes joined parents, former players from as many as 12 years ago and fellow students. King coach Malachi Cunningham stood back and smiled at the scene in the Cougars' gym, where a strong tradition has grown during his 12 years at the helm.
SPORTS
May 23, 2003 | By Shannon Ryan INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Almost every day, Angeline Louis hears it from her big brother. Badminton isn't a real sport, he teases. Have you ever seen it on ESPN, he asks? Louis now has an answer for him - and everyone else who underestimates the sport. Yesterday, the Martin Luther King junior invited her brother Ruben Louis to the Public League championship match. He got a good showing. The Cougars beat visiting Northeast, 3-1, to claim the title for the first time in 20 years. Louis and partner Ashanna Driscol clinched the victory at No. 1 doubles, defeating Garwai Ng and Laura Draghiciu, 15-13, 17-16.
SPORTS
December 23, 2002 | By Tim Panaccio INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Jeremy Roenick has one thing to say about the criticism he has been getting while serving a two-game suspension for Tuesday's illegal hit on Dallas center Mike Modano: "They can kiss my [behind] all they want; I could care less," Roenick fumed yesterday. The Flyers center will return to the lineup for tonight's game in Ottawa. "I've played this game 15 years and been suspended twice now," Roenick said. "People call me dirty, call me cheap. I play the game hard. If people don't like it, don't watch it. It's too bad. I'm not going to stop hitting.
NEWS
September 19, 2000 | By Frank Fitzpatrick, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The first question an American is likely to ask at a badminton match: What time will the burgers be ready? Once he's determined that the popular U.S. barbecue and picnic game is an honest-to-goodness Olympic sport, his next question no doubt will be: Why? Now it's true that once synchronized swimming - in which heavily made-up athletes compete against Busby Berkeley - entered the Olympics, the door was wide open. Trampolining was added for these 2000 Games, and there are movements to add everything from bowling to golf to shuffleboard.
LIVING
September 13, 2000 | By Jennifer Weiner, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Say you have absolutely no athletic prowess. You are not particularly fast, not notably strong. You lack stamina, endurance and coordination, and are desperately afraid of heights. You're too slow to be a track star, too big to be a gymnast, too scared to even think about climbing to the top of the 10-meter platform, let alone jumping off. Peruse the rundown of this year's Summer Olympic events, though, and you may find yourself thinking: Somewhere - between the trampolining and the track-and-field, between the 33-year-old swimmers (Dara Torres, back for her fourth Olympics)
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