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ENTERTAINMENT
November 23, 1990 | By Maria Gallagher, Daily News Restaurant Critic
You will not get the third-degree at the FBI at 25th and Olive streets in Fairmount. All they'll ask is what you want on your bagel. FBI stands for the just-opened Fairmount Bagel Institute. The sign says, "Home of the Bull Bagel. " What's a bull bagel? It's one with every topping on it - garlic, poppy seeds, onion, you name it. The supremely fresh bagels, 40 cents each, are the size of a small catcher's mitt, and they're softer than most bagels. Varieties include plain, onion, garlic, poppy seed, cinnamon raisin, pumpernickel and honey wheat.
SPORTS
September 30, 1988 | By M. G. Missanelli, Inquirer Staff Writer
Columbia comes to Pennsylvania tomorrow on a mission to snap its longstanding record for futility, 43 straight college football losses, but the bigger story on the Penn campus this week has been the great bagel ban of 1988. As part of a major security crackdown, spectators will be prohibited from carrying bagels into Franklin Field for tomorrow's 12:30 p.m. contest, for fear that tossed bagels would create a safety risk for spectators. It is a longstanding tradition at Penn to toss slices of toast from the stands during a particular lyric from the song "Drink a Highball.
NEWS
January 6, 1991 | By Robin Clark, Inquirer Staff Writer
For a lot of people who live near South Street, breakfast just won't be the same tomorrow. Oh, sure, they'll find another place that serves bagels. Maybe even fresh, chewy bagles, toasted to perfection and piled high with tomatoes and Swiss, lox and cream cheese, or Jewish salami and fried eggs. That's just food. But there's only one Ike Silverberg. And after today, the longtime proprietor of The Bagelry at 238 South St. is calling it quits. Never again will customers peer through the front window to see if Ike's odd schedule has brought him to work that day. Never again will they strain to read his hand-lettered signs touting such menu items as the "Swiss Murray" and the "Everything.
NEWS
November 15, 1987 | By Calvin Trillin
Sure, I was surprised when the administration found itself with a Supreme Court nominee who would have been rejected on grounds of past marijuana use if he had applied for a job as an assistant U. S. attorney. What surprised me was that after all the money Caspar Weinberger spent on up-to-date hardware, they still had petards over there. I can just see Ed Meese rummaging around in a little-used closet to find one. He pushes aside the boxes full of 1984 presidential speeches that question the guts and character of any Western nation that would sell so much as a pea-shooter to terrorist Iran.
NEWS
February 12, 1996 | By Gloria A. Hoffner, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Tell just about any marketing consultant about the operation at Ann's DoNut Shop here and you'd be likely to induce panic. In a world where bagels and muffins are cornering the leading shares of stomachs, Ann's serves only doughnuts. And in a consumer market driven by designer coffees and the ambiance of comfortable nooks, Ann's offers no drinks and is strictly take-out. But ask owner John Carpenter whether his shop at Sixth and Welsh Streets is about to be done in by coffee bars, and he laughs out loud.
NEWS
March 15, 1995 | For The Inquirer / TAMMY McGINLEY
The boxes contain bagels for a cause. Ken Gherardi (right) of Uptown Bagel Co. in Logan hands a box of bagels to John Rakus of Gloucester County Reclamation and Recovery Systems Inc. Uptown is offering to charitable organizations 380,000 bagels that taste good but are too small.
SPORTS
June 8, 1996 | THE INQUIRER STAFF
Who better to market baseball, a sport where the scoreboard frequently is dominated by zeros, than a guy who most recently sold doughnuts and bagels? Greg Murphy, who spent 22 years in the baking and food business, is expected to be announced next week as the sport's new marketing head. Murphy, 47, a U.S. Naval Academy graduate, joined General Foods Corp. in 1973. He became president of General Foods Bakery Co. in 1988 and was responsible for, among other brands, Entemann's pastries and Lender's bagels.
NEWS
December 26, 1992 | by Dave Bittan, Daily News Staff Writer
About 1,200 people, practically all of them Jews, had fun being Jewish at Christmas yesterday at the National Museum of American Jewish History. While they enjoyed programs by folk singers and storytellers and jugglers, the crowd wolfed down a whopping 220 dozen bagels. And they also guzzled gallons of apple juice at the eighth annual "Being Jewish at Christmas" session at the museum, 4th Street near Market. Christmas can be for Jews, since it's just another day to many of them while most Christians are having the times of their lives exchanging gifts in gaily decorated homes.
FOOD
September 13, 2000 | by Jonathan Takiff, Daily News Staff Writer
You love fat bagels, but not the hassle of extracting them from the jaws of a conventional toaster. You wanna warm up a pizza slice fast, without taking 15 minutes just to preheat the oven or suffering a slice that comes out all mushy from a microwave. Or maybe it's party time and there isn't room in the oven to bake up all the side dishes on your menu. Whatcha gonna do, to solve these dilemmas? Every year, more than 4 million Americans resolve these day-to-day crises by buying and plugging in a toaster oven - a compact (breadbox-sized or smaller)
BUSINESS
August 29, 1994 | By David I. Turner, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Owen Stern grew up in the bakery business, the son of a kosher baker in Rockland County, N.Y., and the great-grandson of a baker in Germany. But he loathed the idea of making a career in baking, of getting up at 2:30 every morning to prepare for the morning trade. Stern knew that small bakers didn't make much money, and that it was getting harder and harder to find the skilled bakers needed to run an old- fashioned mom-and-pop bakery. He wasn't the only baker's son or daughter who wanted to avoid those early mornings.
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FOOD
February 27, 2015 | By Michael Klein, For The Inquirer
Chestnut Street Philly Bagels  (1705 Chestnut St., 215-299-9920), in the former Tokyo Lunch Box across from the new Forever 21 store, is a brand-new offshoot of the popular South Street Philly Bagels, on Third Street south of South Street. Aaron Wagner, whose family of New York émigrés also owns the Bagel Spot in Cherry Hill, has brought in Jonathan Yamini as his business partner. For her restaurant-ownership debut, Sarah Levine has realized a longtime dream by setting up the quaint Luna Cafe (317 Market St., 215-309-3140)
FOOD
January 17, 2014 | By Samantha Melamed, Inquirer Staff Writer
To visit the Sweet Note Bagels bakery, a spare, 600-square-foot manufacturing space within the old Le Bus headquarters in Manayunk, you'll have to sign a nondisclosure form, or, at least, pledge not to reveal any trade secrets. After all, a good gluten-free bagel is hard to find, and even harder to make. And Sweet Note founder Michelle MacDonald, 28, has learned from experience that plenty of people would like to get their hands on her patent-pending process. Her company, which is 15 months old and run by three women under 30, is selling 5,000 bagels a week, serving 70 restaurants and shops in five states.
FOOD
November 29, 2012
Here is an excerpt from Craig LaBan's online chat from Nov. 27, 2012: Craig LaBan: Went to New York Bagel Bakery, the oldie off City Avenue that sits just behind the McDonald's (7555 Haverford Ave.), and found these bagel sticks. This place is often recommended to me by old-timers who make regular pilgrimages there. This is a classic bagel as it should be - perfect combo of light crunch on the exterior followed by a persistent central chew, then a lingering malty sweetness.
BUSINESS
November 13, 2012 | By Diane Mastrull, Inquirer Columnist
Mauro Daigle leaned forward in his chair, his face set in a no-nonsense expression, as he disclosed the highly sophisticated reasoning behind his and wife Annie Baum-Stein's decision to launch a business in their West Philadelphia neighborhood, where commercial enterprise wasn't exactly thriving. "Smoked salmon," he said. And bagels, Baum-Stein added. "You literally couldn't get bagels and smoked salmon" without getting in the car and driving to another part of the city, she said, deeming that "absolutely unacceptable.
SPORTS
September 4, 2012 | ASSOCIATED PRESS
NEW YORK - Didn't take long for Serena Williams to show her fourth-round opponent at the U.S. Open where things were headed. "The first point of the whole match," 82nd-ranked Andrea Hlavackova explained, "when I served, and she returned, like, a 100 mph forehand return, I was like, 'OK, I know who I'm playing. You don't have to prove it to me. I know.' " Monday's match was less than 15 seconds old. It might as well have been over. Dominant from the moment she ripped that return of an 88 mph second serve, forcing Hlavackova into an out-of-control backhand that sailed well long, to the moment she powered a 116 mph service winner on the last point, Williams extended her 2 1/2-month stretch of excellence with a 6-0, 6-0 victory to get to the quarterfinals at Flushing Meadows.
NEWS
July 13, 2012 | By Darran Simon, Inquirer Staff Writer
A civil suit filed by a South Jersey police officer who was targeted in 2010 when a Marlton deli cook put body hair in the officer's bagel sandwich as payback for a traffic arrest has been settled, the officer's attorney said Thursday. In September, Evesham Officer Jeremy Merck, 30, sued Good Foods to Go of Marlton; its corporate entity; and cook Ryan J. Burke, alleging that the deli was negligent for failing to keep its premises safe and properly examine the sandwich Burke served Merck on Feb. 20. The deli also failed to properly hire, train, and supervise its employees, the suit said.
NEWS
March 23, 2012
Murray Lender, 81, who helped turn his father's small Connecticut bakery into a national company credited with introducing bagels to many Americans, died Wednesday at a hospital in Miami from complications from a fall, his wife, Gillie Lender, said. The couple, who were married more than nine years, lived in Aventura, Fla., and also kept a home in Connecticut. Mr. Lender was perhaps best known from promoting Lender's Bagels in TV commercials. "He was courageous, strong and an example to everyone to show how one should go through life with a vision, ambition, a goal and with success," Gillie Lender said.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 22, 2011
EVERYBODY LOVES the food-trend story about the Next Big Thing. We love those list-y, breathlessly cheerful pronouncements of what's "best of" the city, of what the cool kids are eating and drinking, of what is - as they say - "hot. " And yet . . . how do I put this? Food trend stories about the Next Big Thing almost always suck. Maybe I'm just self-reflecting. Writers absolutely hate doing this sort of piece. If I list 10 trends, I'll be lucky if you agree with, like, two of them.
TRAVEL
May 22, 2011 | By Bill Reed, Inquirer Travel Editor
LEWISBURG, W.Va. - Peering in the windows of the Old Hardware Gallery, I can tell it is no ordinary screws-and-tools hardware store. There's handmade jewelry, West Virginia's own Blenko glassware, and Fiesta ceramic dinnerware. But the store is closed around 2:30 on this gray Tuesday afternoon in February. "It's on West Virginia time," a voice behind me says with a chuckle. Clutching a cup of coffee, Tina Owens easily introduces herself as "born and raised" in this six-block town of 3,830.
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