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Bait And Switch

NEWS
November 16, 1994 | By Dwight Ott, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The advertised sale price of the television set made it a real bargain, but when the South Jersey woman got to the American Appliance store in Runnemede, the salesman had some disappointing news: Not only was the set not in stock; it wasn't at any of the other stores in the chain, either. He offered her another set, but there was a catch: It cost $100 more. The woman, Carol Ferrante, didn't know it back in 1991, but she had just become another victim of the old "bait and switch," authorities say. State officials related that story and at least a half-dozen others like it in a 27-page complaint lodged yesterday against American Appliances Inc., a major appliance dealer based in Pennsauken.
BUSINESS
April 27, 2001 | By Linda Loyd INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Although American Appliance's financial problems surfaced publicly only this week, the company had been cited several times for alleged deceptive advertising by state consumer offices in Pennsylvania, New Jersey and Delaware in recent years. American Appliance and owner William C. Rowland Jr., have entered into voluntary court agreements with state attorneys general in Delaware, Pennsylvania and New Jersey since 1990. In the agreements, the company agreed to pay thousands of dollars in fines, restitution and penalties to settle allegations of "bait and switch" sales tactics and other misleading advertising charges.
NEWS
August 1, 2010 | By Christopher Elliott, TRIBUNE MEDIA SERVICES
Question: About a month ago, I took advantage of a Travelocity e-mail fare alert for a flight from Minneapolis to Costa Rica. The deal seemed too good to be true: $230 round-trip on US Airways. I booked the flight for my September honeymoon and then went to a website and bid on our accommodations, which I also booked. A few days ago, US Airways notified me that it had dropped a connecting flight to Costa Rica, and that our only option was a full refund. I checked the ticket prices to Costa Rica and found that they had tripled.
NEWS
August 20, 2012 | By Carolyn Hax
Question: My wife insists that we split our housework 50-50 and thinks it's sexist of me to resist that. I feel that since I do way more than 50 percent of a lot of other things - I work longer hours, make more money, spend less money, spend way more time with her family than she spends with mine, etc. - it's unfair for housework to be the one thing that gets split 50-50. Do you think housework has to be split evenly? What about things like earning money and doing work outside the home?
NEWS
November 25, 1994
One of the most popular clauses in the "Contract with America," which helped the Republicans take over the House for the first time in 40 years, was the promise of a congressional vote early next year on term limits. But brace yourselves, angry voters. Warning signs are cropping up that the GOP might play "bait and switch" on that clause. One was Newt Gingrich, the next Speaker of the House, saying he wants any term limit to have a "grandfather" clause so that it wouldn't apply to him - or anybody else who's already in Congress.
NEWS
March 21, 1990 | By Jim Smith, Daily News Staff Writer
A federal grand jury yesterday indicted two businessmen in connection with sales of fraudulent tax shelters connected with energy-saving devices in schemes that grossed more than $24 million from unwary investors. Michael F. Logar, 45, formerly of Wayne, who once sought to be cheesesteak king of Philadelphia, and Jerome A. Cadden, 38, an attorney and accountant from Tampa, Fla., were accused of conspiring to defraud the IRS by promoting a fraudulent tax shelter in 1984 and 1985.
NEWS
May 17, 2013 | By Philip Elliott, Associated Press
WASHINGTON - The days of fixed-rate student loans could be coming to a close, with House Republicans on Thursday advancing a proposal that would link rates to financial markets. The GOP-led House Education and the Workforce Committee sent to the full House a bill that would offer some students a better deal at first. Democratic critics warned that graduates would face steadily climbing rates and costs over the long haul if the markets change. "Our families deserve better than this bait and switch," said Rep. George Miller of California, the senior Democrat on the committee, who led the opposition.
NEWS
April 27, 2012 | Inquirer Editorial
It was refreshing to see primary voters in two Philadelphia legislative districts say no to politics as usual by rejecting an old-guard Democratic House member and turning away a newcomer who pinned her hopes on being the namesake daughter of the man who had held that office. The apparent defeat in the 182d District of State Rep. Babette Josephs, 71, not only paves the way for the election of Pennsylvania's first openly gay state lawmaker, but also served as savvy Center City voters' rejection of unsavory — not to mention silly — campaign tactics.
NEWS
June 9, 2010 | By Monica Yant Kinney, Inquirer Columnist
Anyone who's lived in Philadelphia for more than a minute knows that unless you're rich or connected, deals with City Hall should be conducted with one eyebrow raised and both hands on your wallet. Mayor John F. Street's much-ballyhooed Neighborhood Transformation Initiative (NTI) aimed to do right by the little guy. Vacant property would be seized by the city and turned over to decent folks. True urban pioneers would, for once, reap rewards for their troubles. Given NTI's hype - and $296 million in bond funding, $45 million of which has yet to be spent - can you blame sculptor Andrew Jevremovic and his wife, River Algiers Trappler, for dropping their guard?
REAL_ESTATE
June 4, 1993 | by Earni Young, Daily News Staff Writer
The Philadelphia area is one of the most competitive markets in the country for mortgage lenders - operating at a frenzied pace through a series of refinance booms since 1988. Business is good. So good, that new mortgage lending companies are springing up overnight. It doesn't take much. A few hundred bucks for a license and a telephone, and you're in business. It all sounds sadly familiar to Michael Vitali, president of the Pennsylvania Mortgage Bankers Association, who recalls the summer of 1987.
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