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Balch Institute

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NEWS
December 22, 2001 | By Stephan Salisbury INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Paving the way for creation of one of the largest independent research libraries in the country, Philadelphia Orphans' Court has approved the merger of the Historical Society of Pennsylvania and the Balch Institute for Ethnic Studies. The merger, in the works since April, when officials at the Balch broached the idea, will give researchers access to a vast trove of documents, printed materials and visual images covering the entire history of the country as well as the history and experience of its multicultural patchwork of peoples.
NEWS
August 7, 1991 | By Murray Dubin, Inquirer Staff Writer
If the Smithsonian Institution is America's attic, then the Balch Institute for Ethnic Studies is the area's cellar - the basement corner where you put all the stuff you don't know what to do with. The folks at Balch know what to do with it. They collect history - ethnic history, in particular. History that people often don't know is history. Take a peek in the Balch cellar: The showgirls with long hair and painted lips liked Henry Loo. Loo, a Chinese American, managed the Shangri La supper club on Chestnut Street in the early 1940s.
NEWS
April 21, 1990 | By Murray Dubin, Inquirer Staff Writer
The game cards depict a bumbling Irish maid. Other game cards show a black man saying "Yah, yah, I make the niggers run" as he chases monkeys. The Indian toy is named Hoppy Nutty Mad Indian. Throw a ball through the mouth of the Chinese laundryman target and win. Those are the old toys and games, some manufactured more than a century ago. Now there is Nomad, the snarling Arab enemy of the toy soldier Rambo. And Chutzpah, the board game where you can land on spaces marked "Get Nose Fixed" or "Marky's Bar Mitzvah with velvet yarmulkes.
NEWS
January 8, 2002
Know that familiar Temple University recruiting slogan, about students who "could have gone anywhere . . . "? Unfortunately, the same can be said for many of the historic artifacts, documents and images that make up the Philadelphia region's heritage. These days, those treasures could go anywhere - even to the highest bidder, with little regard for how the deal frays the area's cultural fabric. So when an agreement is struck that safeguards a vast piece of this patrimony, the news is, well, historic.
NEWS
November 8, 2004
Swarthmore lacrosse's 27-year unbeaten streak An Oct. 23 article titled "A bunch of girls who simply just can't lose" contained a list of longtime winning records in this area. All the records were impressive and deserving of note, but as the former women's lacrosse coach at the the former Swarthmore High School and elsewhere, I have received many calls from alumnae asking, "Where is our 27-year undefeated record?" Let me quote from a 1997 article from the (Media) Town Talk newspaper: "One of Delaware County's most unbelievable records belongs to the women's lacrosse program at the former Swarthmore High School.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 21, 1990 | By Ellen Goldman Frasco, Special to The Inquirer
Youngsters might not be able to roll around in piles of leaves yet, but they will be able to jump into big bundles of hay and participate in other autumnal activities at the annual Harvest Show this weekend at the Horticulture Center in Fairmount Park. Sponsored by the Pennsylvania Horticultural Society, this year's "Harvest Odyssey" features pumpkin-painting, apple-bobbing, leaf mask-making, parachute games, a farm animal display, recycling-tag games, furry friends from the Philadelphia Zoo, performances by clown Harley Newman and mime Barbara Gregson and more.
NEWS
May 21, 1993 | by Mark de la Vina, Daily News Staff Writer
PATHWAYS TO THE PAST. Pick up mini-bus at Balch Institute for Ethnic Studies, 18 S. 7th St., 1 p.m. every Saturday through July 3. Tickets: $3, free for members. Info: 925-8090, ext. 241 or 210. Enough with all the Independence Hall stuff. As the tourist industry tries to pass off the building as the quintessence of the city's history, consider these factoids: The Liberty Bell was adopted as a symbol of the Pennsylvania Abolition Society. Designed by Polish-American engineer Ralph Modjeski, the Ben Franklin Bridge was built primarily with Italian immigrant labor.
NEWS
December 22, 1995 | by Rose DeWolf, Daily News Staff Writer
In the original tale of the marionette Pinocchio, which Italian children learn in school, the little boy carved out of wood wears clothing made of wallpaper. His shoes are tree bark. His hat is half a loaf of Italian bread. A cricket advises him not to lie - if he does his nose grows longer - but, unlike the cricket in the Walt Disney version of the story, the Italian cricket has no first name. Not Jiminy Cricket. Not Giovanni Cricket. Just a helpful cricket. The original "Pinocchio" is the subject of a current exhibit at the Balch Institute for Ethnic Studies.
NEWS
February 14, 2007 | By Stephan Salisbury INQUIRER CULTURE WRITER
Kim Sajet, 41, a vice president at the Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts, has been named president and chief executive of the Historical Society of Pennsylvania. A native Australian, Sajet will succeed David Moltke-Hansen, who is retiring after running the 183-year-old society for the last eight years. "After conducting a national search and considering a number of highly qualified candidates, we found Kim was far and away the best person to lead HSP," Collin McNeil, society board chairman, said in a statement.
NEWS
May 30, 2002 | By Stephan Salisbury INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The former home of the Balch Institute of Ethnic Studies is for sale. Asking price: $5.8 million. The sale is the result of the merger of the Balch, at 18 S. Seventh St., with the Historical Society of Pennsylvania, said David Moltke-Hansen, the historical society's president and chief executive. Within a year or so, the entire Balch library collection of 3 million manuscripts, 60,000 books, and 12,000 graphics related to the ethnic and immigrant experience in the Philadelphia area will be housed at the historical society, at 1300 Locust St. The five-story, 85,000-square-foot Balch building, designed by H2L2 Architects, opened in 1976 as part of the city's Bicentennial festivities.
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LIVING
May 18, 2007 | By David Iams FOR THE INQUIRER
The Balch Institute for Ethnic Studies' absorption into the Historical Society of Pennsylvania will go into its final phase Thursday, when Alderfer Auction Co. starts selling off the artifacts, memorabilia and clothing that came with the deal. In its heyday, the Balch was a prominent civic institution celebrating the city's ethnic diversity. All told, Thursday's auction - beginning at 9 a.m. at 501 Fairgrounds Rd., Hatfield - will consist of 500 uncataloged lots of acquisitions and possessions not kept by the society or transferred to other ethnic museums and local institutions.
NEWS
February 14, 2007 | By Stephan Salisbury INQUIRER CULTURE WRITER
Kim Sajet, 41, a vice president at the Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts, has been named president and chief executive of the Historical Society of Pennsylvania. A native Australian, Sajet will succeed David Moltke-Hansen, who is retiring after running the 183-year-old society for the last eight years. "After conducting a national search and considering a number of highly qualified candidates, we found Kim was far and away the best person to lead HSP," Collin McNeil, society board chairman, said in a statement.
NEWS
November 8, 2004
Swarthmore lacrosse's 27-year unbeaten streak An Oct. 23 article titled "A bunch of girls who simply just can't lose" contained a list of longtime winning records in this area. All the records were impressive and deserving of note, but as the former women's lacrosse coach at the the former Swarthmore High School and elsewhere, I have received many calls from alumnae asking, "Where is our 27-year undefeated record?" Let me quote from a 1997 article from the (Media) Town Talk newspaper: "One of Delaware County's most unbelievable records belongs to the women's lacrosse program at the former Swarthmore High School.
NEWS
October 31, 2004 | By Mary Anne Janco INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
The photographs show a young musician from Panama following her dreams, a Colombian family who own a sewing machine business celebrating Christmas Eve together, and a vigil for a Puerto Rican teenager, the victim of a drive-by shooting in South Philadelphia. The walls of the Baldwin School art gallery are lined with images of the joy and struggles in the lives of Latino families who have made their home in Philadelphia and its suburbs. "Latino Philadelphia: Our Journeys, Our Communities," a bilingual exhibit, showcases the rich cultures of this diverse group, looks back at the historical trading ties between Philadelphia and the Latino world, and provides a glimpse of the hardships endured by the early immigrants.
NEWS
May 30, 2002 | By Stephan Salisbury INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The former home of the Balch Institute of Ethnic Studies is for sale. Asking price: $5.8 million. The sale is the result of the merger of the Balch, at 18 S. Seventh St., with the Historical Society of Pennsylvania, said David Moltke-Hansen, the historical society's president and chief executive. Within a year or so, the entire Balch library collection of 3 million manuscripts, 60,000 books, and 12,000 graphics related to the ethnic and immigrant experience in the Philadelphia area will be housed at the historical society, at 1300 Locust St. The five-story, 85,000-square-foot Balch building, designed by H2L2 Architects, opened in 1976 as part of the city's Bicentennial festivities.
NEWS
January 8, 2002
Know that familiar Temple University recruiting slogan, about students who "could have gone anywhere . . . "? Unfortunately, the same can be said for many of the historic artifacts, documents and images that make up the Philadelphia region's heritage. These days, those treasures could go anywhere - even to the highest bidder, with little regard for how the deal frays the area's cultural fabric. So when an agreement is struck that safeguards a vast piece of this patrimony, the news is, well, historic.
NEWS
December 22, 2001 | By Stephan Salisbury INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Paving the way for creation of one of the largest independent research libraries in the country, Philadelphia Orphans' Court has approved the merger of the Historical Society of Pennsylvania and the Balch Institute for Ethnic Studies. The merger, in the works since April, when officials at the Balch broached the idea, will give researchers access to a vast trove of documents, printed materials and visual images covering the entire history of the country as well as the history and experience of its multicultural patchwork of peoples.
NEWS
May 1, 2001 | By Stephan Salisbury INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
In the latest sign of consolidation in the cultural community, the Historical Society of Pennsylvania and the Balch Institute for Ethnic Studies have agreed to combine their operations in a "strategic alliance" that will create an archival trove covering the life of the United States from colonial beginnings to present-day diversity. The exact form of the combination - merger, partnership, coalition - remains to be worked out, according to officials from both organizations. But both the historical society and Balch boards have given the green light to proceed and will meet separately on May 21 to consider the preliminary details now being discussed.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 21, 2000 | By James Rutherford, FOR THE INQUIRER
Adab Ibrahim, a Philadelphian of Arab descent, chooses to confront the dilemma faced by Muslim women in America who desire to be true to their faith but have decided not to submit to the veil. She writes in reverential terms of hijab, the Islamic tradition requiring women to cover their heads in public. Under its "protection," as she calls it, a woman "is not perceived for her good or bad looks or her choice of fashionable clothes. She is taken for her intelligence and good moral character.
NEWS
August 11, 1999 | By Virginia Lam, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A neighborhood located between Old City and Society Hill - rich in history and national landmarks - is getting a new resident, much to the delight of the community. A branch of the Free Library of Philadelphia is scheduled to open next June at the Balch Institute for Ethnic Studies at 18 S. Seventh St. Residents are cheering the addition, which has been in the works for almost two decades. "It's an idea that has been around for a long time," said Liza Seltzer, of the East Philadelphia Coalition for a Free Library Branch.
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