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June 23, 2006 | Daily News Wire Services
E-mails seized by federal authorities identify Victor Conte, the convicted founder of the Bay Area Laboratory Co-Operative as a source in the San Francisco Chronicle's reporting on the steroids scandal, according to an online court filing that accidentally revealed confidential information. The filing details exchanges between Chronicle reporter Mark Fainaru-Wada and Conte. It was unclear from the filing whether Conte provided the reporters with grand jury transcripts, but it does show Conte discussing the testimony of athletes about their steroid use. Beginning in 2004, the Chronicle published a series of stories citing the grand jury testimony of Giants slugger Barry Bonds, Yankees star Jason Giambi and others.
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February 15, 2007 | Daily News Wire Services
Two San Francisco Chronicle reporters will avoid jail time after a criminal defense lawyer agreed to plead guilty to leaking them secret grand-jury documents from the BALCO steroids investigation. Attorney Troy Ellerman admitted in court papers filed yesterday that he allowed reporters Lance Williams and Mark Fainaru-Wada to view transcripts of the grand-jury testimony of baseball stars Barry Bonds, Jason Giambi, Gary Sheffield and sprinter Tim Montgomery, according to court documents.
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August 27, 2004 | Daily News Wire Services
Marion Jones has been in an ebullient mood at Olympic Stadium, but she wasn't happy with her ex-coach Trevor Graham's admission that he supplied the evidence of drug use to the BALCO investigators. Shortly after his pupil, Justin Gatlin, won gold in the 100 meters Saturday, Graham said he had supplied the syringe to authorities. "I thought it was Justin's night to shine," Jones said yesterday. "I didn't think it was right for him [Graham] to take attention away from him, since he had just won the gold medal.
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July 13, 2007 | Daily News Wire Services
An attorney who admitted leaking the confidential grand jury testimony of Barry Bonds and other athletes to a reporter was sentenced yesterday to 2 1/2 years in prison. Troy Ellerman, 44, pleaded guilty in February to allowing a San Francisco Chronicle reporter to view transcripts of testimony by Bonds, Jason Giambi, Gary Sheffield and other athletes embroiled in the steroids investigation. Giambi admitted taking steroids while Sheffield and Bonds testified if they did take performance enhancing drugs, they did so unwittingly.
SPORTS
December 2, 2004 | THE INQUIRER STAFF
A federal judge in San Francisco said yesterday that she would not immediately dismiss charges against four men accused of distributing steroids to top athletes. The ruling by Judge Susan Illston came in a case that has cast a cloud of suspicion over records set by Barry Bonds and other athletes in recent years. Her decision was in response to accusations that prosecutors illegally searched a nutritional supplement laboratory and the house and car of the trainer for Bonds.
SPORTS
April 25, 2004 | By Joe Juliano INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Olympic gold medalist Marion Jones denied any knowledge yesterday of a check from her bank account that reportedly had been sent to Victor Conte, the founder of a San Francisco company that is at the center of an investigation into performance-enhancing drugs. Speaking yesterday after running the anchor leg of the victorious 4x100- and 4x200-meter relay teams in the "USA vs. The World" competition at the Penn Relays, Jones said she "never signed, endorsed, agreed upon or sent any check" to the Bay Area Laboratory Co-Operative (BALCO)
SPORTS
June 17, 2004 | FROM INQUIRER WIRE SERVICES
Olympic champion Marion Jones admitted yesterday that she received a mineral supplement provided by Balco, the company at the center of a federal doping probe, but again denied taking any steroids and issued a defiant plea for a public hearing to clear her name. After telling a news conference she had never used any product from the nutritional lab Balco, she conceded that she had received Balco's zinc supplement ZMA between 1999 and 2001. The owner of Balco, Victor Conte, and his deputy who heads the division selling ZMA, James Valente, have been charged with distributing steroids.
SPORTS
November 8, 2003 | THE INQUIRER STAFF
A 19-year-old man arrested in the death of a Cincinnati Reds outfielder told police he was involved, according to court documents released yesterday. Reginald Riddle of Harvey, Ill., made an initial court appearance in Phoenix yesterday. He was arrested on suspicion of first-degree murder, armed robbery, kidnapping and burglary but wasn't charged. According to court records, Riddle said in an interview with police that he was involved in the death of Reds outfielder Dernell Stenson.
SPORTS
May 18, 2004 | By Frank Fitzpatrick INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
With the Olympic trials and the Games themselves closing in on them like fast-charging competitors, some of the biggest names in American track are trying to outrun lingering concerns about drug abuse in their sport. Yesterday, defending 100-meter Olympic champion Maurice Greene said the need to restore track's image in the wake of a California steroid scandal was so great that he would devote his 2004 season to that goal. "Yes, there's a lot of negative things around our sport right now," Greene said.
SPORTS
October 6, 2004 | Daily News Wire Services
New York Yankees star Gary Sheffield will not be penalized by the commissioner's office after his admission that he unknowingly used a cream 2 years ago that contained illegal steroids. Sports Illustrated reported in this week's issue that the New York outfielder was supplied a cream by BALCO, the California lab at the center of a federal probe into illegal steroids distribution. Sheffield said he applied the cream on his surgically repaired right knee in 2002. He was not told it contained an illegal steroid, the magazine said.
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June 21, 2012 | By Bob Ford, Inquirer Columnist
Baseball's fabulous era of flagrant steroids abuse, which was accompanied during its heyday with loud cracks of the bat and perhaps a little extra pop in the catcher's mitt, came to a much quieter end Monday in a federal courtroom in Washington. As demonstrated by Freddy Galvis, who was busted for having a trace amount of a banned steroid metabolite in his system, there is still cheating going on, but the Wild West days are over. Whether Galvis is red-handed guilty or the unwitting victim of a juiced supplement doesn't matter.
SPORTS
December 15, 2011 | Associated Press
Barring an appeal, the sentencing of Barry Bonds on Friday in a San Francisco courtroom will bring the federal government's nearly decade-long investigation of a Northern California-based steroids ring to an anticlimactic end. Federal guidelines suggest a prison sentence of 15 to 21 months and prosecutors want the home-run record holder to serve time - but federal probation officers have recommended probation and a period of house arrest....
SPORTS
March 19, 2011 | Daily News Wire Services
An anti-doping arbitration panel has suspended agent and coach Mark Block for 10 years after finding he trafficked in drugs supplied by BALCO and gave them to his wife, sprinter Zhanna Block. In hearings last December, the arbitration panel heard testimony from Jeff Novitzky, a key investigator into the doping scandal at the Bay Area Lab Co-Operative that landed a number of athletes in trouble, including Barry Bonds, who goes on trial next week for perjury. The arbitrators' ruling, announced yesterday by the U.S. Anti-Doping Agency, said Block tried to mislead them about his involvement with BALCO and its founder, Victor Conte.
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June 4, 2009 | Daily News Staff and Wire Reports
Bank of America will walk away from its sponsorship with the U.S. Olympic Committee unless the federation finds a way to provide more bang for the 12 million bucks it spends supporting American athletes. USOC chief marketing officer Lisa Baird told the Associated Press she received that unexpected message from the bank last Friday, putting the future of one of its most important sponsorship deals in jeopardy. Home Depot and General Motors already have declined to renew long-term sponsorships with the USOC, and Bank of America could be next.
SPORTS
April 24, 2009 | By Frank Fitzpatrick INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Marion Jones could not bear to have her children visit in prison. The partings, she knew, would be too painful. But even on those nights when she missed her two young sons the most, the jailed track star knew there were some in that Texas women's prison who hurt more. "All I had to do was look at my neighbor and see that she had been in 15 years," said Jones, who wept at that memory last night during a talk sponsored by the University of Pennsylvania's Center for Africana Studies, "and know that her kids hadn't seen her in 15 years.
SPORTS
November 27, 2008 | THE INQUIRER STAFF
Thousands of pages of grand jury testimony related to the long-running steroids investigation of Barry Bonds and other athletes were unsealed yesterday by U.S. District Court Judge Susan Illston in San Francisco. Illston signed an order that allows prosecutors to share grand jury transcripts, medical lab reports and search warrant affidavits with Bonds' lawyers. The documents will not be made public, according to Jack Gillund, a spokesman for U.S. Attorney Joseph Russoniello. Roger Clemens has been asked to end his involvement with a charity golf tournament in Houston he has hosted for four years as the fallout from the Mitchell Report continues to haunt the seven-time Cy Young Award winner, the New York Daily News reported yesterday.
SPORTS
May 30, 2008 | THE INQUIRER STAFF
A San Francisco jury yesterday convicted track coach Trevor Graham on one count of lying to federal investigators about his relationship to an admitted steroids dealer but deadlocked on two other charges when at least one juror had doubts about the credibility of the prosecution's star witness. Graham was charged with three counts of lying to federal agents. This marked the first significant setback at trial for the federal government in its nearly five-year investigation stemming from the Bay Area Laboratory Co-Operative doping scandal.
NEWS
January 12, 2008 | By Frank Fitzpatrick INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Sprinter Marion Jones, who lost her credibility and her Olympic medals when she admitted to lying about her use of performance-enhancing substances, yesterday lost her freedom. A federal judge in New York sentenced Jones, once America's brightest track star, to six months in prison for lying to a grand jury about her steroid use and for check fraud. Jones' sentence, the harshest U.S. District Judge Kenneth Karas could administer under her plea bargain's terms, is to begin March 11, nearly eight years after she won three gold and two bronze medals in the Sydney Olympics.
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December 11, 2007 | Daily News Wire Services
BALCO founder Victor Conte is ready to meet with the World Anti-Doping Agency chairman to "provide detailed information involving a history of rampant drug use at the elite level of sport. " Conte, who pleaded guilty to operating a steroids distribution ring at the Bay Area Laboratory Co-Operative, said yesterday in an e-mail that he plans to meet with Dick Pound tomorrow in New York. "Ironically, I feel it's some of the poor decisions and past mistakes I've made that uniquely qualifies me to make a contribution," Conte said.
SPORTS
July 13, 2007 | Daily News Wire Services
An attorney who admitted leaking the confidential grand jury testimony of Barry Bonds and other athletes to a reporter was sentenced yesterday to 2 1/2 years in prison. Troy Ellerman, 44, pleaded guilty in February to allowing a San Francisco Chronicle reporter to view transcripts of testimony by Bonds, Jason Giambi, Gary Sheffield and other athletes embroiled in the steroids investigation. Giambi admitted taking steroids while Sheffield and Bonds testified if they did take performance enhancing drugs, they did so unwittingly.
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