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Bald Eagles

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NEWS
December 20, 2011 | By Jacqueline L. Urgo, Inquirer Staff Writer
NEWPORT, N.J. - In 1981, in a swampy no-man's-land in southern Cumberland County, experts spied New Jersey's only known pair of mated bald eagles and feared they might be its last. Now, state biologists are heralding a milestone: There are more than 100 pairs of American bald eagles nesting in the Garden State, according to data released last week by the New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection. Eighteen of the state's 21 counties have at least one active nest, officials report.
NEWS
July 8, 2013 | Associated Press
Call it a comeback. The Pennsylvania Game Commission reported last week that the state's bald eagle population has reached new heights, with more than 250 active nests. Several nests and birds have been spotted in York County, proving that efforts to restore the endangered species have been successful, said Karen Lippy, president of the Codorus Bird Club. "Any time you see one flying is exciting. It never gets boring. They're a national symbol," she said. About 30 years ago, the national symbol's future in Pennsylvania seemed nonexistent.
NEWS
July 19, 2007 | By Kimberly Lengel
There may be no better place to celebrate the recent removal of bald eagles from the list of endangered and threatened species than Philadelphia. After an embattled 40-year effort, bald eagles have recovered from the disastrous trifecta that almost spelled their doom: DDT, habitat destruction, and over-hunting. Thanks to protection under the Endangered Species Act and the combined recovery efforts of federal, state, and local conservation organizations, there are now almost 10,000 nesting pairs of eagles in the contiguous United States - a stunning increase from the 417 in 1963.
NEWS
July 14, 2003 | By Don Sapatkin INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
After 20 years of dogged work to reintroduce DDT-decimated bald eagles, wildlife biologists in Pennsylvania and New Jersey have had some major successes, although this was not a landmark year. Five new nesting pairs were reported in each state this spring, a decline for both. Bald eagles like to build nests in hard-to-reach places, and are sensitive to disturbances (particularly from people) and extreme weather. The decline was attributed to both factors. "It's been kind of a tough year for eagles, but they're holding their own," said Dan Brauning, the biologist who oversees the Pennsylvania Game Commission's eagle and falcon programs.
SPORTS
February 13, 1994 | By Stephen J. Morgan, FOR THE INQUIRER
The New Jersey Division of Fish, Game and Wildlife says its efforts to increase the number of bald eagles in the state are reaping benefits. Officials said 96 eagles were counted during the agency's annual winter survey, 22 more than were observed last year. The survey was conducted on Jan. 8 and Jan. 9 by volunteer bird enthusiasts on behalf of the division's Endangered and Non-Game Species Program. Larry Niles, the program's chief, said that the survey focused on areas known to have eagle populations in winter and that the count represents eagles actually seen by the volunteers.
NEWS
November 22, 1998 | By Raad Cawthon, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Over the chilly gray waters of the Mississippi River, a bald eagle rides the brisk currents of rising air in huge, lazy circles. As it turns against the dark trees, the broad white tail and snowy head of America's symbol are clearly visible. This eagle, seemingly soaring for sport on an increasingly nasty late-autumn day, is part of a glowing ecological success story in Iowa. Bald eagles remain an endangered species here, but that is changing: In recent years the birds have returned to nest at a rate far greater than wildlife biologists once thought possible.
NEWS
January 13, 1997 | By Eric Dyer, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
At 7:23 yesterday morning, Shirley and Paul Lamson parked their truck on the side of a narrow country road and waited in the bitter cold for the bald eagles to appear. For more than three years, the couple has kept watch over an eagle's nest high atop a tree along Horne Run. The Lamsons are devoted to the male and female who live in the nest, and drive more than 20 miles from their Gloucester County home several times each week to see them. As the orange sun rose from behind a clump of trees, the eagles became visible as they perched in their nest, basking in dawn's early light.
NEWS
March 19, 2004 | By Joseph A. Gambardello INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A survey in January counted 178 bald eagles in New Jersey, a record for modern times and another indication of the bird's population rebound, the state said yesterday. In releasing the results of the annual midwinter survey, Environmental Commissioner Bradley Campbell credited the protection of bald-eagle nests to the work of volunteers who monitor them for state wildlife biologists. "Despite its continued endangered status, the bald eagle is one of New Jersey's great success stories in endangered-species protection and management," Campbell said.
BUSINESS
April 10, 2007 | By Henry J. Holcomb INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Bald eagles - the first to nest in the city in 200 years - still soar over the Navy Yard site where both the port and the Philadelphia Regional Produce Market have rival plans to build massive new facilities. All work toward beginning construction of the produce terminal this summer has stopped. Gov. Rendell's press office would say only that "planning is now focused on the eagles, which will impact any project on the east end of the Navy Yard. " While the eagles may have halted the bulldozers, they have not stopped the debate over where the produce market should go. Thomas J. Holt Jr., who with his brothers runs the port's largest terminals, wants the governor to get everybody into a room behind closed doors to figure out how to expand the port and meet the produce market's needs.
NEWS
July 14, 2003 | By Joseph A. Gambardello INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
It took more than an hour tromping through mosquito- and tick-infested woods along the Delaware River in Gloucester County, and a trip 60 feet up a tree, to get Elmer Clegg his big payoff. Clegg is a volunteer eagle's nest monitor for the New Jersey Division of Fish and Wildlife, and this month he did something he had never done in a dozen years of watching: He cradled a bird that had hatched in one of his nests. And not just one new bald eagle, but two - a brother and a sister that Clegg's wife, Bunny, had named Duke and Daisy without knowing their sexes.
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SPORTS
February 14, 2014 | From Staff and Wire Reports
Tyler Ennis hit a 35-footer at the buzzer to help No. 1 Syracuse remain unbeaten with a 58-56 road win over No. 25 Pittsburgh on Wednesday night. Syracuse (24-0, 11-0 Atlantic Coast Conference) remained one of two undefeated teams in Division I along with Wichita State. With 4.4 seconds remaining and the Orange down by 1, Ennis caught the inbounds pass and dribbled up the court before hitting the shot over two defenders. Talib Zanna, who led Pitt (20-5, 8-4) with 16 points and 14 rebounds, had given Pitt a 56-55 lead with 4.4 seconds left after he hit two free throws.
NEWS
August 16, 2013 | By Sandy Bauers, Inquirer Staff Writer
Wildlife officials keep ticking off milestones in the recovery of the bald eagle. Pennsylvania is poised to upgrade the bird's status, and New Jersey will likely begin a similar process next year. The Pennsylvania Game Commission biologist who heads the eagle program is recommending that the bird be removed from the state's threatened species list. Its recovery has been so "spectacular and widespread" that it "no longer meets the definition of threatened in the state," said Doug Gross.
NEWS
July 8, 2013 | Associated Press
Call it a comeback. The Pennsylvania Game Commission reported last week that the state's bald eagle population has reached new heights, with more than 250 active nests. Several nests and birds have been spotted in York County, proving that efforts to restore the endangered species have been successful, said Karen Lippy, president of the Codorus Bird Club. "Any time you see one flying is exciting. It never gets boring. They're a national symbol," she said. About 30 years ago, the national symbol's future in Pennsylvania seemed nonexistent.
NEWS
November 24, 2012 | By Mari A. Schaefer, Inquirer Staff Writer
OAKWOOD, Md. - With its intimidating powerhouse and forbidding arsenal of steel, concrete, and cables, the Conowingo Dam isn't on anyone's list of natural attractions. But right now, it is one of the most attractive venues in the country for the once-endangered American bald eagle. On their way south, the majestic birds with their distinctive white heads and tails are congregating at the dam, about 10 miles south of the Pennsylvania border along the Susquehanna River, where they will spend the next few months.
NEWS
May 13, 2012 | By Jan Hefler, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Soon after workers finished creating scenic trails along the Delaware, Delanco's town lawyer received surprising news: The state agency that usually champions such projects was seeking a court order to stop it. The New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection, a vast agency that advocates for nature and open space, was fulfilling its less-popular duty of selecting places to deposit the river's murky dredge spoils. Delanco's new park was a designated dump. The river needs periodic dredging to improve navigation, and the DEP's site selection for spoil deposits often leads to clashes with affected towns.
NEWS
April 29, 2012 | By Sandy Bauers, Inquirer Staff Writer
The bald eagle was lying on its back in a pool of blood in, of all places, a Broomall parking lot. Joe Simmonds, the maintenance man at Congregation Beth El-Ner Tamid, spotted its dark form as he emptied trash into a Dumpster. He put a traffic cone by the huge bird so no one would run over it, and he called 911. The bird was breathing. It was alive, just barely. Wildlife officials trying to coax it back to health now think the male eagle was beset by a triple dose of misfortune.
NEWS
December 20, 2011 | By Jacqueline L. Urgo, Inquirer Staff Writer
NEWPORT, N.J. - In 1981, in a swampy no-man's-land in southern Cumberland County, experts spied New Jersey's only known pair of mated bald eagles and feared they might be its last. Now, state biologists are heralding a milestone: There are more than 100 pairs of American bald eagles nesting in the Garden State, according to data released last week by the New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection. Eighteen of the state's 21 counties have at least one active nest, officials report.
SPORTS
December 11, 2011 | The Inquirer Staff
  Kate Dellinger poured in 31 points for Widener as the Pride (5-3) grabbed a 78-70 win over Eastern (6-2) in St. Davids on Saturday. Meghan Nowak had 23 points and 11 rebounds to lead the Eagles. Ursinus 68, Dickinson 61 - Lindsay Teuber (St. Basil's) and Alli Rosati (Central Bucks East) each had 15 points as the Bears (4-4, 3-2 Centennial) beat the Red Devils (1-9, 1-4) in Collegeville. Clarion 68, Cheyney 45 - Ann Deibert had 15 points to lift the Eagles (2-6, 2-4 PSAC)
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