CollectionsBaldwin School
IN THE NEWS

Baldwin School

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
September 2, 1993 | By Andy Wallace, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Rosamond Cross, 86, the frail and courageous woman who headed the Baldwin School in Bryn Mawr for 29 years, died Tuesday at her home in Waverly Heights, Gladwyne. "The Baldwin School was her main love in life," said her niece Jean Nick. "Even after she retired, she was there full time. " Today, 23 years after her retirement in 1970, her presence remains at the all-girl school. The Rosamond Cross Science Building is named in her honor, and the Rosamond Cross Endowed Teaching Chair was established in 1988 to reward outstanding teachers.
NEWS
January 17, 1993 | By Joyce Vottima Hellberg, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
The Baldwin School has been awarded a $403,000 grant to increase educational opportunities for students of color on its campus and at four other Main Line independent schools. The grant, one of eight totaling $3.09 million nationwide, is from the DeWitt Wallace-Reader's Digest Foundation in New York and was awarded through its Independent School Opportunity Program. As part of the grant to Baldwin, $223,000 will be used over the next three years to provide salaries and a program-support counselor for students of color and a recruiter/mentor for faculty of color.
SPORTS
November 11, 1998 | By Ira Josephs, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Whether she was picking up the pace or picking herself up off the ground, Julia Pudlin was unbeatable this season. Despite falling at the two-mile mark of the Inter-Ac League championship race on Nov. 3 at Westtown School, the Baldwin School freshman won her second straight league title with a course record of 19 minutes, 35 seconds. She also beat Penn Charter's accomplished Catherine Peff, who finished second in 19:39. "She had a real lead at one point," Baldwin coach Suzanne Valutas said.
NEWS
January 31, 2010 | By Sally A. Downey INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Lois C. Nosich Goutman, 86, of Rosemont, who taught drama to generations of students at the Baldwin School, died Jan. 6 at Thomas Jefferson University Hospital after a fall at home. For 42 years, Mrs. Goutman directed a dozen theatrical performances a year in a converted stable at the private girls' academy in Bryn Mawr. After retiring in 1993, she told an Inquirer reporter that she had preferred the small, rustic space. "Kids can get lost in a large auditorium. We didn't have modern technology, so the girls had to make do and be inventive," she said.
NEWS
May 16, 1993 | By Joyce Vottima Hellberg, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
When Jon Weiner makes paper airplanes, it is usually to throw at his younger brother. So when his fourth-grade teacher at the Haverford School told him the class would make airplanes as part of a science project, Jon was thrilled. And he liked the idea of his class of boys getting together with about 45 fourth- grade girls at the Baldwin School. "I've had a good amount of practice making planes," Jon said. "And my brother is a good target. But to do it for science was great.
NEWS
October 24, 2007 | By Martha Woodall INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A Gladwyne couple being sued by a former Baldwin School second-grade teacher who says they cost her her job have responded with a litany of 72 complaints they say were lodged against the teacher by parents and others during her 22-year career at Baldwin. In court documents filed Monday afternoon, Michael and Sheryl Pouls claimed that rather than being the respected teacher she has claimed to be, Patricia Tollin had an abysmal record at the school, based on their review of her personnel file.
NEWS
October 18, 1992 | By Joyce Vottima Hellberg, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Dressed in full regalia, Buffy Redfeather, chief of the Cherokee Nation in the state, spoke to students at the Baldwin School about the history and culture of American Indians. She talked about their contributions and the perspective of the Indians often promoted in movies. Her visit was part of the Bryn Mawr school's first History Day, on Wednesday. "The purpose is to broaden the students' understanding of another culture," said Lois Pressman, head of Baldwin's history department.
NEWS
December 12, 2014 | By Molly Eichel
NBC10'S LU ANN CAHN is leaving the station after 27 years. While NBC brass titled her departure a retirement, Cahn told me she's simply leaving to do something new. Cahn has had a storied career at WCAU. She got personal in the early '90s by sharing her story of fighting breast cancer and netted a national Emmy nomination for her 2005 story "Dirty Little Secret," about an illegal bar run by officials in Delco, among other accomplishments. "Lu Ann is a woman who strikes fear in the hearts of scammers and evil-doers, hope in the hearts of breast-cancer patients and confidence in the hearts of those longing to reboot their lives," Anzio Williams , NBC10's vice president of news, said in a prepared statement.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 19, 2015 | By Samantha Melamed, Inquirer Staff Writer
A child of black nationalists in West Philadelphia, Asali Solomon suffered through her share of bizarre public-library Kwanzaa celebrations. Along with Thanksgiving, she got Umoja Karamu. It made her an outsider at Henry C. Lea School, and it didn't help her social standing when she transferred to the Baldwin School in Bryn Mawr, either. Everyone's childhood has its own particular angst, but Solomon's, at least, provided inspiration for her debut novel, Disgruntled . It was released in February by Farrar Straus Giroux, and she'll read from it on Thursday at 7 p.m. at the University of the Arts' Connelly Auditorium (211 S. Broad St., Philadelphia)
NEWS
April 8, 2015 | By Walter F. Naedele, Inquirer Staff Writer
Karen Bitting met Ellen Marsden Smedley in the 1970s, when both were teaching at the Sheppard School in Lower Kensington. "She ran an unbelievable art program" for children from kindergarten through fourth grade, Bitting said, and did it without a classroom dedicated to art. She had a cart filled with supplies on each of the three floors of Sheppard, Bitting said. "Sometimes, after a class on the third floor," she said, "she would have to tear down to the first floor for her next class.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
April 10, 2015 | By Evan Cross, Inquirer Staff Writer
Erin Golden grounded out on the last play of the game for West Chester Henderson. She also batted in the game-winning run. With the game tied and runners on second and third with no outs in the bottom of the 10th inning, Golden hit a ground ball to second base. Rather than trying to get the lead runner out at home plate, the Coatesville fielder threw to first to force out Golden. That allowed Corinne Ciarrocchi to score, giving Henderson a 6-5 victory in a Chest-Mont National game Wednesday.
NEWS
April 8, 2015 | By Walter F. Naedele, Inquirer Staff Writer
Karen Bitting met Ellen Marsden Smedley in the 1970s, when both were teaching at the Sheppard School in Lower Kensington. "She ran an unbelievable art program" for children from kindergarten through fourth grade, Bitting said, and did it without a classroom dedicated to art. She had a cart filled with supplies on each of the three floors of Sheppard, Bitting said. "Sometimes, after a class on the third floor," she said, "she would have to tear down to the first floor for her next class.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 19, 2015 | By Samantha Melamed, Inquirer Staff Writer
A child of black nationalists in West Philadelphia, Asali Solomon suffered through her share of bizarre public-library Kwanzaa celebrations. Along with Thanksgiving, she got Umoja Karamu. It made her an outsider at Henry C. Lea School, and it didn't help her social standing when she transferred to the Baldwin School in Bryn Mawr, either. Everyone's childhood has its own particular angst, but Solomon's, at least, provided inspiration for her debut novel, Disgruntled . It was released in February by Farrar Straus Giroux, and she'll read from it on Thursday at 7 p.m. at the University of the Arts' Connelly Auditorium (211 S. Broad St., Philadelphia)
NEWS
January 29, 2015 | By Kathy Boccella, Inquirer Staff Writer
For most kids in the region, Tuesday's "snow day" was a perfect storm: A forecast bad enough to cancel classes, yet a dusting so mild that they could spend their unexpected holiday at the mall or the multiplex. But at Bryn Mawr's Baldwin School, it was an ideal day to stay inside the house and read the Chinese philosopher Confucius or sit at the computer coding new apps. In fact, they had no choice. That's because the Main Line girls' academy has replaced "snow days" with "cyber days" - alternative online learning on days when the local roads are deemed impassable but the Information Superhighway is wide open.
NEWS
December 12, 2014 | By Molly Eichel
NBC10'S LU ANN CAHN is leaving the station after 27 years. While NBC brass titled her departure a retirement, Cahn told me she's simply leaving to do something new. Cahn has had a storied career at WCAU. She got personal in the early '90s by sharing her story of fighting breast cancer and netted a national Emmy nomination for her 2005 story "Dirty Little Secret," about an illegal bar run by officials in Delco, among other accomplishments. "Lu Ann is a woman who strikes fear in the hearts of scammers and evil-doers, hope in the hearts of breast-cancer patients and confidence in the hearts of those longing to reboot their lives," Anzio Williams , NBC10's vice president of news, said in a prepared statement.
NEWS
July 28, 2014 | By Michaelle Bond, Inquirer Staff Writer
Matt Greenwood seemed to hold his breath as he stared at his robot rolling through a maze on the floor Tuesday night. The robot crossed the finish line, and the 9-year-old boy's face lit up. "It did it!" he said. "You want to keep programming?" his father, Dan, asked. "Yeah!" Matt said, grabbing the robot and rushing to a laptop that Hannah Tipperman had set up to control it. "They think they're playing with toys, but they're learning some pretty advanced concepts," said Tipperman.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 2, 2014 | By Tirdad Derakhshani, Inquirer Staff Writer
Johnny Depp's 'chick ring' The rumors are true: Johnny Depp , 50, is engaged to marry the remarkably sexy Amber Heard , who is younger and bouncier by 23 years. Depp was sporting a diamond ring Monday when he chatted with reporters in Beijing. They asked if he's engaged. He said, "The fact that I'm wearing a chick's ring on my finger is probably a dead giveaway. Not very subtle. " To say Depp is engaged to marry is an exaggeration. Sure, he actually was wed once, from '83 to '85 to makeup artist Lori Anne Allison . But since then he's been a serial fiancé: many engagements, but no weddings.
NEWS
January 31, 2014 | By Kathy Boccella, Inquirer Staff Writer
About 300 parents and educators came to Baldwin School on Wednesday evening to hear an unusual education reformer - director M. Night Shyamalan - talk about his ideas for closing America's achievement gap. The Philadelphia-area filmmaker has long had an interest in education and recently wrote a book, I Got Schooled , based on his education foundation's research into ways to help poor inner-city students reach the same educational heights as...
NEWS
July 15, 2013 | By Sally M. Powell
Hillary Rodham Clinton challenged the world to change the face of leadership and public service, urging that 50 percent of top positions be held by women by the year 2050. The former secretary of state's "50 by 50" challenge was issued in Bryn Mawr last week, part of her keynote address to the Women in Public Service Project Institute conference. In hearing this, my thoughts turned to our girls who have just completed kindergarten and will graduate from the Baldwin School in 2025.
NEWS
January 31, 2010 | By Sally A. Downey INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Lois C. Nosich Goutman, 86, of Rosemont, who taught drama to generations of students at the Baldwin School, died Jan. 6 at Thomas Jefferson University Hospital after a fall at home. For 42 years, Mrs. Goutman directed a dozen theatrical performances a year in a converted stable at the private girls' academy in Bryn Mawr. After retiring in 1993, she told an Inquirer reporter that she had preferred the small, rustic space. "Kids can get lost in a large auditorium. We didn't have modern technology, so the girls had to make do and be inventive," she said.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|