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NEWS
September 23, 1990 | By Tom Linafelt, Special to The Inquirer
They aren't volunteers, but young, able-bodied workers are helping West Chester's recycling program - for free. People with first-time summary offenses such as underage drinking and disorderly conduct have the option of working their fines off on work details with the borough's Public Works Department. Usually, the offenders bale plastic bottles as part of the recycling program. "The baler is a complex, powerful machine that requires training. We can't just put someone in a room with it and let them go. They will need supervision," said public works director Robert Wilpizeski, who scheduled the first worker.
NEWS
September 1, 1992 | JUANA ANDERSON/ DAILY NEWS
Workers at the American Friends Service Committee in Center City load a 14,000-pound shipment of relief supplies bound for two orphanages in Somalia that the Quaker organization has been operating with Somali staff for the past 10 years. "We hope the 140-bale shipment . . . will be followed by larger ones," said Lucy Murphy, director of AFSC's material aids program.
NEWS
January 20, 2012 | By Kathleen Brady Shea, Inquirer Staff Writer
A mushroom worker who died Monday after being crushed by a 700-pound hay bale at an Avondale processing plant was identified Thursday. New Garden Township police said that officers were dispatched to the Cardile Bros. mushroom plant in the 8800 block of Gap Newport Pike at 12:44 p.m. Monday for "an industrial-related incident" and that medical personnel pronounced Lucio Valderrabano, 40, dead at the scene. Police said no further details would be released until a joint investigation with the U.S. Occupational Safety and Health Administration was completed.
NEWS
January 15, 1995 | By Thomas J. Brady, with reports from Inquirer wire services
TOWN CRIER CRIES FOUL OVER COUNCIL'S COLD SHOULDER Oyez! Oyez! Town crier silenced after affair with mayor's wife! Barry McQueen, town crier for the town of Ludlow, in central England, says he has been cold-shouldered by the town council and not informed of public events since 1990. That was when he began an affair with Pat Middleton, the wife of then-Mayor Alan Middleton. "They don't like me and they would prefer me to shut up and go," McQueen says. "Pat and I now live together, and there are certain elements on the council who have never forgiven me. " Town criers, who shouted the news on the streets of ancient British towns, are now limited to making their cries on ceremonial occasions.
NEWS
December 25, 2012 | By Taryn Luna, Pittsburgh Post-Gazette
PITTSBURGH - Pamela Vivirito knows that a horse with low weight might not have enough fat to endure a winter. And as hay prices have nearly doubled amid seemingly endless requests for help, she's not sure her rescue effort has enough financial padding to make it through the season, either. "It's kind of become a crisis here," she said as she walked through the Equine Angels Rescue barn she rents in Cabot near Pittsburgh. "We just took in three more horses last week because there are so many surrenders.
NEWS
March 2, 1989 | By Ellen O'Brien, Inquirer Staff Writer
The second-floor nightclub and party center in the Showplace, on the Admiral Wilson Boulevard in Camden, has a maximum capacity of 1,700 people - or up to 50 tons of clothes. Which is a lot of clothes. Even if half that amount shows up. It's a lot of clothes, for a lot of people in Camden County. For free. "I looked at the clothing . . . and I thought, 'Oh, my God!' " said Camden County Freeholder Joseph Carroll, who set up the project. He expressed some relief yesterday when he heard that Camden might share responsibility for the massive dispersal with the Burlington County Boy Scouts.
NEWS
August 29, 2000 | By Dave Barry
Welcome to "Ask Mister Language Person," written by the foremost leading world authority on the proper grammatorical usagality of English, both orally and in the form of words. In this award-winning column, which appears nocturnally, we answer the grammar and vocabulary questions that are on the minds of many Americans just before they pass out. Today, as is our wont, we begin with our first question: Q. You have a wont? A. Yes, but we comb our hair such that you cannot see it. Q. With regards to the old spiritual song, "Gwine Jump Down, Turn Around, Pick a Bale of Cotton," why is the singer gwine jump down and turn around first?
NEWS
March 12, 1986 | BY DAVE BARRY
Once again it is time for my annual helpful tax-advice column. This year's Timely Tax Tip Topic is: "What To Do If You Are Called In For An Audit, Aside From Drugs. " But before we get to that, let me just state how very pleased I am to report that the Internal Revenue Service has straightened out the little problem it was having wherein some employees, trying desperately to meet their Production Quotas, were throwing away incoming tax returns without opening them. Really.
NEWS
August 2, 1989 | By Relli Katz, Special to The Inquirer
Some people have to cope with a heat wave on top of an already hot job. A heat wave, according to officials at the National Weather Service, is several successive days of 90-degree-or-more temperatures, and there have been at least five of those days since July 23. It's nothing like the 49 successive 90-degree days we had last summer, but still, it's plenty hot. Some people, however, are just used to sweating it out. Bill Mukalian Jr.,...
NEWS
July 16, 1989 | By John Corcoran, Special to The Inquirer
Just about this time last year, Richard Schlosberg was fighting a persistent, raspy cough from all the dust that he breathed as he worked his sun-parched grain fields. This year, the Newtown Square resident says he's physically fit, but is contending with a different weather-related problem - too much water on the 1,100 acres of farmland he rents in Delaware and Chester Counties. "It's far from a normal year. . . . We definitely went from one extreme to the other," said Schlosberg, who runs what county agricultural officials describe as the largest of at least 30 major farms in Delaware County.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
December 23, 2013 | By Steven Rea, Inquirer Movie Critic
'He is a brilliant con artist, OK?" Christian Bale says of Irving Rosenfeld, the character he plays in American Hustle . "But, really, who is he conning with that hair?"
NEWS
August 2, 2013 | By Virginia A. Smith, Inquirer Staff Writer
A roundup of garden books worth your attention. As Debra Lee Baldwin tells it, she has "a passion for plants that drink responsibly. " She refers, of course, to succulents, those thick, fleshy plants that store water in their stems and leaves. Baldwin's new book - Succulents Simplified: Growing, Designing, and Crafting With 100 Easy-Care Varieties (Timber Press, $24.95) - is her third on this fascinating plant group, which includes cacti, echeverias, sempervivums, aeoniums, and plenty more.
NEWS
December 25, 2012 | By Taryn Luna, Pittsburgh Post-Gazette
PITTSBURGH - Pamela Vivirito knows that a horse with low weight might not have enough fat to endure a winter. And as hay prices have nearly doubled amid seemingly endless requests for help, she's not sure her rescue effort has enough financial padding to make it through the season, either. "It's kind of become a crisis here," she said as she walked through the Equine Angels Rescue barn she rents in Cabot near Pittsburgh. "We just took in three more horses last week because there are so many surrenders.
NEWS
August 4, 2012 | By Virginia A. Smith, Inquirer Staff Writer
About 15 years ago, she can't remember where or how, Linda Antonacio-Hoade heard the term "straw bale gardening" and thought the idea fascinating. So she bought a bale, dug a pocket in the middle, and planted flowers in it. "Unfortunately, they just kinda sat there, living but not thriving," she recalls. Her latest attempt at this unusual growing system is not only thriving, but public proof that "you don't need 40 acres to grow vegetables" - right in the middle of the parking lot at the Penn State Cooperative Extension in Collegeville, where Antonacio-Hoade works as educational outreach coordinator.
NEWS
April 14, 2012 | By Gene Johnson, Associated Press
SEATTLE - The U.S. soldier charged in the shooting deaths of 17 Afghan villagers last month will not participate in an Army review aimed at determining his mental state, his attorney said Friday. Staff Sgt. Robert Bales was expected to face what's called a "sanity board" examination by Army doctors seeking to establish whether he's competent to stand trial and what his mental state was at the time of the March 11 pre-dawn massacre in two southern Afghanistan villages. But his civilian lawyer, John Henry Browne, said Friday he instructed Bales to invoke his Fifth Amendment right to remain silent because the Army will not allow Bales to have an attorney at the sanity board review and will not allow the examination to be recorded.
NEWS
April 1, 2012 | By Chris Grygiel and Mike Baker, Associated Press
SEATTLE - The attorney for the U.S. soldier accused of killing 17 Afghan civilians said Friday that the U.S. government was "hiding evidence" from the defense team. John Henry Browne said members of the defense team in Afghanistan were told they would have access to witnesses at a hospital, but later discovered the people had been released. He also said the U.S. government has not turned over files to the lawyers defending Army Staff Sgt. Robert Bales. The defense team said in a statement the prosecution was withholding information "while potential witnesses scatter.
NEWS
March 31, 2012 | By Chris Grygiel and Mike Baker, Associated Press
SEATTLE - The attorney for the U.S. soldier accused of killing 17 Afghan civilians said Friday that the U.S. government was "hiding evidence" from the defense team. John Henry Browne said members of the defense team in Afghanistan were told they would have access to witnesses at a hospital, but later discovered the people had been released. He also said the U.S. government has not turned over files to the lawyers defending Army Staff Sgt. Robert Bales. The defense team said in a statement the prosecution was withholding information "while potential witnesses scatter.
NEWS
March 24, 2012 | By Deb Riechmann, Associated Press
KABUL, Afghanistan - U.S. Army Staff Sgt. Robert Bales was charged Friday with 17 counts of premeditated murder, a capital offense that could lead to the death penalty in the massacre of Afghan civilians, the U.S. military said. Bales, 38, is accused of walking off a U.S. military base with his 9mm pistol and an M-4 rifle fitted with a grenade launcher before dawn on March 11, killing nine Afghan children and eight adults, and burning some of the bodies. It was the worst allegation of civilian killings by an American, and it has severely strained U.S.-Afghan ties at a critical time in the decade-old war. It's unclear what prompted the killings, but the case has drawn new attention to the debate over mental-health care for the troops, who have had record suicide rates and high incidences of post-traumatic stress and brain injuries during repeated tours in Iraq and Afghanistan.
NEWS
March 19, 2012 | By Gene Johnson, Associated Press
SEATTLE - With formal charges looming against his client within days, the lawyer for an Army sergeant suspected in the horrific nighttime slaughter of 16 Afghan villagers was flying Sunday to Kansas and preparing for his first face-to-face meeting with the 10-year veteran. John Henry Browne of Seattle said he planned to meet Monday with Army Staff Sgt. Robert Bales, who is being held in an isolated cell at Fort Leavenworth's military prison. Bales, 38, has not been charged in the March 11 shootings, which have endangered relations between the United States and Afghanistan and threaten to upend U.S. policy over the decade-old war. Formal charges are expected to be filed within a week, and if the case goes to court, the trial will be in the United States, said a legal expert with the U.S. military familiar with the probe.
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