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SPORTS
March 21, 2010
Jon Runyan officially announced he's running for Congress. I did the same about four years ago. It wasn't easy. Lots of hand-shaking and baby kissing. (Note to Runyan: Ask permission before doing the latter; gets awkward when you just lean in without warning the mother.) Would Runyan make a good politician, and how do you think he'll do in the race? Well, let's see. He should be willing to "tackle" the difficult issues and "protect" his constituents from bills that shouldn't "pass.
SPORTS
May 29, 1991 | by Ray Didinger, Daily News Sports Writer
Mike Schmidt was on the cover of the March issue of Business Philadelphia magazine, his two hands wrapped around a hoagie instead of a baseball bat. In an accompanying article, Schmidt discussed his life after baseball with Maury Z. Levy, the magazine's editor, and noted that he hasn't enjoyed the marketing success he feels he deserves. Why? Not enough glitz, according to Schmidt. "Occasionally, I get a little jealous that I'm not as easily marketable as an Andre Agassi because he's not married, he wears that off-the-wall (bleep)
NEWS
June 27, 2011
THE COUNTRY is in economic quicksand, and no solution is in sight. Infusions of literally trillions of dollars, the nonstop printing of cheap money and the president's refusal to rid himself of advisers whose advice has proven ineffective have put the U.S. economy in an intractable position. Only two industries are thriving - pro sports and gambling venues. How long can they dodge the bullet? The Great Depression was canceled by World War II. It's a different ballgame today.
SPORTS
December 16, 2009 | By GREG RACHAC, Billings (Montana) Gazette
Chase Reynolds broke his own school record - and matched another - during Montana's 24-17 victory over Appalachian State on a cold and snowy Saturday at Washington-Grizzly Stadium. But those marks don't hold much water for the junior running back, who has his mind on other things right now. "They're just records," Reynolds said after the win. "They don't mean anything to me. There's a game we've been shooting for, and that's this Friday. That's all I'm concerned about. " Against the Mountaineers, Reynolds carried 23 times for 193 yards and two touchdowns to lead his team into the FCS title game for the second straight season.
SPORTS
May 17, 1986 | By DICK WEISS, Daily News Sports Writer
Sidney Moncrief originally had planned to play every other game in the Eastern Conference final series between the Milwaukee Bucks and Boston Celtics. But the Bucks' star guard, who has been bothered by a painfully torn heel, is considering changing that timetable this afternoon in Game 3 at Milwaukee Arena. "Our strategy, because we're down 0-2, I don't know if it's going to have to be altered or not," Moncrief said. "What we're looking at is if I can run and be effective.
SPORTS
November 21, 1994 | by Kevin Mulligan, Daily News Sports Writer
Randall Cunningham is most definitely in a three-week funk that easily could have produced a three-game losing streak were it not for Lady Luck three Sundays ago against the Arizona Cardinals. The Eagles' quarterback was out of it for much of yesterday's 12-6 loss to Arizona, completing 17 of 44 passes (with four drops by receivers) for 151 yards (110 net) with another costly interception. The offense has scored just 30 points the last three weeks and Cunningham is a shadow of the quarterback who performed so well against Chicago and San Francisco in the early going.
SPORTS
October 3, 1989 | By Dick Jerardi, Daily News Sports Writer
There are few more predictable events than the day-before-the-series media gathering. Canned questions. Trite answers. Hear no evil, speak no evil - especially about your opponent. The Toronto Blue Jays were predictably boring on the eve of tonight's first game of the best-of-seven American League Championship Series (Channel 3, 8 o'clock), and spent the time dealing out the usual platitudes. The Oakland A's, however, were sort of like, well, the old Oakland Raiders. "It's been a team effort," Toronto manager Cito Gaston said when asked to describe how the Blue Jays came from behind to catch and pass the Baltimore Orioles in the stretch to win the Eastern Division.
SPORTS
April 9, 1999 | by Mike Kern, Daily News Sports Writer
During Tuesday's "mandatory" trip to the interview room, Tiger Woods said the part of his game he's most pleased with is the virtual elimination of those dreaded "others" from his scorecards. Yesterday at Augusta National, the 1997 Masters champ hacked his way to a triple-bogey snowman on the par-5 eighth hole. So much for avoiding any whopper numbers. That dropped him to 2-over. Birdies at 12, 13 and 14 got him back into red figures. A bogey on the next-to-last hole left him at even-par 72, three behind the first-round leaders.
SPORTS
July 28, 1997 | by Paul Hagen, Daily News Sports Writer
The story of some games can be revealed in a snapshot moment. For example, this scene from the bottom of the third inning at Dodger Stadium: The baseball has just jumped off the bat of Tripp Cromer. Phillies lefthander Matt Beech, quickly realizing that he has surrendered another home run, grabs his head with both arms. It is a pose that suggests frustration, dismay, a trace of anger. Click. As the first anniversary of Beech's first and only big-league victory looms ever closer, those were also pretty much the emotions that normally upbeat manager Terry Francona seemed to convey yesterday afternoon when discussing Beech's contribution to the Phillies' 7-1 loss to the Dodgers.
SPORTS
March 14, 1991 | by Stan Hochman, Daily News Sports Columnist
There's Lenny Dykstra, unlucky poker player, witness for the prosecution, lips zipped, brow furrowed. And then there's Lenny Dykstra, centerfielder, quintessential leadoff man, .750 hitter, hotter than a royal flush, you should excuse the expression. Back in red-striped flannels, with a shirt that fits his bulked-up chest, he rapped out three more hits yesterday as the Phillies thumped Toronto, 13-8. If the organist doesn't play "forget your troubles and just be happy" every time Dykstra comes to bat, he should be tossed out of the ballpark organist union.
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SPORTS
March 5, 2014 | BY FRANK SERAVALLI, Daily News Staff Writer seravaf@phillynews.com
First in a series BOSTON - Baseball's first in-ballpark advance to change the way the game was consumed by fans was made here 80 years ago, when Fenway Park installed lights to indicate balls and strikes in the Green Monster scoreboard in 1934. The lights, green to depict balls and red to display strikes, were considered high technology at the time. Yankee Stadium later added the game's first electronic scoreboard in 1950. The Astrodome dazzled fans with the first video scoreboard in 1965.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 21, 2013 | By Molly Eichel
  C   HRIS MAY won't be so lonely at the anchor desk come next month. Jessica Dean will join the CBS3/CW57 anchor, replacing the much-beloved Susan Barnett , who left in April. Dean will appear on the 5, 6 and 11 p.m. newscasts on CBS3 and on CW57's Philly's 10 p.m. newscast. Dean comes to Philly from the NBC affiliate in Little Rock, Ark., where she has been the evening news anchor since 2011. Although CBS3 didn't give Dean an official start date, her last newscast in Arkansas will be Sept.
NEWS
June 27, 2011
THE COUNTRY is in economic quicksand, and no solution is in sight. Infusions of literally trillions of dollars, the nonstop printing of cheap money and the president's refusal to rid himself of advisers whose advice has proven ineffective have put the U.S. economy in an intractable position. Only two industries are thriving - pro sports and gambling venues. How long can they dodge the bullet? The Great Depression was canceled by World War II. It's a different ballgame today.
SPORTS
June 24, 2011 | by Paul Hagen, hagenp@phillynews.com
BASEBALL IS A game of exquisite checks and balances. Almost nothing happens that doesn't impact something else. Hit or error? What's good for a hitter's batting average could be damaging to a pitcher's earned run average. Or vice versa. The implications of the Phillies' offensive inconsistencies further illustrates the point. The uncertainty about how many runs the lineup will produce on a given night - Three? Two? One? None? - burrows deeply into almost every aspect of the game.
SPORTS
November 9, 2010 | By PHIL JASNER, jasnerp@phillynews.com
THE ANTICIPATION in Istanbul has been immense. Allen Iverson is coming. The news has been swirling for weeks. It does not seem to matter that Iverson is 35, that his best days are behind him, that he struggled last season in three games with the Memphis Grizzlies and 25 with the 76ers. All that matters is, Allen Iverson is coming. In true Iverson fashion, he was supposed to be there Saturday, to be greeted by throngs of people, to sign autographs, to be introduced to his new teammates with Besiktas.
SPORTS
March 21, 2010
Jon Runyan officially announced he's running for Congress. I did the same about four years ago. It wasn't easy. Lots of hand-shaking and baby kissing. (Note to Runyan: Ask permission before doing the latter; gets awkward when you just lean in without warning the mother.) Would Runyan make a good politician, and how do you think he'll do in the race? Well, let's see. He should be willing to "tackle" the difficult issues and "protect" his constituents from bills that shouldn't "pass.
NEWS
December 21, 2009
FOR SOME TIME, I've been searching for an analogy that accurately captures the Republican Party's behavior since being voted out of power last November, and I have concluded that the Republicans are like the kid on the Little League team who gets benched for a new player. Out of anger and jealousy, the kid relentlessly criticizes the new player in the desperate hope that he will persuade the coach to put him back in the game. But what the kid doesn't understand is that he will not get back into the game until he convinces the coach that he puts the team before his own selfish interests.
SPORTS
December 16, 2009 | By GREG RACHAC, Billings (Montana) Gazette
Chase Reynolds broke his own school record - and matched another - during Montana's 24-17 victory over Appalachian State on a cold and snowy Saturday at Washington-Grizzly Stadium. But those marks don't hold much water for the junior running back, who has his mind on other things right now. "They're just records," Reynolds said after the win. "They don't mean anything to me. There's a game we've been shooting for, and that's this Friday. That's all I'm concerned about. " Against the Mountaineers, Reynolds carried 23 times for 193 yards and two touchdowns to lead his team into the FCS title game for the second straight season.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 9, 2009 | By Dianna Marder INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Archaeology can fascinate kids long before they understand the term itself, and the subject continues to intrigue adults long after they graduate with degrees in seemingly unrelated subjects. That's because archaeology is essentially the study of our culture and, as humans, we tend to find ourselves (and by extension, our ancestors) fascinating. What's more, archaeology encompasses many areas - ancient art and architecture, food and cooking, religion, science, the Earth itself - and it brings the past to life.
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