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Ballot Box

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NEWS
December 18, 1987 | By Marc Kaufman and Lewis M. Simons, Inquirer South Korea Bureau (Inquirer wire services contributed to this article.)
Thousands of police stormed a polling place in Seoul early today and evicted 2,000 people to recover a disputed ballot box that opposition groups said was stuffed with fraudulent votes during Wednesday's presidential election. The protesters had prevented election workers from opening the disputed ballot box at a voting place in a district government office building in the Kuro section of Seoul. About 4,000 police firing tear gas and backed by a dozen fire engines shooting water at the protesters stormed the building at 6 a.m., witnesses said.
SPORTS
June 17, 1992 | by Paul Hagen, Daily News Sports Writer
Since the last time the All-Star ballots were counted a week ago, Phillies catcher Darren Daulton completed a streak during which he hit seven home runs in seven starts and took over the National League lead in RBI. San Diego's Benito Santiago remained on the disabled list. During that same time, Santiago tallied more than 238,000 additional votes to hold his lead in the fan election. Daulton got less than 26,000 additional votes and slipped from fourth place to sixth among NL catchers.
NEWS
December 17, 1987 | By Marc Kaufman and Lewis M. Simons, Inquirer South Korea Bureau
Proud and defiant, Park Young Hwan stood guard late last night over the ballot box he had captured. He was surrounded and protected by thousands of other chanting, fist- shaking residents of the tough, working-class district of Kuro - irate people whose only consolation on this frigid night of defeat for South Korea's opposition was their firm belief that they had caught the ruling party in the act of stealing the election. The knee-high, yard-long, green ballot box was still next to the pickup truck in which Park had found it - hidden beneath several bundled packages of bread and apples and presumably filled with rigged ballots - at noon yesterday.
SPORTS
August 30, 1995 | by Phil Jasner, Daily News Sports Writer
Traveling is suddenly the most critical move an NBA player can make. An estimated 423 players are eligible to travel to any of 47 regional National Labor Relations Board offices to make a stand on decertifying their union. They can make the trip today, with the polls open from 10:30 a.m. until noon and again from 3:30 to 5 p.m., or they can do it Sept. 7 at the same times. The Philadelphia office is at 6th and Chestnut streets. What's at stake is whether the 1995-96 season is delayed or, in a worst- case scenario, eliminated.
NEWS
January 25, 1993 | By GEORGE F. WILL
In the soothing ointment of President Clinton's words on Wednesday, one element was especially welcome to people who worry about the political giddiness encouraged, inevitably, by the civic liturgy of an inauguration. The element was the emphasis placed by Clinton, who as candidate stressed "change" propelled by government, on the autonomy of change: "Profound and powerful forces are shaking and remaking our world. " The forces to which he was referring - forces of communication, commerce, science, intellectual and religious conviction - are always doing that.
NEWS
December 19, 1987 | By Marc Kaufman, Inquirer Staff Writer
It was just before dawn yesterday when the first pop could be heard and tear gas started to fill the cold morning air. The battle of Kuro had begun. When it was over several hours later, 1,005 anti-government protesters were under arrest and scores were injured, some of them severely beaten. There also were persistent reports that several protesters either jumped from or were pushed from atop a five-story government office building that had been used as a polling place.
NEWS
November 8, 2005
THE REACTION of the Daily News and the left in general to Samuel A. Alito Jr. tells me that the president picked the right man for the job. Nominees such as Alito are in the public spotlight for the first time, so I have little firsthand knowledge of their conservative credentials. That's why I watch the reaction of the left to the nominee. Their reaction is fear. The left can't get what they want through the ballot box, so they depend on the courts to back their agenda. This nominee threatens their control of the Supreme Court.
NEWS
December 11, 2003
For the past several weeks, Taiwan and China have been exchanging rhetorical broadsides about how the island's political future might be decided. . . . Tuesday, President Bush essentially placed the United States on the side of the dictators who promise war, rather than the democrats whose threat is a ballot box. His gift to visiting Chinese Premier Wen Jiabao was to condemn "the comments and actions made by the leader of Taiwan" while ignoring the sanguinary rhetoric of the man standing next to him. Mr. Bush had his reasons for doing so - above all to avoid one more foreign policy crisis during an election year.
NEWS
November 27, 2009
LEAVE IT TO the Christian right to again use abortion to throw a monkey wrench at health care. Abortion has been legal for decades and represents separation from church in favor of state. I, as a taxpayer, pay for many government policies with which I disagree: war, capital punishment and denial of homosexual rights being some of them. But I want to see improvements for those bankrupted by health care. I separate my pet peeves from issues that benefit the majority. I simply ask the religious right to stop using their hot-button issues to deny the majority.
NEWS
October 9, 1995 | by Mark McDonald, Daily News Staff Writer
Sheriff John Green is investigating a complaint that one of his deputies grabbed a ballot box and tried to flee as votes were being counted in a union election for school crossing guards last week. The reason may have been simple enough - a daughter's concern for her mom. Deputy Sheriff Deanna Reeder was concerned that her mother, Wilhemenia Reeder, president of AFSCME Local 1956, was about to lose her job. At least that's what Reeder's union opponents are contending in a complaint filed with the sheriff's office.
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NEWS
September 7, 2015 | By Andrew Seidman, Inquirer Trenton Bureau
New Jersey Democrats, anticipating a veto from Gov. Christie, are considering asking voters to amend the constitution to bring sweeping changes to the state's voting laws. In doing so, they're betting on a reliable but controversial strategy to advance policy initiatives that would otherwise stall under the Republican governor and presidential candidate. Democrats, who control both chambers in Trenton, have turned to the ballot box to skirt Christie on such measures as raising the minimum wage and dedicating funding for open space.
NEWS
July 10, 2015 | BY WILL BUNCH, Daily News Staff Writer bunchw@phillynews.com, 215-854-2957
WHAT A DIFFERENCE 11 years makes. The last time the NAACP held its national convention in Philadelphia, in 2004, then-President George W. Bush turned down an invitation to speak - a spokesman complained of "rather hostile political comments" - and one of the highlights was a speech by Bill Cosby, hailed as "a philanthropist and a role model. " As the leading civil-rights organization returns tomorrow to the Pennsylvania Convention Center to launch its five-day 106th annual convention, the NAACP is making plans to welcome President Obama - as the nation's first black president sees rising approval numbers near the end of his second term - but it's highly doubtful that the scandal-scarred Cosby name will even come up. There will be plenty of other things to talk about.
NEWS
May 30, 2015 | By Chris Brennan, Inquirer Staff Writer
One Philadelphia voter wanted Mickey Mouse on City Council, while another supported the rodent's longtime sweetheart, Minnie, for the Pennsylvania Supreme Court. Daffy Duck also got a nod for Council, along with Bozo the Clown. And Philly Jesus won votes for Council and Municipal Court judge. Philadelphia voters cast ballots for 41 electoral contests in last week's primary election. And 1,296 of them, unimpressed with their options, opted to write in candidates not on the ballot.
NEWS
December 11, 2014 | By Michaelle Bond, Inquirer Staff Writer
Michelle Kichline, a former Tredyffrin Township supervisor, will be Chester County's newest commissioner. Chester County judges selected Kichline on Tuesday to replace Ryan Costello, who is scheduled to be sworn in as Sixth District congressman on Jan. 6. Costello, the board chairman, will formally resign Monday. Kichline and the judges will determine when she will join the board. She will finish Costello's term, which expires in early 2016. Since the outgoing commissioner is a Republican, replacement candidates also had to be Republicans, according to Pennsylvania law. After Kichline joins the board, she and Commissioners Terence Farrell and Kathi Cozzone will vote to determine the chairman.
NEWS
September 19, 2014 | BY CHRIS BRENNAN, Daily News Staff Writer brennac@phillynews.com, 215-854-5973
SYMBOLISM AND union anger trumped substance and legislative caution yesterday as City Council overwhelmingly approved a ballot referendum asking voters if the School Reform Commission should be abolished. The question now: Will Mayor Nutter sign that measure into law, allowing the nonbinding referendum to appear on the Nov. 4 general-election ballot? Councilwoman Jannie Blackwell, the legislation's sponsor, apologized to a raucous crowd of union members and education activists who were openly disappointed that she did not bring the subject up for a vote last week.
NEWS
July 14, 2013 | ASSOCIATED PRESS
DORSET, Minn. - Supporters of the mayor in the tiny tourist town of Dorset can stuff the ballot box all they want as he seeks re-election. The mayor - a short guy - is known for his fondness of ice cream and fishing. And he's got the county's top law-enforcement official in his pocket. Say hello to Mayor Robert "Bobby" Tufts. He's 4 years old and not even in school yet. Bobby was only 3 when he won election last year as mayor of Dorset (population 22 to 28, depending on whether the minister and his family are in town)
NEWS
October 7, 2012 | By Michael Smerconish
Now that it's been resolved that photo IDs won't be required in the current election, can we move on to other measures that enhance, not suppress, turnout? Like allowing early voting? Or voting by mobile phone? According to the Associated Press, Pennsylvania is the largest of 10 states that don't allow early voting, online registration, or Election Day registration. Here, the voter-registration cutoff is this Tuesday, a month before Election Day. And state law allows for early voting only if residents apply for an absentee ballot through their county's Board of Elections, a process that requires them to document why they'll be unable to make it to a polling place on Election Day. Potential early voters must cite factors such as military service, professional duties, vacations, religious holidays, and illness or physical disability.
NEWS
July 28, 2012 | By David O'Reilly, Inquirer Staff Writer
Saying America is so mired in "moral depravity" that only a mass appeal to the Almighty can save it, Christian evangelical leaders from across the country are planning a giant prayer rally for Sept. 29 in Philadelphia. The "America for Jesus" daylong gathering on Independence Mall is expected to draw at least 30,000 people who "want to turn the nation around," said Bishop Anne Giminez, chairwoman of the event and pastor of Rock Pentecostal Church in Virginia Beach, Va. "We see the symptoms of decline all around us," she said Wednesday, citing murder and abortion rates and the decline of marriage.
NEWS
July 26, 2012 | By Bruce Ackerman and Jennifer Nou
In 1964, the American people enacted the 24th Amendment to prevent the exclusion of the poor from the ballot box. In his recent speech at the NAACP convention, U.S. Attorney General Eric H. Holder Jr. wasn't indulging in election-year rhetoric when he condemned Texas' 2011 voter-identification law as a poll tax that could exclude the poor. He was speaking the hard legal truth. The Justice Department would be right to challenge this new law as an unconstitutional poll tax. The department has temporarily blocked the Texas law under special provisions of the Voting Rights Act that apply to jurisdictions, mostly in the South, with a history of discriminating against minority groups.
NEWS
June 25, 2012 | By Robert W. Patterson
When he cast his lot last month with elites who want to reinvent marriage, President Obama thought he was riding the crest of history. Cheered on by the media and $15 million in campaign cash from Hollywood — both of whom consider his "coming out" on par with the Emancipation Proclamation — the president presumes "the people" are behind him. Yet in fact, the man Newsweek declared our "first gay president" has confirmed how strikingly his...
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