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Ballot Measures

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NEWS
November 9, 2011
CITY VOTERS yesterday overwhelmingly approved two ballot measures that would create a rainy-day fund and allow the city to borrow $111.3 million for capital projects. The rainy-day fund is similar to a savings account and will help the city during unexpected financial emergencies. The capital borrowing would go toward transit, streets and sanitation, municipal buildings, parks and recreation, museums and economic and community development. With 96 percent of the vote counted, 72 percent of voters supported the rainy-day fund, 65 percent approved the borrowing.
NEWS
November 1, 1998 | By Maria Recio, INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
The voters will speak Tuesday, not just on the right man or woman for office, but also on a range of subjects, including such unsettled "hot button" issues as legalization of marijuana, affirmative action and same-sex marriage. In a form of direct democracy, more than 200 ballot measures in 40 states could set policy on matters of national and local concern. Some issues are intensely local, such as wolf snaring in Alaska or cockfighting in Missouri; others, such as abortion and assisted suicide, resonate nationally.
NEWS
November 6, 2003 | By Reid Kanaley INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Coatesville voters on Tuesday seemed to issue a collective cease-and-desist order against the city's plan to build a municipal golf course partly on farmland in a neighboring township. But city officials, and others both for and against the ballot measures that city voters narrowly approved, spent yesterday wondering what the full impact of those measures will be, and what comes next. "I would like to think that it's over, but I'm sure they'll have something up their sleeve," said Dick Saha, the Valley Township resident whose farmland the city has sought to condemn since 1999.
NEWS
November 5, 2003 | By Reid Kanaley INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Coatesville voters yesterday approved three ballot measures aimed at killing the city's plan to put a golf course on farmland outside the municipal limits. "I'm ecstatic," said Jeff Voelcker, son-in-law to Dick Saha, whose Valley Township horse farm the city has sought to take for a recreation complex, which includes the golf course. "Let us go on with our lives," added Voelcker, who also lives on the farm land. "I'm disappointed that the residents of the city didn't realize the importance" of defeating the measures, City Council member David DeSimone said.
NEWS
October 29, 2003 | By Reid Kanaley INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Coatesville voters will be asked on Tuesday to decide on three ballot measures aimed at killing the city's controversial plan to put a golf course on farmland seized outside the city limits. City officials, and a citizens' group hastily organized to defeat the proposals, say the measures are shortsighted and could have effects far beyond determining whether Valley Township farmer Dick Saha's 48-acre horse farm remains intact. "It's the 11th hour, and it's a shame it's come down to this," said Eric Collins, a city resident and member of the citizens' group called the Committee of '79. Supporters of the ballot measures - which would require the city to submit a wide range of activities for general voter approval - say city officials need to be reined in. "I'd like to see them pass, and that would give control back to the citizens and the voters, which is where it should be," Saha said yesterday.
NEWS
November 26, 1986 | BY JILL PRESS
Governor-elect Bob Casey's pro-abortion stance nearly cost him the election. Squeaking past his pro-choice opponent, Lt. Gov. Bill Scranton, by 75,000 votes, Casey represents the minuscule minority of anti-choice politicos who actually won the 1986 elections. The widespread failure pf the anti-choice community comes as no surprise. Earlier this year, U.S. Sen. Mark Hatfield, R-Ore., a self-proclaimed "anti- abortionist," summarized the sorry state of his group's efforts: "The pro-life movement ought to seriously cosnider adopting a new strategy," he said.
NEWS
June 30, 2004 | By Reid Kanaley INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Coatesville officials have agreed to borrow $8.5 million to jump-start the downtown revitalization and pay old bills on a controversial plan for a city-owned golf course. The city's redevelopment authority voted yesterday to take a 5-year, adjustable-rate, $7 million line of credit from First Financial Bank. The money will be used to buy and clean up downtown property, including old steel mill ground, for resale to developers who have proposed hundreds of millions of dollars in housing, office and retail construction.
NEWS
November 7, 1990 | By Paul Nussbaum, Inquirer Staff Writer
Pennsylvania voters yesterday overwhelmingly approved two ballot measures to provide more money for overcrowded county jails and for local fire and ambulance equipment. The ballot measures authorize the state to borrow $200 million for the repair, expansion and construction of county prisons and $25 million for loans to volunteer fire, rescue and ambulance companies. Both propositions passed by wide margins. With 94 percent of the votes counted, the jail measure was winning by a 3-2 ratio, and the fire-equipment measure by more than 3-1. The jail measure will provide money for state government to make grants to counties that are building new jails or repairing old ones.
NEWS
March 9, 2012
RICHMOND, VA. - Religious broadcaster Pat Robertson says marijuana should be legalized and treated like alcohol because the government's war on drugs has failed. The outspoken evangelical Christian and host of "The 700 Club," shown on the Virginia Beach-based Christian Broadcasting Network he founded, said the war on drugs is costing taxpayers billions of dollars. He said people should not be imprisoned for marijuana possession. Robertson, 81, first became a self-proclaimed "hero of the hippie culture" in 2010, when he called for ending mandatory prison sentences for marijuana-possession convictions.
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NEWS
November 7, 2012 | By Miriam Hill, Inquirer Staff Writer
By comfortable margins, Philadelphia voters approved four ballot measures Tuesday, including one that gives an independent body the power to set water and sewer rates. With more than 95 percent of precincts counted, all four proposals were headed for passage. City Council President Darrell L. Clarke pushed for a new water authority after the Water Department in February proposed raising rates 28.5 percent over three years, though that figure has not been finalized. Under the current system, there is a hearing process with input from a hearing officer and a public advocate appointed by Clarke, Mayor Nutter, and City Controller Alan Butkovitz.
NEWS
October 26, 2012 | By Julie Pace and Steve Peoples, Associated Press
CINCINNATI - President Obama, seeking to shore up support among women, intensified his pressure Thursday on Mitt Romney to break any ties with a Republican Senate candidate who said that if a woman becomes pregnant from rape, it is "something God intended. " Romney ignored the emotional social issue, holding to an optimistic campaign tone as he fought for victory in crucial Ohio. Obama, wrapping up a 40-hour battleground state blitz, also headed to his hometown of Chicago and cast his ballot 12 days before Election Day. The stopover was more than a photo opportunity - it was a high-profile attempt to boost turnout in early voting, a centerpiece of his strategy.
SPORTS
October 3, 2012 | Daily News Wire Reports
TEN NORTH DAKOTA State football players pleaded guilty Tuesday to misdemeanor election fraud and were sentenced to community service for faking signatures on ballot measure petitions that they were hired to collect. Among the players on the nation's top-ranked Football Championship Subdivision team who pleaded guilty were starters Samuel Ojuri, Joshua Colville, Marcus Williams and Brendin Pierre. Each of the players was ordered to serve 360 days of unsupervised probation, complete 50 hours of community service and pay $325 in fees.
NEWS
March 9, 2012
RICHMOND, VA. - Religious broadcaster Pat Robertson says marijuana should be legalized and treated like alcohol because the government's war on drugs has failed. The outspoken evangelical Christian and host of "The 700 Club," shown on the Virginia Beach-based Christian Broadcasting Network he founded, said the war on drugs is costing taxpayers billions of dollars. He said people should not be imprisoned for marijuana possession. Robertson, 81, first became a self-proclaimed "hero of the hippie culture" in 2010, when he called for ending mandatory prison sentences for marijuana-possession convictions.
NEWS
March 9, 2012 | By Michael Felberbaum, Associated Press
RICHMOND, Va. - Religious broadcaster Pat Robertson says marijuana should be legalized and treated like alcohol because the government's war on drugs has failed. The outspoken evangelical Christian and host of The 700 Club on the Virginia Beach-based Christian Broadcasting Network he founded said the war on drugs was costing taxpayers billions of dollars. He said people should not be sent to prison for marijuana possession. Robertson, 81, first became a self-proclaimed "hero of the hippie culture" in 2010 when he called for ending mandatory prison sentences for marijuana-possession convictions.
NEWS
October 28, 2010
Four ballot questions are being put before Philadelphia voters Tuesday - most notably, a City Charter change that will expand the reach of a five-year-old ordinance that assures better pay and benefits at agencies and firms that do business with City Hall. Each question merits a "yes" vote. Two questions would deal with the nuts and bolts of city government: A nearly $107 million bond issue would provide for street paving, transit projects, building maintenance, and the like. These are necessary investments in the city's infrastructure.
NEWS
November 5, 2004 | By Reid Kanaley INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Voters in two more Chester County townships - East Nottingham and Highland - agreed Tuesday to let taxes be raised to protect open space. The townships bring to 20 the number of Chester County municipalities that have moved in recent years to harbor undeveloped tracts in the face of encroaching subdivisions. Ballot measures have been approved that allow local officials to increase the 1 percent earned-income tax by as much as 50 percent - to a maximum 1.5 percent of wages. Proceeds from the additional tax can be used to preserve open space through a variety of methods, including property acquisition, or the purchase of development rights from landowners.
NEWS
June 30, 2004 | By Reid Kanaley INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Coatesville officials have agreed to borrow $8.5 million to jump-start the downtown revitalization and pay old bills on a controversial plan for a city-owned golf course. The city's redevelopment authority voted yesterday to take a 5-year, adjustable-rate, $7 million line of credit from First Financial Bank. The money will be used to buy and clean up downtown property, including old steel mill ground, for resale to developers who have proposed hundreds of millions of dollars in housing, office and retail construction.
NEWS
November 30, 2003 | By Andrew Maykuth INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
This scenic village on the rugged coast north of San Francisco makes no secret about cherishing its privacy. For years a vigilante squad known as the "Bolinas Border Patrol" has removed all road signs leading to the counterculture enclave, hoping that strangers remain strangers. An unwritten law forbids businesses or landlords from advertising outside the area for fear of attracting outsiders. The Marin County community of 1,263 people has long tolerated unorthodox behavior - beatniks, hippies, self-actualization gurus, unleashed dogs on the beach.
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