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SPORTS
August 1, 2013 | By Matt Breen, Inquirer Staff Writer
Phil Booth, a 6-foot-2 guard from Baltimore, made an oral commitment Tuesday afternoon to play basketball at Villanova. Booth is the program's second recruit for the class of 2014. He chose the Wildcats over Georgetown and also had offers from Indiana, Virginia, and Temple. The senior at Mount St. Joseph High in Baltimore plays AAU basketball for Washington-based Team Takeover, which produced NBA lottery pick Victor Oladipo. ESPN rates Booth as a four-star recruit and ranks him No. 81 in his class.
TRAVEL
April 8, 2013 | By Marc Fisher, Washington Post
Baltimore's Bromo Seltzer Arts Tower, once the city's supreme skyscraper, always delivers a smile. It's a symbol of kitsch and nostalgia, like the city itself. It's a reminder of a gritty past and an uncertain present. Joe Wall, the tower's facility manager, is leading a free tour of the Clock Room, with the story of the tower's heyday (a 20-ton blue bottle of the headache remedy sat atop the building), its decline (a stereotypical Baltimore tale of neglect and despair), and its renaissance (reborn as artists' studios)
SPORTS
April 27, 1988 | By RICH HOFMANN, Daily News Sports Columnist
It happened in Philadelphia for Jeff Stone, and it's starting to happen again in Baltimore. If the oh-for-April Orioles have not reached the end of their rope yet in the case of Stone, they certainly are moving in that direction. The latest in a series of baserunning misadventures by Stone occurred in the ninth inning of last night's 4-2 loss to the Minnesota Twins, the O's 19th consecutive defeat this season. Stone was doubled off second on a line drive caught by Twins shortstop Greg Gagne, effectively killing any Baltimore momentum.
BUSINESS
August 14, 2015 | By Harold Brubaker, Inquirer Staff Writer
Woods Resources Inc., a Langhorne tax-exempt organization that provides services to disabled people and others with special needs, announced a agreement to acquire the National Center on Institutions and Alternatives, a Baltimore human services organization, effective Sept. 1. The deal is Woods' fourth acquisition since June 2012 and will increase its annual revenue to $250 million, a spokeswoman said. Including NCIA, Woods employs 4,300 and provides services to 3,600 children, adolescents, adults, and seniors.
NEWS
June 1, 1992 | by Frank Dougherty, Daily News Staff Writer
An extradition proceeding was scheduled today in Baltimore for Lawrence Paul Jones, who was arrested there Saturday and charged with the slayings of two fellow security guards in Philadelphia. At the hearing, Jones was expected to waive extradition and return to Philadelphia. Two Philadelphia homicide detectives went to Baltimore this morning, prepared to escort him back. But if he decides to fight extradition, the process could drag on for weeks. "That decision is between Jones and his attorney," a Baltimore detective said yesterday afternoon.
NEWS
October 19, 1995 | by Ellen Gray, Daily News Staff Writer By Ellen Gray
Baltimore gets the Inner Harbor, Camden Yards and the aquarium. We get Penn's Landing, the Vet and a view of New Jersey's aquarium. Baltimore gets "Homicide: Life in the Street," which pumps $500,000 a week into the local economy (less per week than a major movie might bring in, but for a far longer period). We nearly had "Philly Heat. " "Homicide" executive producer Tom Fontana, who also did the pilot for "Philly Heat," a drama about firefighters that was set in Philadelphia and starred West Catholic's own Peter Boyle, said he was surprised when ABC didn't pick up the series, which was shot here two years ago. "I love Philadelphia.
NEWS
May 1, 2015 | By Jeff Gammage, Inquirer Staff Writer
Organizers expect a "Philly is Baltimore" protest to draw at least 1,000 people to City Hall on Thursday. The goal, said Deandra Jefferson, a Temple University student and leader of the Philadelphia Coalition for Racial, Economic, and Legal (REAL) Justice, is to support protesters in Baltimore and speak out against police violence. "Under the right conditions, Philadelphia could be a Baltimore," Jefferson said. "It's something we need to talk about. It's not just a Baltimore issue.
NEWS
April 30, 2015 | By Jeff Gammage and Aubrey Whelan, Inquirer Staff Writers
Philadelphia District Attorney Seth Williams has been through it: A young black man dead at the hands of police, an angry community demanding answers. As his office investigated the December shooting death of Brandon Tate-Brown, a 26-year-old African American, Williams said, he had the man's mother, her attorney, and several clergy members review videotapes and statements in the case. In March, Williams announced that the officers involved would face no charges. Many people were irate.
SPORTS
February 7, 2013 | By Frank Fitzpatrick, Inquirer Staff Writer
BALTIMORE - A Ravens broadcaster with the unfortunate name of Gerry Sandusky handed Joe Flacco a microphone during the team's Super Bowl celebration at M&T Bank Stadium early Tuesday afternoon. The 75,000 fans who had waited patiently and noisily for hours to greet him and the new NFL champions screamed madly at the sight of the lanky quarterback, much as a few hundred thousand others had done during the brief but humanity-clogged parade that led him there. Flacco, smiling and waving but looking slightly uncomfortable, peered quickly out at a crowd that in anticipation of his response swayed like a purple sea all around the on-field stage.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 20, 2015 | By Sofiya Ballin, Inquirer Staff Writer
This month, Philly rapper Freeway traveled to Baltimore to join the voices of protest united over the death of Freddie Gray, the 25-year-old man who died after suffering a spinal-cord injury while in police custody. The National Stop the Killing Committee and the Justice League NYC brought Freeway as their spokesman for #BmoreYouthRise, a May 9 daylong event with various demonstrations. The 36-year-old rapper commemorated Gray's life by placing his handprint on the memorial mural on Fulton Street near where police stopped Gray.
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BUSINESS
August 14, 2015 | By Harold Brubaker, Inquirer Staff Writer
Woods Resources Inc., a Langhorne tax-exempt organization that provides services to disabled people and others with special needs, announced a agreement to acquire the National Center on Institutions and Alternatives, a Baltimore human services organization, effective Sept. 1. The deal is Woods' fourth acquisition since June 2012 and will increase its annual revenue to $250 million, a spokeswoman said. Including NCIA, Woods employs 4,300 and provides services to 3,600 children, adolescents, adults, and seniors.
NEWS
July 14, 2015
YOU'D HAVE thought a rock star was in the ballroom, from the way female members of the NAACP had their camera phones out at the Loews Hotel yesterday. There was a star, actually. Only, Marilyn J. Mosby isn't your typical superstar. She's a big-city prosecutor who in May became an overnight sensation after announcing that Freddie Gray's death had been ruled a homicide and that charges had been filed against six officers in his death. A native of inner-city Baltimore, her bold and decisive actions quelled the street unrest that had dragged on for days in the Charm City, fueled by outrage over the death of Gray as well as those of other black males around the country - Michael Brown, Eric Garner and Tamir Rice.
NEWS
July 14, 2015 | By Sofiya Ballin and Sarai Flores, Inquirer Staff Writers
Baltimore State Attorney Marilyn Mosby strode to the podium in the Loews Hotel's Commonwealth Room in Center City Philadelphia on Sunday afternoon. It was reminiscent of when she announced in May the indictment of six Baltimore police officers in connection with the controversial death of 25-year-old Freddie Gray. This time, Mosby was set to deliver the keynote speech at the Women in NAACP (WIN) Summit, a brunch that was part of this week's NAACP annual convention. Her vigor was the same Sunday, as she demanded that African American women "get off of the sidelines and into the game of progress.
SPORTS
June 19, 2015 | BY RYAN LAWRENCE, Daily News Staff Writer rlawrence@phillynews.com
THE BOTTOM of the fourth inning started off promising. Maikel Franco singled and Ryan Howard followed with a double down the rightfield line. But then Domonic Brown was caught looking at a (high) called third strike. Cameron Rupp went down swinging at strike three. Cody Asche stared at strike three. The trio of strikeouts brought boos to Citizens Bank Park, but since a large percent of the park's population was made up of fans adorned in orange, the boos weren't overpowering.
NEWS
June 9, 2015 | By Erin McCarthy, Inquirer Staff Writer
Something about the long rides and the sense of camaraderie first drew Carlos Rogers to competitive cycling when he was 22. About 18 years later, when Rogers relocated to his wife's hometown of Riverton, an idea struck him. "As soon as I moved here, I knew it would be a great town for a criterium [a competitive short-course bike race]," said Rogers. "It's like Mayberry. " The Burlington County community has many qualities reminiscent of Andy Griffith's Mayberry - tree-lined streets, few traffic lights, postcard-perfect homes with large front porches.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 20, 2015 | By Sofiya Ballin, Inquirer Staff Writer
This month, Philly rapper Freeway traveled to Baltimore to join the voices of protest united over the death of Freddie Gray, the 25-year-old man who died after suffering a spinal-cord injury while in police custody. The National Stop the Killing Committee and the Justice League NYC brought Freeway as their spokesman for #BmoreYouthRise, a May 9 daylong event with various demonstrations. The 36-year-old rapper commemorated Gray's life by placing his handprint on the memorial mural on Fulton Street near where police stopped Gray.
NEWS
May 8, 2015 | BY DAN K. THOMASSON
A THUG by any other name, like a rose, is still a thug. Thugs come in all hues - white, brown, black and in between. They even come in police uniforms. Thugs can be found everywhere. The origin of the word "thug" derives from a murderous cult of religious assassins in India during British colonial days who went around strangling their political enemies and anyone else who stood in their way. They worshiped Kali, a god of destruction, hence the term "thug" applies to any cutthroat or ruffian.
NEWS
May 6, 2015
I CAN'T SAY Pamela Geller is "happy" a couple of gunmen showed up shooting Sunday at her in-your-face Muhammad Art Exhibit and Cartoon Contest in Garland, Texas, but she must be pleased that it underscored her longtime warning: Islam is dangerous to democracy and to freedom of speech. She has anointed herself a free-speech (some say hate-speech) advocate and she, as the co-founder of the American Freedom Defense Initiative, recently beat SEPTA in court when the transit system tried to ban bus ads it (and others)
NEWS
May 5, 2015 | By Justine McDaniel, Inquirer Staff Writer
Local government cannot by itself fix problems of violence and unemployment like those brought to light in last week's Baltimore protests, Mayor Nutter said Sunday. Government, philanthropies, and corporations must cooperate to provide education and create employment for struggling inner-city residents, particularly in communities of color, to improve conditions in America, he said. Nutter appeared on the CNN talk show State of the Union with William A. Bell, mayor of Birmingham, Ala.; and U.S. Rep. Chris Van Hollen (D., Md.)
NEWS
May 4, 2015 | By Ronnie Polaneczky, Daily News Columnist
A "DEPRAVED HEART. " Who knew the quaint-sounding phrase - it sounds pulled from a Bronte novel - was an actual legal term? But Baltimore State's Attorney Marilyn Mosby used it yesterday to describe the second-degree murder charge brought against one of the officers in the death of Freddie Gray. Officer Caesar Goodson Jr. allegedly acted with a "depraved heart" when he recklessly drove the van that transported Gray, who was not secured with a seatbelt, to the police station after a bogus arrest.
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