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Baltimore Symphony Orchestra

ENTERTAINMENT
October 29, 1997 | By Lesley Valdes, INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
Yuri Temirkanov, the Russian conductor who is a popular guest with the Philadelphia Orchestra, will take the helm of the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra during its 1999-2000 season. Temirkanov succeeds David Zinman, who recently became music director of Zurich Tonhalle and whose 13-year leadership in Baltimore concludes this season. Temirkanov, 59, will assume partial duties during the 1999-2000 season, but won't officially take the podium as music director until the following season.
NEWS
June 17, 2008 | By Peter Dobrin INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
You didn't like that new score you heard Thursday night? Was there a guest conductor who put you over the moon, and whom you're eager to hear again? Jeremy S. Rothman is the Philadelphia Orchestra's new point person for all these issues and more. Rothman has been named the orchestra's new vice president for artistic planning starting Sept. 1. Rothman, 31, held a similar job with the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra, but arrives with established connections to Philadelphia and this ensemble.
NEWS
January 29, 2000 | By Peter Dobrin, INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
Joseph Castaldo, 72, the charismatic composer and longtime president of the former Philadelphia Musical Academy (later the Philadelphia Academy of the Performing Arts), died Thursday at Thomas Jefferson University Hospital. Mr. Castaldo's works were performed by pianists Andre Watts and Susan Starr, the Philadelphia Orchestra and Baltimore Symphony Orchestra, and several esteemed string quartets. He had cancer for many years, and the onset of the illness had a dramatic affect on his music.
NEWS
March 28, 2002 | By Peter Dobrin INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
Sometimes nothing sounds as sweet as living in the state of young and hungry. The students who make up the orchestra of the Curtis Institute of Music prove this fairly often. They have some things to learn, to be sure, but not that many. And in the last of their three concerts this season, the orchestra of aspiring Piatigorskys and Kreislers showed Tuesday night what some older musicians often forget. It's a dirty little secret of the orchestra world that some players, once they land a post of certain stature and security, basically stop practicing and growing.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 2, 2000 | By Peter Dobrin, INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
The music itself was doomed to be trounced by its political program, as Alexei Tolstoy intimated early on. "The Seventh Symphony arose," he said, "from the conscience of the Russian people, who unwaveringly accepted mortal combat with evil forces. " Well, maybe it did, maybe it didn't. Shostakovich himself said that his Symphony No. 7 was planned well before World War II, "and consequently cannot be seen as a reaction to Hitler's attack. " Still, the composer concedes that he didn't actually start writing the work until July 1941; Germany had just invaded the Soviet Union.
NEWS
October 23, 2010 | By Peter Dobrin, Inquirer Music Critic
The arrival of the baby conductors should surprise no one attuned to the triumph of youth culture and a related bout of orchestral obsequiousness. But to be factual about it, we've been here before - and with salutary consequences. Riccardo Muti was 31 when he first conducted the Philadelphia Orchestra. Esa-Pekka Salonen led the Philadelphians at age 28 - six years before taking over the Los Angeles Philharmonic. This week, Los Angeles once again was the site of the fountain of youth, when the Philadelphia Orchestra imported L.A.'s associate conductor, Lionel Bringuier, after Semyon Bychkov canceled what would have been his long-overdue subscription-concert debut.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 9, 2011 | By Peter Dobrin, Inquirer Music Critic
How much money should the president of a major orchestra be paid? And should the person at the helm when an orchestra slips into bankruptcy be paid less for failing to keep finances afloat - or more, since managing such a crisis is tough? All these factors relate to Allison B. Vulgamore, who is being paid $597,000 a year to lead the Philadelphia Orchestra, which filed for Chapter 11 on April 16. While $597,000 a year is a lot of money, it is not an unusual sum in the industry. Broadly speaking, Vulgamore's compensation is at the middle of a scale that includes 10 top U.S. orchestras.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 29, 2002 | By David Patrick Stearns INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
In years past, the mere sight of John Cage's name in print was reason to turn the page. During the lifetime of this seminal American composer, his talent for calling attention to himself wore me out, the last straw being Europeras, a random scrambling of the opera repertoire (a hat from one role, a tune from another). Cage's signature work, 4'33", which consists of four minutes and 33 seconds of silence, was typical of what was so wearing: After 30 seconds, I got the idea and didn't need to experience the rest.
NEWS
January 26, 1986 | By Stephen Birnbaum, Special to The Inquirer
We'd like to go on a cruise, preferably on the Mississippi River. My husband is confined to a wheelchair, and we were told that the Mississippi Queen is wheelchair-accessible, except for the bathroom. This would not be suitable and we were wondering if it's true. If so, can you recommend any other cruises we could take? It is true that wheelchairs cannot be taken into the bathrooms on the Mississippi Queen's cabins, and the paddlewheeler of the Delta Queen Steamboat Co., the Delta Queen, has fewer accessible areas than her sister ship.
NEWS
December 21, 1987 | By Ann Kolson, Inquirer Staff Writer (David Walstad contributed to this report.)
Word has it that convicted Watergate criminal G. Gordon Liddy, who has become something of a TV personality these days with guest appearances on Miami Vice, The New Adventures of Beans Baxter and even Super Password, is getting his own show. The syndicated chat program, Liddy, which debuts next year, will feature guests "whose views differ from mine," Liddy told TV Guide. Those he'd like to work over in front of a live audience include the Rev. Jesse Jackson, Jessica Hahn and Watergate reporter Carl Bernstein.
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