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Banana Split

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NEWS
June 21, 2013
The deal: Damon Andreacchio toiled for 11 years at Morrone's Water Ice before opening his original Philly Flavors shop in Fairmount 12 years ago. (He has a second at 13th and Pine, and a third set to open in July on 19th Street near Market.) Details: 2004 Fairmount Ave., Open 9 a.m.-midnight, Monday-Saturday; 9 a.m.-11 p.m. Sunday. 215-232-7748. Inside: A clean, bright, red-white-and-blue shop with computerized menu on video screens. Plus about 80 flavors every day. The wait: 5 to 10 minutes on a recent afternoon, more on a hot summer night.
NEWS
May 1, 1988 | By Walter F. Naedele, Inquirer Staff Writer
The great American urge to be the best at something absolutely meaningless came to this Susquehanna River town yesterday. The urge stalked down the main street. It infected the sanity of about 20,000 men, women and children who lined that main street. When the urge left town by late afternoon, it had destroyed 24,000 bananas, 24,000 cherries, 2,500 gallons of ice cream, 300 pounds of cracked nuts and 150 gallons each of chocolate, pineapple and strawberry topping. It was a world-class attempt to make the world's longest banana split.
NEWS
September 17, 1992 | By Judy Baehr, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Everyone knows how to make a banana split: cut a banana length-wise, pile on some ice cream, drench with chocolate syrup, spritz on some whipped cream, add sprinkles or nuts and top with a fat, red maraschino cherry. Right? But what if you're making the world's largest banana split - 1,600 feet long and big enough to feed 10,000 people? You'd better practice by whipping up a small-scale version before you start creating your monument. That's what 60 volunteers from the Interfaith Homeless Outreach Council did last week during a banana-split boot camp at St. Bartholomew's Episcopal Church in Cherry Hill.
NEWS
April 26, 1987 | By Cindy Horowitz, Special to The Inquirer
More than 5,000 people went bananas on Princeton University's Poe Field yesterday as they attempted to break the world's record for the longest banana split. The 4.39-mile dessert, made of 22,000 bananas, 2,000 gallons of ice cream, 780 cans of whipped cream and 525 pounds of nuts, was made - and eaten - by Princeton students and hundreds of other participants to raise money for a community counseling and mental health center. The sundae was the brainchild of Princeton sophomore John Sichel, the vice president of the undergraduate student government.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 16, 2007 | By HOWARD GENSLER gensleh@phillynews.com Daily News wire services contributed to this report
JENNA JAMESON hopes to adapt her book, "How to Make Love Like a Porn Star: A Cautionary Tale," into a biopic - sort of like "A Beautiful Mind," but lower - and she knows who she wants to star. "We're looking hopefully at Scarlett Johansson," she told Britain's FHM. "I think she's beautiful. " Scarlett will surely be flattered. According to hollywoodrag.com, Jenna hopes the film will shoot next year and it, like its viewers, will get a theatrical release. They're registered at the E.R. Bam Margera told FHM he will wed fiancee Missy Rothstein on Feb. 2, in the West Chester area where the "Jackass" prankster is somewhat of a local hero.
NEWS
July 28, 1995 | By John Way Jennings, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Area police and communities are gearing up for the 12th Annual National Night Out, a take-back-the-streets effort in which residents are asked to leave on their porch lights and go out and enjoy their neighborhoods. This year's events, which begin Sunday and end Tuesday, include an outdoor concert, crime-prevention displays, outdoor games and activities and the chance to "dunk" a Shore police chief. More than 8,750 communities from the United States, Canada, U.S. territories and military bases all over the world will be participating in the event.
NEWS
August 6, 1992 | By Doreen Carvajal, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
With the flourish of a pen stroke, Mayor Rendell will end a long-running political mystery today by signing one of three bills regulating the way city supermarkets label prices on their merchandise. He's going to pick his own. Nearly two months after the City Council passed three conflicting bills on the issue, that's the choice he has made, according to City Hall sources. That bill is a compromise. It gives markets the option of placing individual price labels or enlarged shelf tags.
SPORTS
April 9, 1999 | by Paul Hagen, Daily News Sports Writer
Split infinitives? Bad. A split lip? Bad. The old 7-10 split, the 1981 split schedule, a split in the seat of your pants. Bad. All bad. For the Phillies, winning two of their season-opening, four-game series against the Atlanta Braves was sweeter than a banana split. "I don't care if you're the New York Yankees," said closer Jeff Brantley, who pitched out of a bases-loaded situation in the eighth and earned his second save of the season in the Phillies' 6-3 win last night at Turner Field.
SPORTS
October 22, 1996 | by Phil Jasner, Daily News Sports Writer
Derrick Coleman says that, even in the face of the 76ers' three consecutive preseason losses, there is no reason to be discouraged. "None at all," the Sixers forward said, looking ahead to tonight's game against the Los Angeles Clippers in Anaheim. Coleman is listed as questionable after dislocating the pinkie on his right (non-shooting) hand in Saturday night's 119-104 loss to the Washington Bullets in the consolation round of the annual four-team preseason tournament hosted by the Los Angeles Lakers.
NEWS
January 19, 2007 | By Art Buchwald
Editor's note: Art Buchwald last appeared in The Inquirer in 1991. But it is fitting that we run this beloved columnist's final column, which he asked to be distributed following his death, which came on Wednesday at his son's home in Washington. Buchwald, suffering from kidney failure, originally wrote the column on Feb. 8, 2006, after deciding to check into a hospice. He had discontinued dialysis, and one of his legs was amputated below the knee. He subsequently was released from the hospice, survived for nearly a year beyond expectations, wrote a book about his experience, and also resumed writing his syndicated newspaper column.
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NEWS
June 21, 2013
The deal: Damon Andreacchio toiled for 11 years at Morrone's Water Ice before opening his original Philly Flavors shop in Fairmount 12 years ago. (He has a second at 13th and Pine, and a third set to open in July on 19th Street near Market.) Details: 2004 Fairmount Ave., Open 9 a.m.-midnight, Monday-Saturday; 9 a.m.-11 p.m. Sunday. 215-232-7748. Inside: A clean, bright, red-white-and-blue shop with computerized menu on video screens. Plus about 80 flavors every day. The wait: 5 to 10 minutes on a recent afternoon, more on a hot summer night.
SPORTS
November 7, 2011 | By Bill Lyon, For The Inquirer
He was sharp of wit, sharp with his editor's pencil, and sharp with the verbal harpoon he used to deflate the pompous, the self-important, and any puffed-up strutter that had the misfortune to attract his radar, which was always on the setting for fraudulent. And so he would delight in explaining to his Temple journalism classes: The overriding mission of this profession is to comfort the afflicted - and afflict the comfortable. Chuck Newman was a man of varied and eclectic interests, ranging from harness racing to refereeing to teaching, and this much we knew for sure: He was a genuine American original, a qualified character.
NEWS
January 19, 2007 | By Art Buchwald
Editor's note: Art Buchwald last appeared in The Inquirer in 1991. But it is fitting that we run this beloved columnist's final column, which he asked to be distributed following his death, which came on Wednesday at his son's home in Washington. Buchwald, suffering from kidney failure, originally wrote the column on Feb. 8, 2006, after deciding to check into a hospice. He had discontinued dialysis, and one of his legs was amputated below the knee. He subsequently was released from the hospice, survived for nearly a year beyond expectations, wrote a book about his experience, and also resumed writing his syndicated newspaper column.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 16, 2007 | By HOWARD GENSLER gensleh@phillynews.com Daily News wire services contributed to this report
JENNA JAMESON hopes to adapt her book, "How to Make Love Like a Porn Star: A Cautionary Tale," into a biopic - sort of like "A Beautiful Mind," but lower - and she knows who she wants to star. "We're looking hopefully at Scarlett Johansson," she told Britain's FHM. "I think she's beautiful. " Scarlett will surely be flattered. According to hollywoodrag.com, Jenna hopes the film will shoot next year and it, like its viewers, will get a theatrical release. They're registered at the E.R. Bam Margera told FHM he will wed fiancee Missy Rothstein on Feb. 2, in the West Chester area where the "Jackass" prankster is somewhat of a local hero.
SPORTS
April 9, 1999 | by Paul Hagen, Daily News Sports Writer
Split infinitives? Bad. A split lip? Bad. The old 7-10 split, the 1981 split schedule, a split in the seat of your pants. Bad. All bad. For the Phillies, winning two of their season-opening, four-game series against the Atlanta Braves was sweeter than a banana split. "I don't care if you're the New York Yankees," said closer Jeff Brantley, who pitched out of a bases-loaded situation in the eighth and earned his second save of the season in the Phillies' 6-3 win last night at Turner Field.
SPORTS
October 22, 1996 | by Phil Jasner, Daily News Sports Writer
Derrick Coleman says that, even in the face of the 76ers' three consecutive preseason losses, there is no reason to be discouraged. "None at all," the Sixers forward said, looking ahead to tonight's game against the Los Angeles Clippers in Anaheim. Coleman is listed as questionable after dislocating the pinkie on his right (non-shooting) hand in Saturday night's 119-104 loss to the Washington Bullets in the consolation round of the annual four-team preseason tournament hosted by the Los Angeles Lakers.
NEWS
July 28, 1995 | By John Way Jennings, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Area police and communities are gearing up for the 12th Annual National Night Out, a take-back-the-streets effort in which residents are asked to leave on their porch lights and go out and enjoy their neighborhoods. This year's events, which begin Sunday and end Tuesday, include an outdoor concert, crime-prevention displays, outdoor games and activities and the chance to "dunk" a Shore police chief. More than 8,750 communities from the United States, Canada, U.S. territories and military bases all over the world will be participating in the event.
NEWS
September 17, 1992 | By Judy Baehr, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Everyone knows how to make a banana split: cut a banana length-wise, pile on some ice cream, drench with chocolate syrup, spritz on some whipped cream, add sprinkles or nuts and top with a fat, red maraschino cherry. Right? But what if you're making the world's largest banana split - 1,600 feet long and big enough to feed 10,000 people? You'd better practice by whipping up a small-scale version before you start creating your monument. That's what 60 volunteers from the Interfaith Homeless Outreach Council did last week during a banana-split boot camp at St. Bartholomew's Episcopal Church in Cherry Hill.
NEWS
August 6, 1992 | By Doreen Carvajal, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
With the flourish of a pen stroke, Mayor Rendell will end a long-running political mystery today by signing one of three bills regulating the way city supermarkets label prices on their merchandise. He's going to pick his own. Nearly two months after the City Council passed three conflicting bills on the issue, that's the choice he has made, according to City Hall sources. That bill is a compromise. It gives markets the option of placing individual price labels or enlarged shelf tags.
NEWS
November 14, 1990 | By John Corr, Inquirer Staff Writer
John Robbins would like you to know that ice cream is not good for you. Robbins, 46, is the son of the co-founder of the Baskin-Robbins ice cream empire and was expected to take over management of the firm from his father, Irv. Not only did he turn down the job, he declined to accept money from a trust fund set up for him. "My father told me he believed that I was very intelligent, very sincere and very crazy," Robbins said in an interview during...
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