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NEWS
August 1, 2002
Further revelations [emerged last week] about the way dishonest budgeting by former Gov. Christie Whitman crippled [New Jersey's] finances, [which] has dire implications for all of the state's 8 million people. . . . But don't cry for New Jersey; Whitman wasn't alone in her behavior. . . . The fact is that in recent years many states have been run like banana republics. Responsibility gave way to political opportunism, and in some cases to mob rule. When Tennessee considered a tax increase last year, legislators were intimidated by a riot stirred up by radio talk-show hosts.
SPORTS
May 10, 2002 | THE INQUIRER STAFF
San Antonio Spurs forward Tim Duncan edged New Jersey Nets guard Jason Kidd for the NBA's Most Valuable Player Award yesterday in one of the closest votes since the media began voting in 1981. Duncan received 57 first-place votes and 954 points from a panel of 126 sportswriters and broadcasters, while Kidd drew 45 first-place votes and 897 points. Shaquille O'Neal was third with 696 points. The 57-point gap between Duncan and Kidd was the smallest since Karl Malone beat Alonzo Mourning by 54 after the 1998-99 season.
NEWS
November 13, 2001 | Written by staff writer Dan D. Wiggs based on rumor, innuendo, colleagues' exaggerations and Daily News wire services. Got a rumor or innuendo to share? Try dwiggs@phillynews.com
OUTED? Time for some good news: The Taliban appears to have just about tallied its last ban. Osama bin Laden hasn't bin laid out yet, as far as U.S. Defense Secretary Donald Rumsfeld knows. "We have been trying, energetically [to find and do away with the leaders of al Qaeda and Taliban, including bin Laden]," Rumsfeld said yesterday. "But we have not been able to thus far stop them. That is to say, kill them. " But the world knows it's only a matter of time, right?
NEWS
March 1, 2001 | By Jonathan Storm INQUIRER TELEVISION CRITIC
David Milch has the wrong name on his new cop show, Big Apple, which premieres tonight at 10 on CBS. It should be called Big Onion. There are layers and layers and layers to the stories, conspiracies within conspiracies. Peel one investigation away, and there's another. FBI agents scrutinize themselves while they watch criminals. They also frustrate the local cops, who are trying to catch their own crooks while evading federal interference. With everybody making deals with everybody else, just where do the bad guys let off and the good guys begin?
FOOD
December 6, 2000 | By Marilynn Marter, INQUIRER FOOD WRITER
The goal is to try at least one new-to-you food by year's end. Think of it as a personal growth gift or a pre-New Year resolution. To make your culinary adventure easier, try one of the unique specialty fruits - tiny kumquats to Santa Claus melons - available in supermarket produce sections. Mainstream markets have carried a wide selection for decades, yet few types have been tasted by even 2 percent of the population. Kiwifruit took those first steps beyond the fruit basics in the 1960s.
FOOD
September 10, 2000 | By Aliza Green, FOR THE INQUIRER
I'm a fruit-loving fiend, but for some reason I always disliked bananas. Though bananas are considered America's favorite fruit, I disliked their smell and would never eat them. Don't get me wrong, I still enjoyed cooking with them and making dishes such as banana bread pudding and banana cream pie. And my feelings never extended to plantains, the starchy cousin of the banana. It took a restaurant stint to realize what I was missing in the world of bananas. At the time, I served a popular appetizer made from delectable deep-fried ninos (finger-size bananas)
NEWS
August 12, 2000 | By John Meredith
Wouldn't you rather eat a banana than get a shot? I know I would. Science now makes it possible to get a vaccination against hepatitis, which kills an estimated 100 million people per year worldwide, simply by eating a banana. A breakthrough in the field of biotechnology, mode of vaccination virtually eliminates the storage and sterilization concerns previously necessary for injections. It also saves money, costing just 2 cents for a banana instead of $125 for a shot! But this and other marvels of genetic modification are at risk.
NEWS
July 2, 2000 | By John V.R. Bull, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
With elegant decor and imaginative, superbly prepared Chinese cuisine, the new Winds of East is easily one of our finest restaurants. The beautiful place serves Chinese and Japanese cuisine and opened three months ago in a former Boston Market outlet on Lancaster Avenue in Wayne. Except for the fast-food physical layout, you'd never know it ever was anything other than a classy Main Line restaurant. Exquisitely sophisticated, the moderately priced dishes offer great value for the money.
SPORTS
April 28, 2000 | by Dana Pennett, Daily News Sports Writer
The old baseball gods who governed Paul Byrd's life, the ones who laughed and reveled when his ERA ballooned somewhere around par, would have punished him. They would have turned his one teeny-tiny mental mistake into a catastrophe and, worst of all, a loss for his team. Suddenly, though, the gods are being kinder to Byrd. Not overly so. Not so sweet as to reward him with his first win since Sept. 26, but at least friendly enough as to help the Phillies escape with a 5-4 win over the Arizona Diamondbacks yesterday despite his boo-boo.
NEWS
September 27, 1999 | By Mark Jaffe, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The banana has been Claudius Jean Marie's salvation and now it may be his ruin. Celebrated here on the Windward Islands of the Caribbean as "green gold," the banana has provided Jean Marie's family of seven with schooling, electricity, a telephone and a TV. All that is in jeopardy as Jean Marie finds his 5.3-acre banana patch a tiny battleground in a war of international trade and diplomacy between the United States and the European Union....
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