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Banana

NEWS
August 12, 2000 | By John Meredith
Wouldn't you rather eat a banana than get a shot? I know I would. Science now makes it possible to get a vaccination against hepatitis, which kills an estimated 100 million people per year worldwide, simply by eating a banana. A breakthrough in the field of biotechnology, mode of vaccination virtually eliminates the storage and sterilization concerns previously necessary for injections. It also saves money, costing just 2 cents for a banana instead of $125 for a shot! But this and other marvels of genetic modification are at risk.
NEWS
July 2, 2000 | By John V.R. Bull, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
With elegant decor and imaginative, superbly prepared Chinese cuisine, the new Winds of East is easily one of our finest restaurants. The beautiful place serves Chinese and Japanese cuisine and opened three months ago in a former Boston Market outlet on Lancaster Avenue in Wayne. Except for the fast-food physical layout, you'd never know it ever was anything other than a classy Main Line restaurant. Exquisitely sophisticated, the moderately priced dishes offer great value for the money.
SPORTS
April 28, 2000 | by Dana Pennett, Daily News Sports Writer
The old baseball gods who governed Paul Byrd's life, the ones who laughed and reveled when his ERA ballooned somewhere around par, would have punished him. They would have turned his one teeny-tiny mental mistake into a catastrophe and, worst of all, a loss for his team. Suddenly, though, the gods are being kinder to Byrd. Not overly so. Not so sweet as to reward him with his first win since Sept. 26, but at least friendly enough as to help the Phillies escape with a 5-4 win over the Arizona Diamondbacks yesterday despite his boo-boo.
NEWS
September 27, 1999 | By Mark Jaffe, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The banana has been Claudius Jean Marie's salvation and now it may be his ruin. Celebrated here on the Windward Islands of the Caribbean as "green gold," the banana has provided Jean Marie's family of seven with schooling, electricity, a telephone and a TV. All that is in jeopardy as Jean Marie finds his 5.3-acre banana patch a tiny battleground in a war of international trade and diplomacy between the United States and the European Union....
FOOD
July 11, 1999 | By Craig LaBan, INQUIRER FOOD WRITER
I have an acquaintance at the Jersey Shore, a native, who swears he's only eaten salt-water taffy once in his life. And that was one bite of touristica too many. "Why would I send my friends a box of pencil erasers that they'll probably never eat?" he grumbles. I think I know what he means. We stopped at an outlet for a famous brand of local taffy, and the Day-Glo globs we bought there made my teeth ache with artificial sweetness that ended up tasting like bubble gum. And texture?
NEWS
April 23, 1999 | by April Adamson, Daily News Staff Writer
It was Christmas Eve 1995 when they found the fire victims lifeless on the floor. They looked almost human, curled up as if they were sleeping. Twenty-three primates were dead - the Philadelphia Zoo's entire exhibit - and a city mourned the worst tragedy in the history of America's oldest zoo. But today marks a new chapter in Philadelphia Zoo history, a day for renewal and hope. Six will arrive in cages aboard a cargo plane at Philadelphia International Airport - a new, rambunctious family of apes who will help rebuild what was lost.
NEWS
March 18, 1999 | By Mark Weisbrot
The world's two largest trading partners - the United States and the European Union (EU) - are edging toward the brink of a trade war. Over bananas. The confrontation is escalating. The United States has threatened retaliatory tariffs of 100 percent on such seemingly unrelated items as cashmere sweaters and Pecorino cheese (but only the soft kind). What's going on here? Trade disputes usually involve something that affects an important domestic industry or jobs. You might expect - although it hasn't happened - that the U.S. government would go to the mat to defend some of the hundreds of thousands of manufacturing workers who have lost their jobs to our trade deficit over the last year.
NEWS
March 16, 1999 | By William Raspberry
Is this latest U.S.-Europe trade war a matter of high principles, or just a silly little spat over bananas? Whichever it is, it's serious. Already, European companies are reacting with puzzlement and outrage over the U.S. announcement that it will impose 100 percent tariffs on a line of products ranging from Belgian cookies and French handbags to English greeting cards and Scottish cashmere. The issue: Several European nations have rules favoring bananas imported from their former colonies in the Caribbean, while restricting bananas imported from places like Honduras.
NEWS
March 4, 1999 | By Susan Warner and Bob Fernandez, INQUIRER STAFF WRITERS
The United States yesterday declared war on Europe. A trade war, that is. The long-simmering dispute over Europe's banana-import policy yesterday erupted into full-scale war when the Office of the U.S. Trade Representative slapped 100 percent tariffs on $520 million worth of European luxury goods ranging from cashmere sweaters to Italian cheeses and coffeemakers. The U.S. action, which was aimed at European companies, resulted in collateral damage yesterday at DiBruno Bros.
SPORTS
February 8, 1999 | by Les Bowen, Daily News Sports Writer
Success came late to John LeClair. Somehow, he has never quite learned to trust it. As LeClair relentlessly grinds out what should be his fourth successive 50-goal season, his place in the NHL firmament is well-established. Sony PlayStation commercials. A contract that, although it might be a bit of a bargain for the Flyers compared with what other superstars around the league make, still will pay him the tidy sum of $3.6 million this season. A sprawling South Jersey home for his growing family, a block away from that of linemate Eric Lindros.
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