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Band Concert

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NEWS
July 7, 1987 | By Robert McSherry, Special to The Inquirer
A 5-year-old girl was critically injured Saturday night just before a Fourth of July fireworks display at Radnor Senior High School when she tried to run across a road to get to her parents and was struck by a car, Radnor Township police said yesterday. Kathryn Lockridge, of the 300 block of Orchard Way in St. Davids, was leaving a band concert at the high school football field with her uncle about 8:30 p.m. when she ran into Radnor-Chester Road in front of the school campus and was struck by a car near Raider Road, police said.
NEWS
July 18, 2004 | By Gloria A. Hoffner INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
On a rainy July night, the sprawling Garnet Valley High School was empty, dark and quiet except for the faint melody of "April in Paris. " The music drifted past classrooms and down hallways abandoned by students. Following the sound led to the band room and the 24 dedicated musicians of the Delaware County High School All-Star Big Band. "For three weeks, these kids give up all for practice and performance time," said Steve Selfridge, All-Star Big Band codirector and Garnet Valley Elementary School band director.
NEWS
August 7, 1988 | By Neal Thompson, Special to The Inquirer
As part of this year's celebration of the township's 300th birthday, "Hooray for Willingboro," an evening of song, dance and drama, will be performed by a group of 25 students Saturday at John F. Kennedy High School. The show begins at 8 p.m., and admission is free. "Yes, we're celebrating the tricentennial, but we're doing it in the form of a theatrical presentation," said Jack Bloeser, who, in conjunction with the township Recreation Department, conducted a summer-long series of instructional programs and workshops in music, dance, drama and technical theaterfor children.
NEWS
February 29, 2004 | By Gloria A. Hoffner INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Four beats into the cadence, Timothy W. Oliver was hooked. He was in fifth grade when the Centralia High School Band marched past him en route to the homecoming football game and changed his focus from the gridiron to the drum line. Now grown up, Oliver is leading the music as director of athletic bands and the associate director of bands in the Esther Boyer College of Music at Temple University. "I'm a percussionist. The first time I heard the marching band, that was it," Oliver said.
NEWS
July 1, 1993 | By Kay Raftery, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
It just wouldn't be a grand old Independence Day celebration without fireworks, marching bands, decorated floats, hot dogs, ice cream and gallons of soda to quench the thirst. So, to help you get the most out the holiday, following is a roundup of what's happening in your neighborhood: NARBERTH Saturday Narberth is breaking tradition this year. Instead of holding its fireworks on the Fourth, it will celebrate on Saturday. Games, food and entertainment will be available from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. at the community field, Windsor and Wynnewood Avenues.
NEWS
July 2, 1992 | By Nancy Reuter, Louise Harbach and Karla Haworth, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENTS
Fireworks, festivals, food and fun will fill the Fourth in many area municipalities as South Jersey celebrates Independence Day and the founding of the nation. Some towns will be looking further into the past than others: Several, including Willingboro, Haddon Township and Oaklyn, will honor the 500th anniversary of Columbus' landing in the New World. Barrington residents will bury a time capsule to mark the borough's 75th anniversary. Pennsauken will use the occasion to celebrate its own 100th birthday.
NEWS
May 30, 1989 | By Alan Sipress, Inquirer Staff Writer
Inside the cemetery's black metal fence, the soldiers remain regimented even in death. Thousands of white gravestones stretch in precise rows across the cool, shady patches of green into the warm light beyond the trees. Row after row. Column after column. And by the side of each gravestone at Beverly National Cemetery, a small American flag stands at attention. When the breeze blows across the lawns, hundreds of flags waft out, one after another, and then drop back to rest as if in a drill.
BUSINESS
August 28, 1991 | by Rose DeWolf, Daily News Staff Writer The Associated Press contributed to this report
With a march on Washington and a parade on Philadelphia's Parkway this weekend, the AFL-CIO and other groups hope to put a spotlight on what they call Bush administration and congressional neglect of working Americans' needs. Philadelphia's AFL-CIO Council expects at least 5,000 unionists and their families from this area to go to Washington on Saturday and return in time to march in Philadelphia's parade on Monday, said council spokesman Mark Forrest. According to Jim Moran, executive director of Philaposh, a labor-sponsored group that is participating in Philadelphia's parade, local unions had been asked by Lane Kirkland, national president of the AFL-CIO, to cancel their own parades and come to Washington instead.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 3, 1990 | By Tom Di Nardo, Daily News Classical Music Writer
The Mozart on the Square Festival, which opens its 11th season tonight, has endured by adhering to a sure-fire formula. Its concentrated, small-scale May schedule, drawing from the inexhaustible period of Mozart, Beethoven, Haydn, Mendelssohn, and Schubert and played by notable local musicians with a few guest artists, has seemed to guarantee a growing audience. This year, the format of concerts has been slightly altered, stretching out the May schedule for another week. All ten 8 p.m. evening concerts and nine noontime weekday concerts, plus a morning children's concert, will be held at Holy Trinity Church on the northwest corner of Rittenhouse Square.
NEWS
May 13, 1990 | By Nancy Reuter, Special to The Inquirer
Handiwork ranging from a 40-foot glider to a gazebo and silk flowers, created by students from 65 South Jersey schools, will be part of the 26th annual Southern New Jersey Crafts Fair tomorrow through next Sunday at the Deptford Mall, Almonesson and Clements Bridge Roads. All of the student works - about 2,500 entries from 1,900 students are expected - have been made since September, said Al Oman, who along with his son Karl is co-chairman of the crafts fair. Fifth through 12th grades from public, private and parochial schools in eight South Jersey counties, including Burlington, Camden and Gloucester, will be represented, he said.
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NEWS
April 19, 2007 | By Walter F. Naedele INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
January was not a good month for Alene McDermott. On Jan. 2, the West Caln singer had a hysterectomy. "I had two large masses on my ovaries," she said. "Only one tumor was cancerous," but that ovarian cancer had infected a lymph node that physicians could not completely cut out. The cancer had attached itself to a main artery to her left leg. On Jan. 4, still recovering in Lankenau Hospital in Lower Merion, she underwent a second surgery that cut a cancerous lump from her right breast.
NEWS
July 18, 2004 | By Gloria A. Hoffner INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
On a rainy July night, the sprawling Garnet Valley High School was empty, dark and quiet except for the faint melody of "April in Paris. " The music drifted past classrooms and down hallways abandoned by students. Following the sound led to the band room and the 24 dedicated musicians of the Delaware County High School All-Star Big Band. "For three weeks, these kids give up all for practice and performance time," said Steve Selfridge, All-Star Big Band codirector and Garnet Valley Elementary School band director.
NEWS
February 29, 2004 | By Gloria A. Hoffner INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Four beats into the cadence, Timothy W. Oliver was hooked. He was in fifth grade when the Centralia High School Band marched past him en route to the homecoming football game and changed his focus from the gridiron to the drum line. Now grown up, Oliver is leading the music as director of athletic bands and the associate director of bands in the Esther Boyer College of Music at Temple University. "I'm a percussionist. The first time I heard the marching band, that was it," Oliver said.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 21, 2002 | By Tom Moon INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
Robbie Robertson didn't anticipate the effects of so much time travel. He came to last month's South by Southwest music- and mediafest knowing he would be busy. But as he sits in his hotel suite, Robertson marvels at the quick-change act he is performing. The previous evening, he was out on the town, a DreamWorks Records executive checking out an L.A. duo he's developing. Today he's a rock legend, talking about the remixed and enhanced The Last Waltz, the 1978 Martin Scorsese documentary that chronicles the farewell performance by Robertson's old group, The Band.
NEWS
May 15, 1997 | By Valerie Reed, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Souderton Area High School will celebrate a "Week of the Arts" with a series of free programs beginning tomorrow. The celebration, which will continue through May 23, will include concerts, plays and an art exhibit. A band concert at 7:30 p.m. tomorrow will open the series. On Wednesday at 7 p.m., the theater arts classes will present two one-act plays, You the Jury and Love is a Hot Fudge Sundae. Student art will be displayed in the auditorium lobby and school hallways from 6 to 8 p.m. next Thursday.
NEWS
July 3, 1996 | by Renee Lucas Wayne, Daily News Staff Writer
What better place for the nation's birthday party to heat up than here, where Thomas Jefferson and his friends set it off with the signing of the Declaration of Independence? True to form, the primo patriotic events start unfolding today through Sunday, and there's so much to do, the city has invited the rest of the country to drop in. As the Sunoco Welcome America! extravaganza continues, America's First Zoo gets into the act with a Bearthday Party, featuring a teddy bear picnic, parade, storytelling, arts and crafts and more.
NEWS
September 15, 1995 | By Molly Peterson, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Faced with concerns about safety, noise and crowds, the organizers of an all-day, seven-band rock concert in Chandler Field have put their plans on hold. Township officials said the concert, which a committee of about 20 teens and adults had planned for Sept. 30, could cost thousands of taxpayer dollars, and they worried that there would not have been enough time to properly plan the event. Much of the controversy arose from reports that the committee - sponsored by the township's Park and Recreation Board - was considering allowing a "mosh pit. " Moshing is an increasingly popular, chaotic dance ritual in which audience members typically shove one another, crash into one another, and knock one another down.
NEWS
July 1, 1993 | By Kay Raftery, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
It just wouldn't be a grand old Independence Day celebration without fireworks, marching bands, decorated floats, hot dogs, ice cream and gallons of soda to quench the thirst. So, to help you get the most out the holiday, following is a roundup of what's happening in your neighborhood: NARBERTH Saturday Narberth is breaking tradition this year. Instead of holding its fireworks on the Fourth, it will celebrate on Saturday. Games, food and entertainment will be available from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. at the community field, Windsor and Wynnewood Avenues.
NEWS
July 2, 1992 | By Nancy Reuter, Louise Harbach and Karla Haworth, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENTS
Fireworks, festivals, food and fun will fill the Fourth in many area municipalities as South Jersey celebrates Independence Day and the founding of the nation. Some towns will be looking further into the past than others: Several, including Willingboro, Haddon Township and Oaklyn, will honor the 500th anniversary of Columbus' landing in the New World. Barrington residents will bury a time capsule to mark the borough's 75th anniversary. Pennsauken will use the occasion to celebrate its own 100th birthday.
BUSINESS
August 28, 1991 | by Rose DeWolf, Daily News Staff Writer The Associated Press contributed to this report
With a march on Washington and a parade on Philadelphia's Parkway this weekend, the AFL-CIO and other groups hope to put a spotlight on what they call Bush administration and congressional neglect of working Americans' needs. Philadelphia's AFL-CIO Council expects at least 5,000 unionists and their families from this area to go to Washington on Saturday and return in time to march in Philadelphia's parade on Monday, said council spokesman Mark Forrest. According to Jim Moran, executive director of Philaposh, a labor-sponsored group that is participating in Philadelphia's parade, local unions had been asked by Lane Kirkland, national president of the AFL-CIO, to cancel their own parades and come to Washington instead.
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