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Bandstand

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BUSINESS
April 30, 1996 | by Anthony S. Twyman, Daily News Staff Writer
More than $2 million in public and private money will be used to transform the old home of the "Bandstand" television dance show into the West Philadelphia Enterprise Center. Yesterday, those involved in the project gathered at 4548 Market St. to announce the award of $1.8 million from the federal government, $260,000 from the Pew Charitable Trusts and $250,000 from Safeguard Scientifics Inc. of Wayne. "This is a classic textbook example of how economic development should be done with private and public funds," said Della L. Clark, director of the West Philadelphia Enterprise Center.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 28, 1986 | By LOIS KALATA, Special to the Daily News
"Are you goin' there today?" members of South Philadelphia High School's Class of 1960 used to ask in the halls and classrooms. "Are you goin' over there? You know - 'Bandstand.' " In those days the ultimate status symbol was to be seen on WFIL's "American Bandstand," broadcast nationally from studios at 46th and Market streets. Every weekday more than 600 teenagers from all over the country lined up as early as 6 a.m. for the show, which started at 2:30 p.m. and was broadcast over ABC's network starting at 3. Hosted by cherub-faced Dick Clark, "Bandstand" not only made Philadelphia the rock capital of the world, it also was the breeding ground for new dance steps and new stars.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 11, 1986 | By STUART D. BYKOFSKY, Daily News Staff Writer
The "Bandstand" movie is looking for dancers under the age of 21 - and vehicles over the age of 21. Both should be able to move. The movie, to be filmed in Philadelphia starting next month, is a romantic comedy/drama focusing on a few weeks in the lives of a city girl and a suburban boy who meet and fall in love on a Philadelphia TV dance show. The movie takes place in 1965. Production staffers will be taking a close look at teen-age dancers this Sunday night at HB's on the Boulevard, 7015 Roosevelt Boulevard, from 6-10:30 p.m. The dance music will be provided by WIOQ DJ Bob Pantano and $5 admission will be charged.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 17, 1994 | By Tom Moon, INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
One of the mantras of the musical theater work The Mystery of Love has to do with the bandstand. The members of a hard-working rhythm-and-blues band regard the bandstand as a mythological place, where "dreamers come to project their dreams. " Lead singer Shine (an understated, fine portrayal by Robert Tyree) and singer/manager Maceo (Ramon Melindez Moses) believe in the transformations that occur there: When they tell each other "anything can happen on the bandstand," they mean it in the most positive, musical sense.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 18, 2012 | Dan Gross
THERE COULD BE no "Dance City" without "Bandstand," which is why Romeo King is shooting the pilot of his new teen-dance show at the old "Bandstand" location, the former WFIL studios at 46th and Market. King, executive producer of "Dance City," says he wants to help teens focus energy on their talents, not on teenage pressures. The show tapes on July 28 and will be hosted by Mix 106.1 FM's Brian Soscia. For more info on the show, visit dancecitytv.com. The potential program is the latest in a sudden resurgence of teen-dance shows.
NEWS
June 7, 1998 | By Louise Harbach, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Now that she is $500 richer, Melissa Ambricco can thank her middle school guidance counselor for the windfall. In May, Ambricco's architectural rendering of a bandstand and performance platform won the Cherokee High School sophomore top honors and the $500 prize in the annual student design competition sponsored by the West Jersey chapter of the American Institute of Architects. "My counselor suggested that I sign up for mechanical drawing, which I took last year. I liked the course, and this year I decided to take architectural design," said Ambricco, 15, who is thinking of becoming either an engineer or an architect.
NEWS
May 26, 1996 | By Carl Dahlgren
I hate graffiti. I heave a big sigh when I see the Hunting Park bandstand is still free of graffiti seven days after I've painted it over. Many times it has stayed clean of this "art" for three weeks - and once a whole month. This is my seventh year of painting the same building over and over whenever graffiti appear. I doubt if any of the mutilators have been working this same location that long. So who's the weirdo? I write letters to the editor about graffiti. Talk to neighbors.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 8, 2014 | By Molly Eichel
NBC10 IS DOING some housecleaning in the new year, with switches on the anchor desk and a departure of a familiar face. Reporter Steve Highsmith , who hosted "NBC10 @Issue," ended his WCAU tenure in late December, although his Twitter profile still says he's an NBC10 reporter. "@Issue" will continue with a new host to be determined. Highsmith also hosts the Mummers Parade every year on PHL17. He will remain the director of community relations at PHL17, where he has been since 1994.
NEWS
April 23, 2012 | By B.G. Kelley
The Bandstand studio at 46th and Market Streets was old, dreary, and dark — that is, until Dick Clark appeared. Then the lights punched on like a bolt of sunshine, and the gym-like bleacher seats were rolled out with businesslike authority. A certain buzz circulated among the teenagers: Bandstand was about to begin. I went to the studio several times and, on one occasion, took part in one of Clark's famous spotlight dances with a girl I didn't even know. I was able to waltz past the guards at the entrance because I knew one of the regulars.
NEWS
February 13, 1986 | BY PATTI LABELLE
The Rock 'n' Roll Hall of Fame should be here because of the "Philly Sound" and Kenny Gamble and Leon Huff and Dick Clark and "Bandstand" and Chubby Checker and Bobby Rydell and Teddy Pendergrass and the Blue Notes and Fabian and Frankie Avalon and Dee Dee Sharp and Kal Rudman and Mike Douglas and steaks and pretzels and hoagies and when they're through with that stuff, they can come to Patti LaBelle's house for fried chicken.
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ENTERTAINMENT
January 8, 2014 | By Molly Eichel
NBC10 IS DOING some housecleaning in the new year, with switches on the anchor desk and a departure of a familiar face. Reporter Steve Highsmith , who hosted "NBC10 @Issue," ended his WCAU tenure in late December, although his Twitter profile still says he's an NBC10 reporter. "@Issue" will continue with a new host to be determined. Highsmith also hosts the Mummers Parade every year on PHL17. He will remain the director of community relations at PHL17, where he has been since 1994.
NEWS
December 12, 2013 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
  Carole Ann Scaldeferri Spada, 70, of Newtown Square, a regular dancer on American Bandstand from 1957 to 1961, died Sunday, Dec. 8, of congestive heart failure at a Springfield hospital. Her husband, Richard Spada, said Mrs. Spada was recovering from a minor stroke she had suffered earlier when she became ill on the way to church. She was taken by ambulance to the emergency room, where she died, her husband said. "When the doctor told me the news, I was heartbroken," her husband said.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 24, 2013
NAVIGATING iRadioPhilly.com's website or phone app couldn't be easier. The home page brings up a station menu with one-button, "click to listen" access. There's also a "station ticker" on the browser version that tells who and what's playing. Dedicated channel pages list the song currently playing and the last 10 tracks. Only Y-Not Radio and specialty shows such as Bob Craig's "Sunday Morning Magic" on Bell Bottoms and Mike Bowe's Friday "Happy Hour" on Martini Lounge feature live track announcing.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 18, 2012 | Dan Gross
THERE COULD BE no "Dance City" without "Bandstand," which is why Romeo King is shooting the pilot of his new teen-dance show at the old "Bandstand" location, the former WFIL studios at 46th and Market. King, executive producer of "Dance City," says he wants to help teens focus energy on their talents, not on teenage pressures. The show tapes on July 28 and will be hosted by Mix 106.1 FM's Brian Soscia. For more info on the show, visit dancecitytv.com. The potential program is the latest in a sudden resurgence of teen-dance shows.
NEWS
April 23, 2012 | By B.G. Kelley
The Bandstand studio at 46th and Market Streets was old, dreary, and dark — that is, until Dick Clark appeared. Then the lights punched on like a bolt of sunshine, and the gym-like bleacher seats were rolled out with businesslike authority. A certain buzz circulated among the teenagers: Bandstand was about to begin. I went to the studio several times and, on one occasion, took part in one of Clark's famous spotlight dances with a girl I didn't even know. I was able to waltz past the guards at the entrance because I knew one of the regulars.
NEWS
April 22, 2012 | By Kristin E. Holmes, Inquirer Staff Writer
  Former American Bandstand dancer Tommy "Crazy Legs" Davis leaned in to examine the enlarged pictures on the walls in Studio B, looking for himself in the photos that captured the Philadelphia heyday of the rock-and-roll dance party hosted by Dick Clark. Back then, Davis was a thin, 129-pound teenager from Roxborough with curly blond hair. On Saturday, he was an older version of himself with less hair and a few more pounds but the same love for the TV show and Clark, who died Wednesday in Los Angeles at 82. "My biggest thrill was dancing with Patti Page," said Davis, 70, of Jenkintown, who was a regular on the show from 1955 to 1957.
NEWS
April 21, 2012 | By Sam Wood, Inquirer Staff Writer
For seven years, it was a hot spot of teenage American pop culture. From 1957 until 1964, Dick Clark hosted American Bandstand at the West Philadelphia studios of WFIL-TV, where thousands of teens dreamed of appearing on the hit show. But few actually got the chance to dance inside the nondescript building in the shadow of the Market-Frankford El at 46th and Market Streets. If you were one of those teens who yearned for your Bandstand moment, here's your chance.
NEWS
April 20, 2012
A shout-out from Dick Clark In 1956, I was a teenager on a date with my boyfriend, when my life suddenly changed. As we were driving down Broad Street, I was complaining about a Spanish test I had to take the next day. Seconds later, I was slammed against the windshield and thrown to the driver's side. A trolley car had blown through a red light and broadsided our car on the passenger side. My body was twisted and bent, and I remember a funny taste in my mouth and shivers.
NEWS
April 19, 2012 | Ellen Gray
DICK CLARK might have preserved his image as "America's Oldest Teenager" if he'd given up "New Year's Rockin' Eve" after the 2004 stroke that turned him, seemingly overnight, into an old man. But, then, he wouldn't have been Dick Clark. A producer and performer who was juggling multiple TV gigs long before his multitasking New Year's Eve co-host, Ryan Seacrest, was born, Clark, who died Wednesday at age 82, simply wasn't the retiring type. When I met him nearly 10 years ago on the set of NBC's "American Dreams," a show, set in early '60s Philadelphia, about a family whose daughter becomes a dancer on "American Bandstand," Clark was already 72. And though not quite as eerily youthful in person as he still appeared on-screen, he looked pretty good, even by Hollywood standards.
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