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NEWS
December 15, 1991 | By Jonathan Storm, Inquirer Staff Writer
Bangkok is inspired confusion, a city that combines back-country Asia with the most modern conveniences (and inconveniences) of New York or Rome. It's "the Venice of the East," the capital of Southeast Asia (as well as of Thailand), choked and adorned with life. It's not surprising that beautiful prostitutes and Buddhist monks are two of its most characteristic classes or that the city's name really isn't Bangkok. In their ceremonial fashion, the Thais have accorded what seems like an endless string of titles to their social, political and economic capital, giving it the longest official place name in the world.
NEWS
December 24, 1989 | By Donald D. Groff, Special to The Inquirer
We will be visiting Bangkok soon and would like to go to Vietnam for a few days. What will it take for us to do that? J.D., Wyncote It is possible for Americans to visit Vietnam, but arrangements usually must be made outside the United States, as the U.S. government forbids American travel companies from doing business with Vietnam. Being in Bangkok, however, puts you in a good position to sign up with one of several tour companies there that offer such trips. Orbitours, an Australian company, offers trips to Vietnam, Laos and Cambodia that originate in Bangkok.
NEWS
October 17, 2011 | By Todd Pitman and Thanyarat Doksone, Associated Press
BANGKOK, Thailand - Barriers protecting Bangkok from Thailand's worst floods in half a century held firm Sunday as the government said some water drenching provinces just north of the capital had begun to recede. That fueled hopes that Bangkok, a city of nine million, could escape unharmed. But outside the capital, thousands of people remain displaced and hungry residents struggle to survive in half-submerged towns. On Sunday, the military rescued terrified civilians from the rooftops of flooded buildings in the city of Ayutthaya, one of the country's hardest-hit.
NEWS
October 22, 2011 | By Todd Pitman and Thanyarat Doksone, Associated Press
BANGKOK, Thailand - Floodwaters that have devastated Thailand's industry and agriculture seeped into outer Bangkok on Friday as the crowded capital's residents braced for the impact, uncertain if they will soon be hopping over puddles or fording waist-high streams just outside their windows. Thailand's prime minister urged residents of the city of nine million people to get ready to move their belongings to higher ground. Key gates on flood-control canals in the capital have been opened in a risky move to drain the high waters into the sea, but it's not known how much will overflow onto streets.
NEWS
November 27, 1988 | New York Daily News
Asian and European properties dominate the latest listings of the world's top 12 hotels, with one exception from the United States, New York's Carlyle, which was rated the best hotel in the America's and 12th best in the world. The rankings result from a survey by Institutional Investor, a monthly magazine for bankers and the global investment community. It has ranked the world's 50 best hotels since 1977 by surveying senior bankers from around the world. Rated the world's best - for the eighth consecutive year - was the Oriental in Bangkok.
NEWS
October 25, 1987 | By Mike Nichols, Special to The Inquirer
Is it Thailand or Siam? It's Thailand, of course. Has been for almost a half-century. All the maps and atlases call this country Thailand now. But does Siam still exist here, if only intangibly? Do the old ways linger, living with the new, tradition with trend, or has Siam vanished - gobbled up by progress and westernization? And what are the differences, anyway? Thailand is a fact; Siam is a mood. Thailand is a geopolitical certainty; Siam is an image in the traveler's mind, perhaps evoking scenes from The King and I. Thailand is an agrarian nation of 198,000 square miles and about 50 million people, between Laos and Burma; Siam is . . . well, you may not know exactly what Siam is, but you'll know it when you see it. Here in Thailand, can you still go in search of Siam?
NEWS
October 29, 1988 | By C. S. Manegold, Inquirer Staff Writer
Along the dark and crowded alleys of Chinatown's Thieves Market and the cool, carpeted corridors of this hard-sell city's finest art dealerships, the stakes of trading in ancient treasure have always been high. Rare finds and blind luck have more than once transformed a humble, bent- backed junk-seller into a gold-draped millionaire. But bad luck and bad judgment have been at least as common. Fortunes have been made and lost, and so, sometimes, have lives. Bangkok has for years been the center of a multimillion-dollar trade in ancient artwork, not all of which comes from Thailand.
NEWS
June 11, 2000 | By Doug Lansky, FOR THE INQUIRER
You can have some bad luck and end up vacationing next to an erupting volcano, traveling through a capital city during a coup d'etat, or trying to find a hotel room during a surprisingly popular convention of mothball collectors. Or, as is often the case with me, you can just create your own misfortune. The upside is, I now know better. The downside is, it took many years on the road to figure some of this out. Travel Mistake No. 1: Wandering around Europe for three months with a backpack the weight and girth of an automated teller machine.
NEWS
March 8, 1998 | By Leonard W. Boasberg, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Somerset Maugham slept here. Noel Coward slept here. Graham Greene slept here. James A. Michener slept here. Joseph Conrad probably slept here. Now I've slept here. Here is the legendary Oriental Hotel, considered by many the world's best hotel, with a history that goes back at least 120 years. Institutional Investor magazine gave it the No. 1 rating for 10 years running. The publication this year dropped it down a couple of notches, after the Peninsula in Hong Kong, the Bel-Air in Los Angeles, and the Regent in Hong Kong.
NEWS
March 25, 2002 | By Andrew Perrin FOR THE INQUIRER
Ngun Chai sold his 13-year-old daughter into prostitution for the price of a television set. He had no regrets. His wife, Lu, had one. When she discovered that her eldest daughter wasn't working in a bar in a nearby city - as the agent who bought the girl had promised - but was selling her body in a Bangkok brothel to as many as eight men a day, she wept. The tears were not for her daughter. "I should have asked for 10,000 baht [$228], not 5,000," she said. "He robbed us. " The Chai family lives in a thatched hut in Pa Tek village on the outskirts of Mae Sai, a bustling township on Thailand's northern border with the military state of Myanmar, formerly known as Burma.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
May 4, 2015 | By Kellie Patrick Gates, For The Inquirer
Hello there By the time Dave set the dating website's geographic parameters, he'd already fallen in love - with a country. The Barrington, N.J., native spent two semesters in Thailand, taking international business and language courses as a Rutgers student in 2002 and 2004, and he planned to return. He was in New Jersey, working at Cannon in May 2009, when dating website Plenty of Fish introduced him and Sasi, who grew up in Udon Thani and was a third-year IT student at Silpakorn University.
NEWS
January 25, 2013 | By Ronnie Polaneczky, Daily News Columnist
OVER THE NEXT few days, we'll all get to know Jason Smith. He's the 36-year-old Levittown dirtbag who, police said, has confessed to killing Dr. Melissa Ketunuti. We'll learn where he was born and went to school. We'll get the rundown on his exterminating job. We'll find out what neighbors made of him, before they were sickened by news from police that he strangled Ketunuti on Monday, then set her body on fire. And we will hear his version of the events that allegedly provoked him to kill Ketunuti.
NEWS
August 10, 2012 | By Carolyn Davis, Inquirer Staff Writer
When most people crave a good walk, they amble around the block or saunter through a park - maybe even hike a mountain. Not Lower Merion Township native Ali Weiner, a 23-year-old with an ambition that's anything but pedestrian. She and a friend are planning a 180-mile walk in Thailand - from Bangkok to the Myanmar border - for themselves and 20 others to raise awareness of human trafficking and at least $100,000 for anti-trafficking groups. The trek is scheduled for November, when the rainy season is over and temperatures are more moderate.
NEWS
February 16, 2012 | By Thanyarat Doksone and Jocelyn Gecker, ASSOCIATED PRESS
BANGKOK - Thailand's police chief said the Iranians who were arrested after accidentally setting off explosives at their rented home in Bangkok were plotting to attack Israeli diplomats, bolstering claims by Israel that the group was part of an Iranian-backed network of terror. "I can tell you that the target was specific and aimed at Israeli diplomatic staff," police chief Gen. Prewpan Dhamapong told a Thai television station late Wednesday. He also confirmed that the type of explosive - a homemade "sticky" bomb - found at the blast site Tuesday matched the devices planted on Israeli diplomatic cars in India and Georgia a day earlier.
NEWS
February 15, 2012 | By Thanyarat Doksone and Todd Pitman, Associated Press
BANGKOK, Thailand - Israel accused Iran of waging a covert campaign of state terror that stretched this week from the Middle East to the heart of Asia after a bungled series of explosions led to the capture of two Iranians in Bangkok. Authorities in Israel ratcheted up security at home and abroad after Tuesday's explosions in the Thai capital, escalating a confrontation over Iran's suspect nuclear program and raising fears of war. On Monday, an Israeli diplomat's wife and driver were wounded in New Delhi when a bomb stuck to their minivan exploded, and another device was defused on an Israeli Embassy car in Tbilisi, Georgia.
NEWS
January 17, 2012
U.S. and Israel delay war games JERUSALEM - The Israeli and U.S. militaries have postponed large-scale war games, in part to avoid aggravating mounting tensions between the international community and Iran over its disputed nuclear program, Israeli defense officials said Monday. The missile-defense exercise, dubbed "Austere Challenge 12," was scheduled for April to improve defense systems and cooperation between U.S. and Israeli forces. The Israeli military confirmed that the drill would be rescheduled for the second half of 2012, but did not disclose reasons for the postponement or any other details.
NEWS
December 9, 2011
PATTAYA, THAILAND - If you are going to run from your troubles, run far. In the wake of a personal hurricane that tore apart my life, I ran all the way to Thailand. Every journey is both external - where you went - and internal - how you felt. I am feeling good - and bad. My journey reconnected me with my college friend Paul DeCeglie, who ran here to something, not from something. It's now his permanent home. He ran to weather he liked, a lower cost of living, a laid-back Thai lifestyle and low-cost, no-guilt sex. It was my first time in Asia, exotic and different - the language, the architecture, the sounds, the smells, the customs.
NEWS
November 7, 2011 | By Todd Pitman, Associated Press
BANGKOK, Thailand - The death toll from Thailand's worst floods in half a century climbed past 500 Sunday, as advancing pools of polluted water threatened Bangkok's subway system and new evacuations were ordered in the capital. The latest district added to the government's evacuation list was Chatuchak, home to a major public park and an outdoor shopping zone that is a major tourist attraction. The Chatuchak Weekend Market was open but missing many vendors and customers Sunday as floodwaters poured past the market's eastern edge for a second day. So far, Bangkok Gov. Sukhumbhand Paribatra has ordered evacuations in 11 of Bangkok's 50 districts, and partial evacuations in seven more.
NEWS
October 29, 2011 | By Todd Pitman And Thanyarat Doksone, ASSOCIATED PRESS
BANGKOK - The complex network of flood defenses erected to shield Thailand's capital from the country's worst floods in nearly 60 years was put to the test Saturday as coastal high tides hit their peak. No major breaches were immediately reported. Fear gripped Bangkok early in the day as tides along the Gulf of Thailand crested at about 9 a.m. and pushed the city's main waterway, the Chao Phraya river, to its brink. Overflows so far have lightly inundated riverside streets from Chinatown to the famed Temple of the Emerald Buddha.
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