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Bangkok

NEWS
December 15, 1991 | By Jonathan Storm, Inquirer Staff Writer
Bangkok is inspired confusion, a city that combines back-country Asia with the most modern conveniences (and inconveniences) of New York or Rome. It's "the Venice of the East," the capital of Southeast Asia (as well as of Thailand), choked and adorned with life. It's not surprising that beautiful prostitutes and Buddhist monks are two of its most characteristic classes or that the city's name really isn't Bangkok. In their ceremonial fashion, the Thais have accorded what seems like an endless string of titles to their social, political and economic capital, giving it the longest official place name in the world.
NEWS
August 11, 1991 | By Mark Fazlollah, Inquirer Staff Writer
David D. Longmaid was a World War II spy, helped stop a cholera epidemic in Bangkok, headed several Philadelphia-area planning agencies and aided Chester County environmental activists. Mr. Longmaid, 73, a resident of Marshallton, died Aug. 3 at Bryn Mawr Hospital. When he was fresh out of Yale University with a degree in architecture, the Navy sent Mr. Longmaid, then a lieutenant, to the front lines on Omaha Beach with a forward intelligence unit during the D-Day invasion.
NEWS
December 31, 1990 | By Vernon Loeb, Inquirer Staff Writer
Twenty miles up-river from here, at a campus carved out of the jungle, Burma's best and brightest now attend what may be the ultimate school of hard knocks. On the untamed border between Burma and Thailand, there is no escaping the mosquitoes, or the malaria, or the hunger, or the loneliness, or the uncertainty. And for those who survive the jungle's challenge, the fight against the hated Burmese army often ends in death. There once were 7,500 Burmese students in the border camps, where they fled two years ago after Burma's military dictatorship brutally snuffed the nation's tempestuous democracy movement.
FOOD
July 22, 1990 | By Elaine Tait, Inquirer Restaurant Critic
"Is the food here spicy hot?" my chili-loving partner at a Bangkok Cuisine review meal wanted to know. The restaurant's maitre d' told my friend that a visitor from India had asked for the house's hottest spicing, and that the dishes the customer requested had brought tears at first bite. "Is everything all right?" the maitre d' had asked the customer, only to hear that the chili-induced tears were tears of joy. I retell the story to warn diners that the Overbrook Park restaurant can concoct the hottest of dishes.
FOOD
January 17, 1990 | The Inquirer staff
Not long ago, many Thais thought milk made them sick and cheese was smelly stuff, but a younger generation is gulping down milk and devouring cheese- topped pizzas all across Bangkok. "I think the nutritional qualities of milk are well-understood here," said Mauri Uotila, of the Bangkok office of the United Nations Food and Agriculture Organization. "People here see tall European and American people drinking a lot of milk. I think, like all parents, they want taller children with stronger bones.
NEWS
December 24, 1989 | By Donald D. Groff, Special to The Inquirer
We will be visiting Bangkok soon and would like to go to Vietnam for a few days. What will it take for us to do that? J.D., Wyncote It is possible for Americans to visit Vietnam, but arrangements usually must be made outside the United States, as the U.S. government forbids American travel companies from doing business with Vietnam. Being in Bangkok, however, puts you in a good position to sign up with one of several tour companies there that offer such trips. Orbitours, an Australian company, offers trips to Vietnam, Laos and Cambodia that originate in Bangkok.
FOOD
April 2, 1989 | By Joyce Gemperlein, Special to The Inquirer
The milkman was late - the coconut milkman, that is - and speculation was that he and his precious load were trapped in Bangkok's choking morning-rush- hour traffic. Chalie Amatyakul, dressed all in white as usual, threw up his hands and leaned on a counter, where herbs and other ingredients - lemongrass, three kinds of fragrant basil, fresh peppercorns, little green chilies called prig khee nu and red chilies, among others - sat in small glass bowls. Behind him, in the demonstration kitchen of the Thai Cooking School of the Oriental Hotel, bronze woks were being shined and placed on burners.
NEWS
March 9, 1989 | By Vernon Loeb, Inquirer Staff Writer
It has financed hotels here and fueled an international industry. It also has killed more than a few of the foreigners who come to shoot the white powder into their veins, so pure and so cheap is it on the streets. Heroin has long been the most important commodity in Chiang Mai, gateway to the Golden Triangle. And this may be the biggest year for heroin that Chiang Mai has ever seen. The weather in the five months before the January opium harvest was perfect in the mountainous stretches of the triangle, where Burma, Thailand and Laos come together about 500 miles north of Bangkok.
NEWS
November 27, 1988 | New York Daily News
Asian and European properties dominate the latest listings of the world's top 12 hotels, with one exception from the United States, New York's Carlyle, which was rated the best hotel in the America's and 12th best in the world. The rankings result from a survey by Institutional Investor, a monthly magazine for bankers and the global investment community. It has ranked the world's 50 best hotels since 1977 by surveying senior bankers from around the world. Rated the world's best - for the eighth consecutive year - was the Oriental in Bangkok.
NEWS
November 22, 1988 | By Donna Gallagher, Special to The Inquirer
Mikey Fabulous was working the door. He had flown in from Bangkok to help out with the Bank's preview party last month and had decided to stick around until January. The native Philadelphia designer was wearing a shiny black jumpsuit made of PVC, the material equivalent of an oil slick. It was accented nicely by a new-wave pompadour and glittery gold boots with spike heels. On the other side of the door, a line was forming slowly. Many of its inhabitants were dressed in black, trying to outdo the night.
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