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NEWS
April 30, 1991 | Daily News Wire Services
More than 200 people have been killed in the most powerful cylone to hit Bangladesh in two decades, and officials said today they feared the toll could rise into the thousands. The storm, with winds of 145 miles an hour, roared in from the Bay of Bengal at about midnight and battered 14 districts for more than seven hours, uprooting trees and ripping apart telephone and power lines, said a Relief Ministry official. The airport at Chittagong, Bangladesh's second largest city after Dhaka, was under three feet of sea water.
NEWS
May 1, 2013 | By Chris Blake, Associated Press
SAVAR, Bangladesh - The heat in the rubble was sweltering. It closed in on his body like the darkness around him, making it hard to breathe. Working by the faint glow of a flashlight, he slithered through the broken concrete and spotted a beautiful young woman, her crushed arm pinned beneath a pillar. She was dying, and the only way to get her out was to amputate. But Saiful Islam Nasar had no training, and almost no equipment. He's a mechanical engineer who just days earlier rushed hundreds of miles from his hometown in southern Bangladesh when he heard the Rana Plaza factory building had collapsed and hundreds, perhaps thousands, of garment workers were trapped.
NEWS
March 23, 2013
Bangladesh's figurehead president, Zillur Rahman, 84, died Wednesday at a hospital in Singapore, where he had been flown March 10 for treatment of respiratory problems. Mr. Rahman, a close aide to the country's founder, Sheikh Mujibur Rahman, was a top leader of the ruling Awami League party before Parliament elected him president in 2009. The government declared three days of mourning starting Thursday. The death does not affect the government because Bangladesh is a parliamentary democracy, with the prime minister holding executive powers.
NEWS
September 12, 1988 | By Marc Kaufman, Inquirer Staff Writer
As a helicopter carrying relief supplies began to circle this patch of dryness in the flooded sea of the Bangladesh countryside, thousands of people ran to the soccer field where it would land. They pushed and shoved to get closer, finally being beaten back by a line of policemen with wooden sticks. Army officers ran out quickly and began unloading the day's supply of relief goods. There were several cases of powdered milk from Australia, a few sacks of rice from the United States, some fried fish from China, baby formula from Holland and several bags of used clothes.
NEWS
April 26, 2013
SAVAR, Bangladesh - The number of people killed when a garment-factory building collapsed in the city Wednesday has been increased to 238, authorities said. After seeing deep cracks in the walls of the building Tuesday, police ordered it evacuated. But officials at the garment factories operating inside ignored the order and kept more than 2,000 people working, authorities said. The disaster in Savar is the worst ever for Bangladesh's booming garment industry, surpassing a fire five months ago that killed 112. Instead, very little has changed in Bangladesh, where wages, among the lowest in the world, have made it a magnet for numerous global brands.
NEWS
September 11, 1988 | By Marc Kaufman, Inquirer Staff Writer
The unprecedented floods now covering about three-quarters of Bangladesh are as much the result of massive environmental destruction in the region as of monsoon rains, experts believe. As a result, those officials are predicting that flooding on a massive scale may soon become the norm, and that development in the already poor and underdeveloped country of 110 million people might come to a dramatic halt. "What we seem to be looking at with these floods is a remarkable collapse of the Himalayan ecosystem," said A. Atiq Rahman, director of the Institute for Advanced Studies in Dhaka, one of the country's few groups involved with environmental concerns.
NEWS
April 26, 2013 | By Julhas Alam, Associated Press
SAVAR, Bangladesh - Rescuers tried to free dozens of people believed trapped in the concrete rubble after an eight-story building that housed garment factories collapsed, killing at least 87. Workers had complained about cracks in the structure before it came tumbling down, but were assured it was safe. Searchers cut holes in the jumbled mess of concrete with drills or their bare hands, passing water and flashlights to those pinned inside the building near Bangladesh's capital of Dhaka.
NEWS
December 4, 2001 | By Jeff Hurvitz
A few weeks ago, a rock concert took place in Madison Square Garden as a tribute to the fallen heroes of the World Trade Center. It was hard to believe that 30 years had passed since the first such fund-raiser was held at that same venue, but for the benefit of those in a land far removed. With news of the passing of George Harrison, we are reminded that perhaps the greatest contribution of this gifted musician was the idea that great popular artists should gather resources and benefit the less fortunate.
NEWS
June 2, 1991 | By Karen McAllister, Special to The Inquirer
Radnor School District and the American International School in Dhaka, Bangladesh, are forming a partnership to establish an educational link between two very diverse cultures. The novel idea, which was approved last week by the Radnor school board, was proposed by Frances Rhodes, the new superintendent of the American International School. Rhodes recently resigned as the superintendent of the North Penn School District. "Our mission is to educate the students to be citizens of a global society, which meant to us, to make them aware of people across the world," Radnor Superintendent John A. DeFlaminis said Thursday.
NEWS
May 9, 1992 | By Vernon Loeb, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Never mind that the rains and the winds were picking up and the storm warning to end all storm warnings, the Great Danger Signal No. 10, was in effect. Or that his home was made of bamboo sticks and straw mats 50 yards off the beach, about as close to Ground Zero as he could get. Muhammad Taher thought his family could sit tight and wait out the storm, like most people on this barrier island in the Bay of Bengal. There had been plenty of false alarms over the years, and if there really were a cyclone this time, Taher reasoned, a 15-foot brick embankment along the shoreline would surely protect them from harm.
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ENTERTAINMENT
December 4, 2013 | By Elizabeth Wellington, Inquirer Fashion Writer
As shoppers begin to grasp the reality that making apparel in America - or better yet, in their hometowns - is not just a matter of style but also a way to build local economies, the news of SA VA's demise is just plain bad. Designer Sarah Van Aken, 37, let slip in a recent speech to the Alliance of Women Entrepreneurs that she was on the "precipice of an epic failure. " In other words, SA VA, her work-appropriate dresses, roomy trousers, and slouchy sweaters, all manufactured in her Port Richmond facility, would be no more.
NEWS
November 19, 2013 | By Jonathan Lai, Inquirer Staff Writer
CAMDEN When Salima Mostafa received word this year of her acceptance into the White House internship program, she knew it was an opportunity she had to take, if she could. It was a big moment - for her, her immigrant family, and Rutgers University-Camden. Mostafa, a first-generation college student who had holed up in her room each night for four years and consistently maxed out her course load, was about to graduate cum laude and was preparing to take medical school entrance exams.
NEWS
June 14, 2013 | By Ravi Nessman, Associated Press
DHAKA, Bangladesh - Bangladeshi garment factories are routinely built without consulting engineers. Many are located in commercial or residential buildings not designed to withstand the stress of heavy manufacturing. Some add illegal extra floors atop support columns too weak to hold them, according to a survey of scores of factories by an engineering university that was shown to the Associated Press. A separate inspection, by the garment industry, of 200 risky factories found that 10 percent of them were so dangerous that they were ordered to shut.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 23, 2013 | By Elizabeth Wellington, Inquirer Fashion Writer
If nothing else, so-called fast fashion is cute. A Michael Kors-esque striped maxi skirt for $25 at Zara? I can always rationalize that purchase, right? Not really. Fast fashion may keep us on trend within a small budget, but it has done considerable damage to our local and national economy by stuffing our closets with subpar clothing made by workers paid the lowest wages. At its worst, fast fashion is actually killing people. In the last year, several deadly accidents - including one fire that killed 112 people - have taken place at manufacturing facilities in Bangladesh, the second-largest exporter of clothing in the world and one of the world's poorest nations.
NEWS
May 14, 2013
NEW ORLEANS - Police have identified a suspect in the shooting of 19 people during a Mother's Day parade in New Orleans. Police Superintendent Ronal Serpas said last night that they were looking for 19-year-old Akein Scott. He said multiple people identified Scott as the shooter. Three gunshot victims remained in critical condition yesterday, though their wounds didn't appear to be life-threatening. Most of the injured had been released from the hospital. Video released earlier in the day shows a crowd gathered for a boisterous second-line parade Sunday suddenly scattering in all directions, with some falling to the ground.
NEWS
May 12, 2013 | By Julhas Alam and Farid Hossain, Associated Press
SAVAR, Bangladesh - A seamstress who survived 17 days before being rescued from a collapsed garment factory building was panicked, dehydrated, and suffering from insomnia as she recovered in a Bangladesh hospital Saturday, but was in generally good condition, according to her doctors. The rescue Friday of Reshma Begum, 19, brought a boost to the workers who had spent more than two weeks pulling decaying bodies from the rubble. By Saturday, they had resumed their grim task and the death toll surpassed 1,100 in the world's worst garment-industry disaster.
NEWS
May 9, 2013
Dhaka toll tops 800; fire strikes DHAKA, Bangladesh - A fire has raced through an 11-story building housing a garment factory and residential complex in Bangladesh's capital, killing at least eight people. Officials said the fire broke out late Wednesday. By early Thursday, firefighters had found eight people dead. They said the factory was on the first and second floors, while the uppers floors were used as a residential complex. The factory was closed during the accident. A police official and the owner of the factory were among the dead.
NEWS
May 1, 2013 | By Chris Blake, Associated Press
SAVAR, Bangladesh - The heat in the rubble was sweltering. It closed in on his body like the darkness around him, making it hard to breathe. Working by the faint glow of a flashlight, he slithered through the broken concrete and spotted a beautiful young woman, her crushed arm pinned beneath a pillar. She was dying, and the only way to get her out was to amputate. But Saiful Islam Nasar had no training, and almost no equipment. He's a mechanical engineer who just days earlier rushed hundreds of miles from his hometown in southern Bangladesh when he heard the Rana Plaza factory building had collapsed and hundreds, perhaps thousands, of garment workers were trapped.
NEWS
April 26, 2013
SAVAR, Bangladesh - The number of people killed when a garment-factory building collapsed in the city Wednesday has been increased to 238, authorities said. After seeing deep cracks in the walls of the building Tuesday, police ordered it evacuated. But officials at the garment factories operating inside ignored the order and kept more than 2,000 people working, authorities said. The disaster in Savar is the worst ever for Bangladesh's booming garment industry, surpassing a fire five months ago that killed 112. Instead, very little has changed in Bangladesh, where wages, among the lowest in the world, have made it a magnet for numerous global brands.
NEWS
April 26, 2013 | By Julhas Alam and Al-Emrun Garjon, Associated Press
SAVAR, Bangladesh - "Save us, brother. I beg you, brother," Mohammad Altab moaned to the rescuers who could not help him. He had been trapped for more than 24 hours, pinned between slabs of concrete in the ruins of the garment factory building where he worked. "I want to live," he pleaded, his eyes glistening with tears as he spoke of his two young children. "It's so painful here. " Altab, whose fate was unclear Thursday night, should not have been in the building when it collapsed Wednesday, killing at least 238 people.
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