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NEWS
July 8, 1987 | By Ann Kolson, Inquirer Staff Writer
Max is 27, an up-and-coming ad writer. Nora is 41 years old and blowzy, a waitress at a hamburger stand. The love affair between these unlikely characters - he is as fastidious, well-read and middle-class as she is slatternly, uneducated and lower-class - is the focus of White Palace, an arresting first novel by Glenn Savan. It is one of two debut titles, along with Ann Hood's Somewhere Off the Coast of Maine, starting the Bantam New Fiction series of trade paperbacks this month.
NEWS
September 9, 1994 | By S. Joseph Hagenmayer, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Mark Homan, 35, a Cherry Hill photographer who traveled the country in search of photos and adventure, died Friday when a plane in which he was a passenger crashed near the Pottstown-Limerick Airport in Montgomery County, Pa. Mr. Homan operated his own photography studio in Cherry Hill, and particularly loved doing portraiture. One of his most recent pictures - of running back Herschel Walker holding a child - was done for an "Eagles Fly for Leukemia" advertisement. He also traveled often for Bantam Books to photograph such celebrities as former President Jimmy Carter, test pilot Chuck Yeager, former Chrysler chairman Lee Iacocca and author Rita Mae Brown.
NEWS
January 2, 1991 | By Fawn Vrazo Compiled from reports from Inquirer wire services
DISPELLING A HEALTH SCARE After recent research linked the use of barrier contraceptives with hypertension (pre-eclampsia) during pregnancy, some gynecologists advised women not to use barrier birth control at all. Relax, says the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development. Its study involving more than 13,000 pregnant women found no association between this life-threatening condition and a woman's use of diaphragms, sponges, spermicides or condoms. COLDS AND CHILDREN Children under age 5 who stay at home can expect six to eight colds a year, while those in day care can expect to catch eight to 12. Add a few bouts of vomiting or diarrhea and a normal child may have an infection once a month or more, notes Woman's Day magazine.
BUSINESS
June 26, 1986 | By ROBIN PALLEY, Daily News Staff Writer
Hotter than a Chrysler cruising down the sizzling asphalt on a 90-degree afternoon. Hotter than "Valley of the Dolls," and "Jaws," too. It's "Iacocca," the book, again. The autobiography of business superstar Lee Iacocca - a hard-cover best- seller since late 1984 - is blazing like Fourth of July fireworks over the Statue of Liberty during its first few days of paperback release. How hot? So hot that the Chrysler chairman's words went to a second printing - bringing the soft-cover total to 3 million copies - even before it was officially on sale, said Stuart Applebaum, vice president of publicity for Bantam Books.
BUSINESS
March 6, 1987 | By Barbara Demick, Inquirer Staff Writer
One man's meat is another man's poison, or so they say. Such was certainly the case with the Tower Commission Report, which was bringing new highs for the book publishing industry at the same time the Reagan administration was sinking to fresh lows. The 576-page unabridged paperback version appeared at bookstores at 11 a.m. Monday, exactly four days after the Tower Commission released its finding on the Iran arms scandal. On Wednesday, co-publishers Bantam Books and Times Books ordered a third printing that will bring the total number of copies in print to 700,000.
NEWS
August 22, 1994 | by Lewis Beale, New York Daily News
This fall, "Frankenstein" will come to life in more ways than one. Just as director Kenneth Branagh's take on the Mary Shelley classic hits movie theaters in November, bookstores will be flooded with two versions of the story: the 1818 original and a new paperback edition based on the screenplay, known in the trade as a novelization. Call it what you want, it's still big business. With novelizations, "you tap into a market of book buyers who are maybe not reading The New York Times Book Review but are readers and are looking for something they're familiar with," says Peter Borland, head of the film and TV division at Signet Books.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 5, 1990 | By Richard Fuller, Special to The Inquirer
The paperback editions of his books used to appear in August, usually along with the latest hardback. Then an editor must have said, "Yo, Stevie! We should be coming out in October, the time of the pumpkin, Halloween!" Yes, faithful fans, give a big welcome to Stephen King, who could be held personally responsible for the fact that horror prose is threatening the shelf space of almost everything else, including knitting and potpourri manuals. In King's latest paperback, The Dark Half (Signet, $5.95)
NEWS
June 4, 1991 | By Carlin Romano, Inquirer Book Critic
Daniel Quinn, a 55-year-old writer from Austin, Texas, has won the much publicized $500,000 Turner Tomorrow Award for his novel Ishmael, A Series of Philosophical Conversations between a man and - the title character - a great ape. Ted Turner, who established the international fiction contest 18 months ago, announced the award yesterday at the American Booksellers Association convention here and said Bantam Books would co-publish it with him...
NEWS
July 25, 1997 | By Susan Caba, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Italian fashion designer Gianni Versace had been dead just three days when the first deal for a book on Andrew Cunanan was signed in New York. St. Martin's Press - publisher of quickie crime books about Amy Fisher, O.J. Simpson, Jeffrey Dahmer and John E. du Pont - has enlisted crime author Wensley Clarkson to pen Cunanan's biography. And yesterday, Delacorte Press announced it had signed Vanity Fair correspondent Maureen Orth to write a book, to be published in the spring.
LIVING
December 6, 1998 | By Maureen M. Carmen, FOR THE INQUIRER
Sleigh bells, jingle bells, piped-in carols at the malls. Noise, noise, noise. Gentle reader, let's seek a quiet nook, pull out a cherished volume, and escape the din. Here, for your consideration, is a sampling of the holiday season's romance bounty. Once again, we have rated the books from one heart (yawn) to four hearts (gasp). Happy holidays. CHRISTMAS KNIGHT By Christina Skye. Avon. $6.50 paper Set in (somewhat) contemporary Scotland, Christmas Knight tells the story of lovely Hope O'Hara, who uses all her financial resources to buy and restore an old Scottish inn. Three very well-meaning neighbors, the Wishwells, decide to help out a wee bit by casting a spell to bring a warrior forward from the 13th century into the 20th.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
LIVING
December 6, 1998 | By Maureen M. Carmen, FOR THE INQUIRER
Sleigh bells, jingle bells, piped-in carols at the malls. Noise, noise, noise. Gentle reader, let's seek a quiet nook, pull out a cherished volume, and escape the din. Here, for your consideration, is a sampling of the holiday season's romance bounty. Once again, we have rated the books from one heart (yawn) to four hearts (gasp). Happy holidays. CHRISTMAS KNIGHT By Christina Skye. Avon. $6.50 paper Set in (somewhat) contemporary Scotland, Christmas Knight tells the story of lovely Hope O'Hara, who uses all her financial resources to buy and restore an old Scottish inn. Three very well-meaning neighbors, the Wishwells, decide to help out a wee bit by casting a spell to bring a warrior forward from the 13th century into the 20th.
NEWS
July 25, 1997 | By Susan Caba, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Italian fashion designer Gianni Versace had been dead just three days when the first deal for a book on Andrew Cunanan was signed in New York. St. Martin's Press - publisher of quickie crime books about Amy Fisher, O.J. Simpson, Jeffrey Dahmer and John E. du Pont - has enlisted crime author Wensley Clarkson to pen Cunanan's biography. And yesterday, Delacorte Press announced it had signed Vanity Fair correspondent Maureen Orth to write a book, to be published in the spring.
LIVING
November 10, 1994 | By Tanya Barrientos, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Let's go over this one more time. There is reality and there is fiction. Sitcoms are fiction. Make-believe. Of course the actors are real. But - and this is the part that is confusing to some people - the actors play characters, and characters are fiction. Remember? Apparently publishers don't. They've created a new genre of books, penned by comedians using the voice of their fictional characters. Those characters spout philosophy, humor and bons mots to real people, with real money, who buy the tomes.
NEWS
September 9, 1994 | By S. Joseph Hagenmayer, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Mark Homan, 35, a Cherry Hill photographer who traveled the country in search of photos and adventure, died Friday when a plane in which he was a passenger crashed near the Pottstown-Limerick Airport in Montgomery County, Pa. Mr. Homan operated his own photography studio in Cherry Hill, and particularly loved doing portraiture. One of his most recent pictures - of running back Herschel Walker holding a child - was done for an "Eagles Fly for Leukemia" advertisement. He also traveled often for Bantam Books to photograph such celebrities as former President Jimmy Carter, test pilot Chuck Yeager, former Chrysler chairman Lee Iacocca and author Rita Mae Brown.
NEWS
August 22, 1994 | by Lewis Beale, New York Daily News
This fall, "Frankenstein" will come to life in more ways than one. Just as director Kenneth Branagh's take on the Mary Shelley classic hits movie theaters in November, bookstores will be flooded with two versions of the story: the 1818 original and a new paperback edition based on the screenplay, known in the trade as a novelization. Call it what you want, it's still big business. With novelizations, "you tap into a market of book buyers who are maybe not reading The New York Times Book Review but are readers and are looking for something they're familiar with," says Peter Borland, head of the film and TV division at Signet Books.
NEWS
December 20, 1992 | By Lucinda Fleeson, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Now, Mission! Now, Country! Now, Minimal and Deco! On, Federal! On, Prairie! On, Nouveau and Eco! The annual home-design books have arrived, sent from the publishers like a bag full of sugarplums and offering visions of grandeur and impossible riches. They promise nostalgic trips into the past: to simple country farms and cottages, to the stately drawing rooms of Louis XIV, and to the art-deco era of Paris salons. Some of the books also reflect a new lust to embrace the natural world, often achieved in the most unnatural of settings.
NEWS
June 4, 1991 | By Carlin Romano, Inquirer Book Critic
Daniel Quinn, a 55-year-old writer from Austin, Texas, has won the much publicized $500,000 Turner Tomorrow Award for his novel Ishmael, A Series of Philosophical Conversations between a man and - the title character - a great ape. Ted Turner, who established the international fiction contest 18 months ago, announced the award yesterday at the American Booksellers Association convention here and said Bantam Books would co-publish it with him...
NEWS
January 27, 1991 | By Al Haas, Inquirer Staff Writer
Bantam Books' travel-guide series began less than two years ago and quickly became one of the best in the business. Now, with equal rapidity, it is going out of business. Unhappy with the series' profits, Bantam has decided not to publish any new titles but will keep the 1991 guides already in print in the stores throughout the year. The company's last guides, Bantam's Florida 1991, Caribbean 1991, Soviet Union 1991 and Scotland 1991, were published in November and December. Bantam spokesman Stuart Applebaum said, "Despite Herculean efforts by the Bantam sales force and the editors here, the books just never really caught on with the consumers to the degree that we would have liked in a very crowded, competitive, brand-name-driven marketplace.
NEWS
January 2, 1991 | By Fawn Vrazo Compiled from reports from Inquirer wire services
DISPELLING A HEALTH SCARE After recent research linked the use of barrier contraceptives with hypertension (pre-eclampsia) during pregnancy, some gynecologists advised women not to use barrier birth control at all. Relax, says the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development. Its study involving more than 13,000 pregnant women found no association between this life-threatening condition and a woman's use of diaphragms, sponges, spermicides or condoms. COLDS AND CHILDREN Children under age 5 who stay at home can expect six to eight colds a year, while those in day care can expect to catch eight to 12. Add a few bouts of vomiting or diarrhea and a normal child may have an infection once a month or more, notes Woman's Day magazine.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 5, 1990 | By Richard Fuller, Special to The Inquirer
The paperback editions of his books used to appear in August, usually along with the latest hardback. Then an editor must have said, "Yo, Stevie! We should be coming out in October, the time of the pumpkin, Halloween!" Yes, faithful fans, give a big welcome to Stephen King, who could be held personally responsible for the fact that horror prose is threatening the shelf space of almost everything else, including knitting and potpourri manuals. In King's latest paperback, The Dark Half (Signet, $5.95)
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