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Bar Stools

NEWS
February 16, 2015 | By Kellie Patrick Gates, For The Inquirer
Hello there One night after work in October 2011, Jason, his buddy Chip, and another friend figured they'd grab a beer at Mike's York Street Bar & Grill in Warminster - Jason's hometown. They were enjoying their beers when two women approached their bar stools. Maggie, a student at Philadelphia College of Pharmacy, had been given an assignment by her introduction-to-communications professor: Invade a stranger's personal space. Write down what happens. Maggie and her friend Stefanie, who came with her for moral support, were looking for that stranger when Stefanie spotted her friend Chip.
NEWS
August 24, 2015 | By Kellie Patrick Gates, For The Inquirer
Hello there There she was again. Whenever Denine catered a Choral Arts Society event, a certain woman caught her eye. One spring night in 1999, Denine saw her at a reception at the Academy of Music, the flash of her movement from one group of important people to another momentarily distracting Denine from keeping up with the buffet. "There was an aura about her," Denine remembers. "I liked her looks, but it was more than that. It's like I was star struck. " She wanted to talk to her but didn't know how to make it happen.
NEWS
January 14, 1999 | by Patricia O'Haire, New York Daily News
He may easily be America's favorite barfly, so it seemed only natural to meet him across a bucket of suds in a local watering hole. George Wendt is his name, but to the millions of people who tuned in weekly for 11 years to watch "Cheers" on TV, he'll always be the salty beer-guzzler Norm Peterson. Sitting near the window of the small bar next to the Royale Theater, where he is appearing in the prize-winning play "Art," Wendt turns out not to drink suds at all. "Coke, mixed with club soda," he orders.
NEWS
November 12, 1990 | By Joe O'Dowd, Daily News Staff Writer
An argument over a bar stool in a Logan nightclub early today erupted into a shooting that left one man dead and two others wounded. Fifty patrons of the club - the Stinger Discotheque at Broad Street and Belfield Avenue - looked on in horror as one of the men in the argument pulled a handgun and began firing wildly shortly after 1 a.m. When police arrived minutes later, summoned by a telephone call from the bar, they found one of the shooting...
FOOD
March 14, 1999 | By Craig LaBan, INQUIRER FOOD WRITER
Christianity was hardly St. Patrick's only valuable contribution to the Emerald Isle. According to legend, the saint was the first Irish monk at the end of the Dark Ages to distill "the water of life. " Otherwise known as uisge beatha, the Gaelic phrase eventually became "whiskey" once Henry II's English soldiers invaded Ireland in the 1100s. The Irish may, indeed, have invented whiskey. But their pedigreed dark spirit has languished in the shadow of Scotch for most of this century.
BUSINESS
April 18, 2015 | By Linda Loyd, Inquirer Staff Writer
Hometown convenience retailer Wawa will open its first store featuring interior bar stools and a counter for dining at Broad and Walnut Streets this year. At a Wawa Day celebration Thursday, with Mayor Nutter on hand, the company announced plans for a 5,300- to 5,500-square-foot "flagship store" at the former Robinson's Luggage location at one of Center City's busiest intersections. Construction will begin next month and be completed by the end of the year, said spokeswoman Lori Bruce.
NEWS
July 26, 1994 | by Joanne Sills, Daily News Staff Writer
A year ago, residents of Cedarbrook celebrated the closing of the raucous Ivy Hill bar. The patrons of the nuisance bar packed guns and drugs, and trashed the streets with beer bottles and crack vials. When the bar closed, residents did what they hadn't done in years: Sat outdoors in the summer. On Sunday, a little more than a year after their victory, the community celebrated again with the dedication of the Brand New Life Christian Center. Greg Wicks, of Wadsworth Neighbors Against Drugs, said his group, a nightly town watch that had worked with neighbors and law enforcement to close down the Ivy Hill, welcomes the church.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 24, 1999 | By Julia M. Klein, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Burn Manhattan, the name of both the show and the group, wasn't exactly smoldering in its Fringe Festival debut Wednesday night. But, then again, it was struggling under a handicap: One actor, Jay Rhoderick, had to miss the show, leaving the other four to carry on, along with musical director Mark Levenson at the piano. Rhoderick was scheduled to return for remaining performances. Burn Manhattan has no script, just the inventiveness of these men in dark suits and skinny ties, who use a couple of bar stools as props.
NEWS
June 3, 2010 | By JULIE SHAW, shawj@phillynews.com 215-854-2592
Vincent Cervellero returned to his Tacony home one day in 2007 to find his two hot tubs, a yet-to-be-assembled gazebo, a grill, refrigerator, bar stools and other items taken from his yard. He later learned that members of the city's Community Life Improvement Program (CLIP), an anti-blight program, had taken his items without his permission. Cervellero, who filed a civil claim against the city, the Department of Licenses and Inspections and CLIP, was awarded a $7,000 settlement in the case earlier this year, his attorney, Coren J. Wise, said yesterday.
NEWS
July 12, 2015 | By Jim Rutter, For The Inquirer
F. Scott Fitzgerald may have said "there are no second acts in American lives," but Richard Maltby Jr. and David Shire didn't think so when they penned Closer Than Ever , a two-act sung-through revue about how life goes on long after halftime. The pair cultivated stories from their friends and, in 1989, wrote Closer Than Ever , which catches the aftermath of the first generation that followed the nationwide passage of no-fault divorce laws. Four actors (two men and two women)
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