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NEWS
November 9, 1998 | By Jennifer Farrell, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Tony Sacca's tumultuous football career has taken him from Delran to Barcelona and back again, with stops at Penn State and the NFL in between. Now the South Jersey native is looking to parlay his athletic achievements into a touchdown in the business arena with Sacca's Pourhouse Pub, a bar he is about to take over in Pennsauken. Sacca, along with two buddies, has signed a sales agreement on Lombardo's Tavern & Package Goods Store, at Cove Road and Westfield Avenue. An assistant football coach at La Salle University in Philadelphia, he is dividing his time between the gridiron and tackling the bar business.
NEWS
August 16, 1998 | By Carrie Budoff, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
The Cubby Hole, a coffeehouse on East Main Street, is true to its name. The dining area is no more than 200 square feet. It is big enough for two round tables, one by the bay window and the other about four feet away near the kitchen entrance, as well as for four bar stools along a counter that lines the wall opposite the door. "We tried to put in five bar stools," said Barbara Callaway, who owns and operates the Cubby Hole with her fiance, Jeff Baker. "But that was too much of a squeeze.
NEWS
May 19, 1998 | by Yvonne Latty, Daily News Staff Writer Staff writer Joe O'Dowd contributed to this report
Barbara Wallace spent most of Sunday night sipping brandy and enjoying the Motown sounds that blared from the jukebox at her West Philadelphia hangout. But with the yelling of three words, a relaxing night in a neighborhood bar turned into terror. "Hit the floor!" she heard someone cry as dozens of mostly middle-aged patrons dived from their bar stools. Then came the sound of rapid gunfire. "Shots were coming from all around," Wallace, 51, recalled yesterday. "I didn't know which way to crawl.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 18, 1995 | By Ellen O'Brien, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER This story contains information from the Associated Press
George Wendt and John Ratzenberger, a.k.a. Norm and Cliff of that famous Boston beer garden Cheers, have the go-ahead to sue Host International to keep a couple of robot look-alikes off bar stools in Host's airport bars. The bars are themed around Cheers' cozy patter, and the two actors say the pair of chitchatting, elbow-bending machines suspiciously resemble them. Host, which has a license to be Cheersy, says the robots don't really resemble the men, and just to prove it, Host christened the talking carpet- sweepers "Bob" and "Hank.
NEWS
November 16, 1994 | Daily News wire services
NEW YORK DOUBLE'S THE THING AT THIS RESTAURANT Make mine a double, please. That'll be no problem at Twins, a new bar and restaurant where even the most sober patron will be seeing double. Owners, bartenders, waiters, waitresses, busboys - they're all twins at Twins, which opens officially Friday on Manhattan's Upper East Side. "We decided to call it what we are," explained Lisa Ganz, who is launching the restaurant with her twin sister, Debbie. The 27-year-olds are identical, down to their waist-length auburn hair, their lipstick shade and the color of their manicured nails.
NEWS
June 7, 1991 | By Daniel Rubin, Inquirer Staff Writer
There's a jukebox now - a CD jukebox - stacked with Madonna, Roxette and the Stones. You can still chase a Calverts with a cold Bud, but they also carry Absolut Citron and something called Caffe Lolita. Lunch meat has given way to mozzarella sticks. The kitchen turns out Cajun fries. What has happened to The Church? Two weeks after the closing of the workingman's taproom in Juniata Park, chronicled in these pages, something completely different has opened in its stead.
NEWS
November 12, 1990 | By Joe O'Dowd, Daily News Staff Writer
An argument over a bar stool in a Logan nightclub early today erupted into a shooting that left one man dead and two others wounded. Fifty patrons of the club - the Stinger Discotheque at Broad Street and Belfield Avenue - looked on in horror as one of the men in the argument pulled a handgun and began firing wildly shortly after 1 a.m. When police arrived minutes later, summoned by a telephone call from the bar, they found one of the shooting...
NEWS
September 22, 1989 | By Paul Nussbaum, Inquirer Staff Writer
From their brief sojourn here, visiting Soviets may conclude that America's West is peopled with cowboys who wear Ralph Lauren, ride saddles that double as bar stools and paint a lot of pictures. Usually off-limits to Soviets, this spectacular mountain valley has unleashed its charms, both natural and designer-label, to impress the delegation accompanying Soviet Foreign Minister Eduard A. Shevardnadze for his meetings today and tomorrow with Secretary of State James A. Baker 3d. Local organizers had to scramble to find a red carpet to roll out at the airport last night, and it took international diplomacy to find Shevardnadze's hat size for his gift Stetson.
NEWS
September 4, 1987 | By LEWIS J. MOONEY
Cal Thomas wrote a fine column (Aug. 17) about a male going back to an old- fashioned barber shop. Oh, how I wish we males could return to an old- fashioned male bar! Back in the early '70s, Stouffers' Men's Bar was one of the most popular watering spots for male members of the legal profession, advertising world and business men who used Pennsylvania Railroad to diverse points like Ardmore, Lansdowne, Cynwyd, Levittown and spots along the Octoraro Branch. It was at the bottom of 2 Penn Center, on the level where dependable locals welcomed commuters and wended them to their neighborhoods.
NEWS
April 23, 1987 | By Jeff Brown, Inquirer Staff Writer
They arrived shortly before 10 a.m. yesterday - scores of casually dressed men and women with the hungry, anxious expressions of bargain-basement shoppers. They came to pick over the remains of what had been one of South Jersey's premier roadhouses, Cinelli's Country House Restaurant in Cherry Hill. "As my dad would say, it's the same crowd you get for a public hanging," said the auctioneer, Daniel F. Comly of Philadelphia. Off and on for 52 years, the rambling structure was expanded as the Cinelli family's business flourished.
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