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Barbara Bush

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NEWS
September 29, 1994 | Daily News Wire Services
Former first lady Barbara Bush reveals in her new book, "Barbara Bush: A Memoir" (Scribner's / $25), that she once asked the Smithsonian to remove some books she found offensive. During a tour of a 1992 show on first ladies at the National Museum of American History, Bush saw copies of Kitty Kelley's tell-all books, "Jackie, Oh!" and "Nancy Reagan" on display. "These were ugly books written by someone who did not know either woman, and both books were largely discredited," writes Bush.
NEWS
April 16, 1990 | By Mary Jane Fine, Inquirer Staff Writer
Barbara Bush - jokingly referred to as "a famous green-vegetable eater from Washington" - will be the University of Pennsylvania's commencement speaker May 14, marking the school's 250th anniversary year, it was announced yesterday. "Any college or university is always looking for the most prestigious speaker possible, to bring a meaningful message to the graduating seniors," Bill Epstein, assistant to Penn President Sheldon Hackney, said yesterday. He added that Hackney was pleased to have gotten someone "whose stature would be befitting" the anniversary.
NEWS
May 30, 1989 | By Michael Matza, Inquirer Staff Writer Contributing to this report were the Associated Press, the Washington Post and Reuters
Barbara Bush made her European debut as first lady during the weekend, a fast-paced two days that included culture and charity, an audience with Pope John Paul II and a swim. She arrived in Brussels, Belgium, on Sunday night for a quiet dinner with her husband before the frenzied NATO meetings began. Her schedule has her hopping through Friday, when Air Force One is scheduled to touch down in Kennebunkport, Maine. No shopping sprees are on the agenda - although Barbara Bush told her staff she hoped to sneak in a trip to Ferragamo, the exclusive Italian shoe retailer.
NEWS
May 22, 1990 | By W. Speers, Inquirer Staff Writer The Associated Press and the New York Daily News contributed to this report
Barbara Bush was overcome by severe depression 14 years ago but beat it in six months by losing herself in volunteer work, and it has never returned. "I would feel like crying a lot and I really painfully hurt," the first lady is quoted as saying in the May 28 issue of U.S. News and World Report. "And I would think bad thoughts. . . . It was not nice. " She added that the sickness came after a two-year stint in China by George Bush as U.S. liaison officer in Bejing, where the couple was together most of the time.
NEWS
February 24, 1989 | By W. Speers, Inquirer Staff Writer Contributing to this report were the Associated Press, United Press International and Reuters
In a sudden about-face, Barbara Bush announced yesterday that she would no longer comment on controversial issues such as gun control and abortion. In a recent interview, Bush said she was "absolutely" in favor of banning assault rifles, a stand in opposition to that of President Bush. But "she's not the one that makes policy," said Barbara Bush's press secretary, Anna Perez, in explaining the decision. ". . . She's not the President. She said, 'It's the President's opinion that people should be interested in.' " Perez added that her boss was also concerned that her talking about such issues shifted the spotlight from things she's interested in, such as illiteracy, AIDS and the homeless.
NEWS
April 6, 1989 | By W. Speers, Inquirer Staff Writer Contributing to this report were the Associated Press, United Press International, the New York Times, the New York Daily News and USA Today
Barbara Bush invoked the memory and lesson of Lisa Steinberg yesterday while urging Americans to take a personal stand against child abuse. During a media briefing in Washington for National Child Abuse Prevention Month, she said, "As a nation we all mourn precious little Lisa Steinberg in New York City. We must not allow ourselves to be blind. If we know of a problem, we should reach out to the parents and suggest they get help. If we know of a child who is abused, we must not be afraid to get involved, even if it means picking up a phone and calling the authorities.
NEWS
January 22, 1989 | By David Broder, Washington Post
The gush is on about Barbara Bush. The same journals that were enthralled by Nancy Reagan's chic for eight years are suddenly enchanted by Bush's crow's feet and comfortable stoutness. Time magazine, borrowing what is purportedly a family nickname, put her on its cover as "The Silver Fox," suggesting with wild inappropriateness that she is like a luxury fur. She will bring "a refreshing new style to the White House," Time promised its readers before the new mistress of the mansion ever set foot in the place.
NEWS
January 25, 1991 | By W. Speers, Inquirer Staff Writer The Associated Press and Reuters contributed to this report
In her first public comments since the start of the war, Barbara Bush cautioned parents Wednesday about letting their children watch TV war coverage by themselves. Warning that "it's very scary" to children, Bush said she had to calm down her grandchildren and explain that the conflict "wasn't in their back yard. Parents should monitor their children and just be sure they're understanding what they're seeing, so they're not getting terrible nightmares. " As for her own grandchildren, Bush said: "We just talked about . . . the things we were looking at. I didn't tell them more than they wanted to know.
NEWS
August 23, 1989 | By W. Speers, Inquirer Staff Writer The Associated Press and Reuters contributed to this report
It was a good-news-bad-news day for Barbara Bush yesterday after being examined for a nagging eye problem at Washington's Walter Reed Army Hospital. The good news from her physicians was that the most serious threat from her case of Graves Disease - a thyroid problem - has been brought under control. However, there has been no improvement in her eye condition, which causes tearing and double vision, and her medication has been changed. "Mrs. Bush will begin a daily treatment of prednisone, a form of cortisone," according to a statement issued by her office.
NEWS
April 18, 1990 | By W. Speers, Inquirer Staff Writer Contributing to this report were the Associated Press, Reuters, the Washington Post, the Boston Globe, the New York Daily News and USA Today
The White House has come to the defense of Barbara Bush, whose appearance at Wellesley College's June 1 commencement is being protested by 150 students complaining that she is known only through the accomplishments of her husband. "It seems to me that a truly educated person would be able to recognize achievement whether in a classroom or in or out of a marriage," said White House spokesman Marlin Fitzwater. "If they withdraw the invitation, they will miss the opportunity to meet one of the most extraordinarily independent and influential women of our time.
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NEWS
March 26, 2015 | By Thomas Fitzgerald, Inquirer Politics Writer
Former Florida Gov. Jeb Bush met with some of the region's top Republican donors in Philadelphia on Tuesday as he continued a national fund-raising blitz ahead of a likely 2016 presidential campaign. Bush had a luncheon fund-raiser for his political action committee with backers at the Union League in Center City, and two smaller meetings later in the day with potential supporters. "I'm certainly listening and learning about all the candidates at this stage of the game, but at the same time, I've been a fan of Jeb Bush for a long time," said William R. Sasso, chairman of the law firm Stradley Ronon, who has worked with the former governor on the board of the National Constitution Center.
NEWS
January 8, 2015 | BY JOHN M. CRISP
Here's an idea that periodically develops traction across the political spectrum, even though it's not particularly likely to be implemented: A one-year, non-mandatory national-service program for Americans ages 18-28. One focus for this notion is the Franklin Project, which grew out of discussions at the Aspen Institute in the summer of 2013. The Project believes that America is "suffering from a deficit of citizenship and a general lack of connectedness. " Its solution is a program that provides opportunities for young people to perform one year of full-time service that addresses community needs - "education, poverty alleviation, food security" - in exchange for a modest stipend, scholarships or help with student debt.
NEWS
April 26, 2013 | By Peter Mucha, Philly.com
George W. Bush, president turned artist, wants his younger brother, Jeb, to run for the Oval Office. Their mother, Barbara, though, doesn't like the idea. "He doesn't need my counsel because he knows what it is, which is: "Run!" the ex-president told ABC's Diane Sawyer on the eve of the opening of his presidential library in Texas. "He would be great," said Bush, sitting next to wife Laura. "He would be a marvelous candidate. " Bush told CNN's John King the same thing, adding, "I don't know what he's going to do. " This morning on the Today show, however, Barbara Bush told cohost Matt Lauer: "We've had enough Bushes.
NEWS
July 18, 2012 | Associated Press
HOUSTON - A spokesman says former President George H.W. Bush and his wife, former first lady Barbara Bush, will not attend the Republican National Convention next month in Tampa, Fla., because of health reasons. The spokesman, Jim McGrath, says it will be the first time since 1976, when Bush was director of the CIA and refrained from partisan activities, that he won't attend the Republican Party gathering. Bush, 88, has a form of Parkinson's disease that afflicts his legs. He now gets around using a wheelchair or motorized scooter.
NEWS
May 31, 2012 | By Ben Feller, Associated Press
WASHINGTON - This is a little awkward. President Obama can't seem to stop bad-mouthing the record of former President George W. Bush. But on Thursday, Obama is going to welcome his predecessor and proudly preside as Bush's image and legacy are enshrined at the White House forever. Obama and first lady Michelle Obama will join Bush and his wife, Laura, as their official portraits are unveiled. The incumbent is keeping up a presidential tradition typically defined by cheer and graciousness, but not without some uneasiness.
NEWS
May 17, 2012 | Associated Press
WASHINGTON - George W. Bush said Tuesday that he's backing presumptive Republican White House nominee Mitt Romney. The former president offered a four-word endorsement of Romney as the doors of his elevator were closing after a speech in Washington. Bush said: "I'm for Mitt Romney. " ABC News caught Bush after the speech, prompting his unscripted - but not surprising - endorsement. Bush's parents, former President George H.W. Bush and Barbara Bush, endorsed Romney in March during an appearance in Texas.
NEWS
April 1, 2012 | By Steve Peoples, Associated Press
HOUSTON - George W. Bush is as hard to find in his father's office as he is in the 2012 presidential contest. The 43d president appears in a gold-framed picture tucked into a far corner of the room, partially hidden by a Texas flag and a cabinet door. The placement, whether intentional or not, is a reminder of the Republican presidential campaign and the lengths to which former Massachusets Gov. Mitt Romney and his rivals have tried to marginalize the two-term president. The younger Bush was an afterthought Thursday as his father, former President George H.W. Bush, met with Romney - until a reporter raised the issue.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 2, 2011 | By Tirdad Derakhshani, Inquirer Staff Writer
What's left to say about Kim Kardashian and Kris Humphries ? They stole our hearts, pushed consumer products in our face, and made off with more than $18 million in media contracts and freebies for their narcissistic $10 mil wedding. The 72-day marriage now kaput, Kim is in Australia promoting her new handbag line. Kris is licking his wounds in Minnesota. He was blindsided. "I love my wife and am devastated to learn she filed for divorce," he says in a statement.
LIVING
January 1, 2009 | FROM INQUIRER WIRE SERVICES
The majority of American women want the first lady to be a visible leader on issues that are important to her, according to a YMCA USA survey, and relatively few favor a traditional wife in the White House. Even fewer - 18 percent - want a first lady who is a political partner of the president, involved in government policy and decision-making. The report - "What Women Want: A National Survey of Priorities and Concerns" - was based on a poll of 1,000 women ages 18 to 70 conducted Oct. 28 to Nov. 2 by Princeton Survey Research Associates International.
NEWS
October 26, 2004 | By Jeff Shields INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
There would be no talking, no nastiness, and no fooling around. The First Mother was in town. She couldn't stay long, and she had a message for Pennsylvanians: George W. Bush needs you. "It's going to be a rough-and-tumble next eight days," former first lady Barbara Bush told an enthusiastic audience at Montgomery County Community College in Blue Bell yesterday. "There will be times you get tired and discouraged. . . . Just keep in mind what's at stake in this election. " Running late for an event in Ohio, Bush, 79, spoke for just 13 minutes.
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