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Barbecue Sauce

FOOD
December 28, 2012 | By Michael Klein, Philly.com
Food marketers can toil in the trenches for years before cinching the kind of deal that basically fell into Rich Landau and Kate Jacoby's laps. The food/housewares giant Williams-Sonoma has three sauces branded with the name Vedge, the couple's upscale vegan restaurant in Center City. They are to go on sale this week ($14.95) at more than 150 stores in the United States and the Middle East, and starting Jan. 17 on its website. The arrangement began simply. In the spring, a Williams-Sonoma executive visiting Philadelphia had a good meal at Vedge and called, said Shannon Gomes, a Williams-Sonoma spokeswoman.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 9, 1998 | By Gerald Etter, INQUIRER FOOD EDITOR
Even before you're seated at Rib-It, on Grant Avenue and Roosevelt Boulevard, the smoky aroma of barbecue begins tantalizing the senses, while the sound of many mouths gnawing on ribs plays like harmony to lively chatter. This is one of several Rib-Its, which, like the others - Cherry Hill, Turnersville, Media and Camp Hill - is owned by U.S. Restaurants, a Blue Bell-based business that operates a number of food franchises, including some Burger Kings. And like the others, it's a place for rolled-up sleeves, where fingers become acceptable dining tools and often work better than the knives and forks that come wrapped in thick paper napkins.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 23, 2011
BARBECUE PENNE PASTA 1 pound mini penne 2 tablespoons plus 2 teaspoons unsalted butter 1 tablespoon olive oil 2 cups diced onions 4 to 6 cups shredded, store-bought rotisserie chicken (one 3-pound chicken or two 1 1/2-pound chickens) 1 quart hickory-smoke-flavored barbecue sauce 12 slices bacon, cooked until crispy and crumbled 1/2 cup chopped scallions, white and green parts 1 1/2 cups shredded mozzarella cheese 2 cups shredded sharp cheddar cheese In a medium saucepan, cook the pasta according to the package directions until al dente.
NEWS
October 21, 1995 | by Leon Taylor, Daily News Staff Writer
The secret of Lazarus Fuller's melt-in-your-mouth barbecued ribs was the sauce. "My father never believed in buying barbecue sauce," said Linda B. Watson. "He made it himself. "Right now, I have several bottles of his barbecue sauce in the cabinets. I'm going to keep them. " Fuller, a former shipyard welder and Social Security employee, died in his West Philadelphia home on Monday. He was 71. Fuller was born to Lazarus and Linnie Lee Isler-Fuller in 1924 in Kinston, N.C. He attended public school there and was baptized at the St. Augustus AME Zion Church.
FOOD
May 24, 2000 | by Peggy Landers, Daily News Food Editor
Memorial Day Weekend is the official opening of grill season. That black box on wheels may have been sitting on the deck all winter, alone and all but forgotten, but now it beckons. And oh how it promises. . .to free you from the kitchen, to bring you outdoors, to ease you into casual entertaining, to make eating at home fun again. You say you're no grill wizard? Relax. You don't have to be as long as you know a few of what Ron Washington calls "tricks of the trade. " Washington has owned Ron's Ribs, 1627 South St., for 18 years and bottles and sells his own secret barbecue sauce ("Everyone's a barbecue expert when they put Ron's Ribs sauce on," he jokes)
ENTERTAINMENT
April 18, 1997 | By Gerald Etter, INQUIRER FOOD EDITOR
If you're looking for some good barbecue sauce for your cookouts, Fat Jack's BBQ & Blues, on Route 73 in Berlin, has some super fine stuff. Hot or mild, it has good body and excellent balance of flavors. And while you're there, you might as well have something to eat, as Fat Jack's actually is a restaurant. The barbecue sauce is something it simply packages on the side, so when you go home and have your own barbecue, you'll remember Fat Jack's. This hot spot is a spinoff of the Fat Jack's in Vineland, with Jeff Denbo of Cherry Hill the operating partner.
NEWS
July 24, 2008
IN LIFE, people always want to keep up with the Joneses. But not James Jones, who allegedly stabbed his dog to death with a 30-inch samurai sword (July 16). The mere mental image is enough to give a child nightmares for years. I realize that this will be labeled nothing more than animal cruelty, and will draw a fine and perhaps some jail time. Funny, but I thought the definition of murder was when you killed something. If it were a child he did this to, he'd be looking at the needle.
NEWS
October 31, 2012 | By Bonnie S. Benwick, Washington Post
If you've been without power at home, you'll soon be making decisions about what to pitch from your refrigerator and freezer. Here are some tips: A fully packed, free-standing freezer that has remained closed will stay at acceptably cold temperatures for two to four days. The following partially defrosted foods may be safe to eat/refreeze if they still contain ice crystals or have been kept below 40 degrees: beef, veal, lamb, pork, ground meat, casseroles, soups and stews, hard cheeses, juices, flours, nuts, packaged waffles and pancakes, frozen meals/convenience foods.
FOOD
August 14, 2015 | Samantha Melamed
Local hot sauce goes national Yong Chi, owner of Giwa, the Korean fast-casual favorite, is going national with his Yong's Korean Hot Sauce, a variation on the traditional bibimbap topper, made with red pepper, sesame oil, vinegar, and tamari. "A lot of hot sauce only brings heat. This is tangy, spicy and sweet. 'Deliciously Spicy' is our tagline," he said. It is selling at Whole Foods across the Mid-Atlantic and in more than 100 Kroger stores, and there are plans to roll out a Korean barbecue sauce in September.
FOOD
September 11, 1991 | By Ethel G. Hofman, Special to The Inquirer
The burger gourmet insists that there can be no comparison between a patty made of ground turkey and one of ground beef. I tend to agree. Even with exotic sauces and seasonings, a turkey burger is tight-textured and on the dry side, while the beef burger is succulent and juicy, without ketchup and just a pinch of salt and pepper. What's a fat- and cholesterol-conscious burger lover to do? Consider a combination of ground poultry and beef. An acceptable ratio for taste as well as content is two parts poultry and one part lean ground beef.
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