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Barbecue Sauce

NEWS
February 14, 1999 | By Scott Fallon, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
MMMMMmmmmm! Gotta love that barbecue! Local artist Bill Levers does. A painting he made of a stoic Indian chief will appear on the label of thousands of jars of "Old Dakota Barbecue Sauce," a product from Britain set to hit grocery store shelves in Europe and Australia by April. Not only will his painting be on the jar, but so will his name and endorsement of the product: "BAR-B-Q Sauce Suggested By Bill Levers, Western Artist. " Now, Levers may not technically be a "Western Artist," - he grew up in Southwest Philadelphia and has lived for 22 years in Washington Township, but he has taken plenty of vacations in the Dakotas and has taken hundreds of photographs of Western landscapes, which he plans to eventually reproduce in paintings.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 9, 1998 | By Gerald Etter, INQUIRER FOOD EDITOR
Even before you're seated at Rib-It, on Grant Avenue and Roosevelt Boulevard, the smoky aroma of barbecue begins tantalizing the senses, while the sound of many mouths gnawing on ribs plays like harmony to lively chatter. This is one of several Rib-Its, which, like the others - Cherry Hill, Turnersville, Media and Camp Hill - is owned by U.S. Restaurants, a Blue Bell-based business that operates a number of food franchises, including some Burger Kings. And like the others, it's a place for rolled-up sleeves, where fingers become acceptable dining tools and often work better than the knives and forks that come wrapped in thick paper napkins.
BUSINESS
April 12, 1998 | By Bob Fernandez, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Pickles may not be glamorous, but they're what Bob Bernstock has to work with. "We will start with the humble cucumber and only when the cucumber has reached its full potential will we even look at other possibilities," he says with aplomb. Bernstock, a former Campbell Soup top executive, has a new assignment. He's running Vlasic Foods International Inc., a good-sized food company spun off by Campbell Soup in late March. In addition to Vlasic pickles, the nation's best-selling brand, and popular Swanson frozen dinners, the company contains this mish-mash of less attractive businesses: a Midwest barbecue sauce called Open Pit, an Argentina beef processor, a German gourmet food distributor, and a network of high-cost mushroom farms.
FOOD
April 30, 1997 | by Aliza Green, For the Daily News
Yo, Chefs! I am a crab lover: hardshell, softshell, no shell, male, female. I have made several dishes with crab and would like to try more. Can you help me find one? Marcia Sheppard Philadelphia Dear Marcia, Here's a wonderful recipe for grilled softshell crabs in a sage barbecue sauce, from chef Zachary Conover of Philadelphia Fish & Co. He serves the dish in great quantities during softshell season. Do not be afraid of cleaning softshell crabs. It is actually very easy.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 18, 1997 | By Gerald Etter, INQUIRER FOOD EDITOR
If you're looking for some good barbecue sauce for your cookouts, Fat Jack's BBQ & Blues, on Route 73 in Berlin, has some super fine stuff. Hot or mild, it has good body and excellent balance of flavors. And while you're there, you might as well have something to eat, as Fat Jack's actually is a restaurant. The barbecue sauce is something it simply packages on the side, so when you go home and have your own barbecue, you'll remember Fat Jack's. This hot spot is a spinoff of the Fat Jack's in Vineland, with Jeff Denbo of Cherry Hill the operating partner.
NEWS
October 21, 1995 | by Leon Taylor, Daily News Staff Writer
The secret of Lazarus Fuller's melt-in-your-mouth barbecued ribs was the sauce. "My father never believed in buying barbecue sauce," said Linda B. Watson. "He made it himself. "Right now, I have several bottles of his barbecue sauce in the cabinets. I'm going to keep them. " Fuller, a former shipyard welder and Social Security employee, died in his West Philadelphia home on Monday. He was 71. Fuller was born to Lazarus and Linnie Lee Isler-Fuller in 1924 in Kinston, N.C. He attended public school there and was baptized at the St. Augustus AME Zion Church.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 11, 1995 | By Gerald Etter, INQUIRER FOOD WRITER
There is a new theme restaurant in town, and while it's not a Hard Rock Cafe or a Planet Hollywood with high-profile investors, its developers see it as the prototype of what they envision as a very successful chain. It's called Heritage, and its concept is African American culture. The main investment group is a London outfit called Karibu International, but there are local partners in the Philadelphia venture. Heritage, open four weeks, is at Broad and Chestnut, in the former Western Savings Bank building - complete with a 30-year-old bullet hole in the window fronting Broad Street.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 14, 1995 | By Gerald Etter, INQUIRER FOOD WRITER
When Isaac Linietsky talks about his confidence in operating a successful kosher restaurant, it sounds as if either Sholom Aleichem or Jackie Mason scripted his lines. "Look," he says, "I was very aware that the kosher dining business doesn't have a real great success rate. I've seen them come and go. But one thing I have that the others didn't have is that I am the owner and chef. "Most of the others had to get a chef. And while the chef might have been an excellent one, he and the owner would have a falling out, and it would be difficult finding another.
NEWS
May 23, 1994 | Daily News Wire Services
"Sometimes we have to suffer to get the best of life's lessons. " - Kathleen Sullivan, former "CBS This Morning" co-anchor, who lost 18 pounds on Weight Watchers, and will be piloting "After the Headlines" for NBC. FERGIE EYES ROYAL FILM ROLE "Fergie," the red-haired estranged wife of the duke of York, is said to be considering a film role as Boadicea - the first-century queen who resisted the Roman occupation of Britain. The Sunday Times in London reported that the duchess of York, formerly Sarah Ferguson, was looking at a script for film-maker Ken Russell, in which Boadicea is flogged naked and her women warriors marched into battle clad in just paint.
FOOD
December 12, 1993 | By Elaine Tait, INQUIRER RESTAURANT CRITIC
Not all that many years ago, a restaurant specializing in roast chicken might exist, but its location would be a busy highway and the decor pure truck stop. Roasters makes it perfectly clear that it is not that sort of restaurant. The address is an easy stroll north from Rittenhouse Square and its affluent neighbors, and the place itself is as warm and homey - pretty, even - as a country kitchen. Rough-textured white walls, tile floors and banquettes upholstered in cheerful provincial print are the basics.
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