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NEWS
March 27, 1987 | By NELS NELSON, Daily News Theater Critic
William Shakespeare never set foot on the Jersey shore in his lifetime. Better late than never. The Bard finally is coming to Cape May next weekend, and - would you believe it? - no one is rushing to mine the beaches. "Shakespeare in Cape May: A Discovery Weekend," April 3-5, a program of the Mid-Atlantic Center for the Arts, will combine lectures by Shakespeare scholars, a performance workshop by professional actors, a showing of Franco Zeffirelli's "Romeo and Juliet," a discussion of operas based on the Bard (with musical examples)
NEWS
April 9, 2009 | By Howard Shapiro INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Yes, something is rotten in the state of Denmark, but something is also remarkable: Lantern Theater's electrifying production of Hamlet, which opened Tuesday night on a sparse Center City stage that could not seem fuller, and with a cast that could not be finer. William Shakespeare wrote his tragedy almost 410 years ago, but given this smooth, dynamic staging by Lantern's artistic director, Charles McMahon, and this facile interpretation, the Bard could have spun off his longest play while taking a break from bangers and mash just this year.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 24, 1987 | By GENE SEYMOUR, Daily News Staff Writer
Shakespeare's on television again tonight. You know what that means. Yea, verily. Time once again to root around the cranial attic for some wistful memories of when you and the Bard used to hang out together around the high school water fountain or student union quadrangle. You feel the need to yank down your dusty collection of Shakespeare's folios and bring your loved ones around the living room campfire for some pre-telecast orientation in these timeless classics. Better realign your reflexes, folksies.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 10, 1989 | By Nels Nelson, Daily News Theater Critic
How would Shakespeare have coped with a Broadway production of one of his earlier comedies during his own lifetime? British playwright Alan Ayckbourn, at 50 already gone by Shakespeare in terms of total output - 37 plays produced to the Bard's 36 ("But will they last 400 years?" he poses cheerily) - lists among the occasional disappointments in his illustrious career his 1971 Broadway debut with the comedy "How the Other Half Loves. " "It was a case of the New York Times smiling with only half its face," he breezes via telephone from Yorkshire, England.
NEWS
July 27, 2012 | By Howard Shapiro, Inquirer Staff Writer
'Lord, what fools these mortals be!" Shakespeare writes in A Midsummer Night's Dream , and given how he operated in the theater of his day, he could have been referring to the way plays are done today. A costume designer!? Whoever heard of such a thing? Someone to plan . . . what is that word . . . lighting ? Preposterous! And what is this director? Another foolish piece of nonsense, methinks. The theater now has plenty of, as producers say, "creative-team members," but even the idea of a director would have been foreign before the 19th century.
NEWS
May 22, 2007 | By Wendy Rosenfield FOR THE INQUIRER
There are few theatrical experiences more transformative than a first encounter with Shakespeare. His portrayal of the human soul in every guise, 400 years on, remains vital and magical. He has birthed generations of theater lovers, and despite the many distractions invented for potential audiences in the years since the Globe Theater's first opening night, he still manages to fill houses across the actual globe. Of course, transformations can go the other way too, and there may be no more scarring dramatic experience than sitting through a long night of bad Shakespeare.
NEWS
February 25, 2004 | By Chris Gray INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
State Rep. Ellen Bard, who is vying for the GOP nomination in the contentious 13th Congressional District race, says that she has always been pro-First Amendment, pro-freedom of the press. But in a memo written to House members on Jan. 26, Bard said that she planned to introduce legislation placing restrictions on the Pennsylvania Shield Law that would require reporters to disclose their sources if they were sued for defamation or invasion of privacy. Bard also said that she would change the Shield Law to create a "presumption" of damages in defamation cases, which would allow plaintiffs to receive financial awards without proving that they had suffered harm.
NEWS
March 18, 2008 | By Howard Shapiro INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
When Romeo (we're talking the real Romeo - balcony, Verona, love-lamed and all) says his spirit "lifts me above the ground with cheerful thoughts," does he really need to leap as he says the words lifts me? And what about Juliet's dad? Sure, he's exasperated because his daughter refuses to accept the marriage he's arranged to the noble but passionless Paris - wouldn't you be, if you'd gone to all that trouble? She'd better be in church for the nuptials, he commands, as Juliet sobs at his feet, or "I will drag thee on a hurdle thither.
NEWS
February 12, 2012 | By Steven Rea, Inquirer Columnist
Ralph Fiennes ' Coriolanus is not your typical toga-and-sandals Shakespeare. It's camouflage-and-combat boots Shakespeare, it's gritty, it's graffitied. Although the actor and first-time director is faithful to the Bard's text, setting his tale of usurpation and political upheaval in the city-state of Rome, it looks more like Bosnia, or Beirut. Slabs of grim modernist architecture, the rubble and debris of poverty and conflict, TV monitors reporting news of rioting and war - Fiennes' Coriolanus , with its people's uprisings and its uniformed demagogues, its partisan clashes and elitist arrogance, is about as contemporary as it gets.
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NEWS
April 30, 2015
ISSUE | ENGLISH STUDIES Be the Bard I couldn't disagree more with my good friend professor Nora Johnson at Swarthmore about not requiring college English majors to take a course devoted to Shakespeare and his works ("A lack of Will: Bard rarely required on campus," April 24). As chair of La Salle University's English department, and as someone trained as a medievalist but who writes on television and film, I am hardly a hidebound defender of the canon. Begrudgingly, at La Salle, we do not require courses in Chaucer, Milton, and others, but we do in Shakespeare - because there is no match in terms of historical and global importance and influence.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 2, 2014 | By Jim Rutter, For The Inquirer
Go big or go home. This line of thinking dominates Henry IV: Your Prince and Mine , this summer's free outdoor production by Shakespeare in Clark Park and Team Sunshine Performance Corporation. For starters, Henry IV: YPM boasts several of Philly's top professionals in a standout cast of 12, with little doubling of roles. Local musical virtuoso Alex Bechtel leads a choir of eight and composed sterling thematic music that emotionally underscores many of the intrigue- and familial-driven scenes.
NEWS
February 21, 2014
WE'RE pretty sure your local pharmacy doesn't carry a card for a 450th birthday, but that doesn't mean you can't help William Shakespeare celebrate that milestone this year. Last month, the Free Library of Philadelphia began a major, yearlong observance of the Bard of Avon that will feature a multidimensional series of programs. Not surprisingly, at the center of the celebration is Ol' Will's theatrical legacy. "Ninety percent of the programs are related to his plays," said Sandy Horrocks, the library's vice president of external affairs.
NEWS
February 17, 2014 | BY REGINA MEDINA, Daily News Staff Writer medinar@phillynews.com, 215-854-5985
EDISON HIGH SCHOOL senior Kiara Gil-Jimenez had no problem performing a scene from "Romeo and Juliet" in English class - despite the tricky dialogue spoken by Lord Capulet when he learns that his daughter doesn't want to marry Paris. "Thank me no thankings nor proud me no prouds, "But fettle your fine joints 'gainst Thursday next," Gil-Jimenez recited from the play during a recent class. Gil-Jimenez and her senior classmates are taking part in the "Romeo and Juliet Project," a 12-day residency hosted by Philadelphia Young Playwrights and the Philadelphia Shakespeare Theatre.
NEWS
January 10, 2014 | By Stephan Salisbury, Inquirer Staff Writer
Yes, all the world's a stage, as Shakespeare noted in As You Like It, so it should be no surprise that all the men and women gathered Wednesday at the Free Library on Logan Circle were merely players. There was Will himself (also known as Brian McCann), acting no improbable fiction, but rather introducing an ambitious, year-long schedule of programs and events planned in honor of the bard's 450th birthday. "The Year of the Bard: Shakespeare at 450" has been put together by the library, the Philadelphia Shakespeare Theatre, and other cultural organizations around the region.
NEWS
August 16, 2013 | BY STEPHANIE FARR, Daily News Staff Writer farrs@phillynews.com, 215-854-4225
NEAL McLAURIN remembers taking the 33 bus to the movies as a kid with his parents and seeing a man living on the street, thick with layers of clothing. He couldn't understand it. Less than two decades later, he understood all too well. McLaurin was in his 20s and homeless, sleeping at Broad and Arch streets in 2007, when a mother and her child walked by. The way the little boy looked at McLaurin is the way he had looked at the homeless man as a kid. The way the mother grabbed her son is the way his mother had grabbed him. "So, I was that man that I'd seen all those years ago and it hit me," McLaurin said.
NEWS
July 26, 2013 | By Wendy Rosenfield, For The Inquirer
If ever there was a production that illustrated just how problematic Shakespeare's "problem plays" can be, it's the Pennsylvania Shakespeare Festival's Measure for Measure , directed by Fontaine Syer. Syer sets the action in the Vienna of 1900, a city at the top of its cultural game, blossoming as a center of art and design, particularly art nouveau, but also in the year seeing the publication of Freud's The Interpretation of Dreams . Marla Jurglanis' costumes don't reflect art nouveau's flowing, sensuous curves, but that's not what the play's about anyway.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 15, 2013 | By Tirdad Derakhshani, Inquirer Staff Writer
How do you go from Buffy the Vampire Slayer , Firefly , and the 2012 blockbuster The Avengers to Shakespeare ? Enthusiastically, says Joss Whedon , god of all sci-fi geeks. The Bard is the greatest teacher one could have, Whedon tells USA Today. "He speaks to you very personally," says the director of the critical hit Much Ado About Nothing , which stars Amy Acker , Alexis Denisof , and Nathan Fillion . "He says take the things you understand - the stories, the tropes, the characters - and look further.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 2, 2013 | By Howard Gensler
IT'S TAKEN a little more than 500 years to get to the root of William Shakespeare 's personality, but it turns out he was a bastard. According to a group of academics, the Bard was more Shylock than Puck, a ruthless businessman - hoarder, moneylender, tax dodger - who grew wealthy dealing in grain during a time of famine. You thought he just wrote plays, but researchers from Aberystwyth University, in Wales, argue that we can't fully understand Shakespeare unless we study his often-overlooked business savvy.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 28, 2012 | By Wendy Rosenfield, For The Inquirer
The television show Game of Thrones has nothing on William Shakespeare's own game of thrones, King John . As if there weren't excitement enough in watching Europe's monarchs and royal mothers jockey for power while the Vatican pulls their strings, the Pennsylvania Shakespeare Festival ups the ante with a production based on the play's "original practice. " This means the company went about the show the way it's presumed its original performers would have. PSF handed its performers a script crisply edited by Patrick Mulcahy and Erin Hurley, gave them four days of rehearsal, told them to find their own costumes, figure out the lighting, make do with whatever set happened to be available (its craggy cliffs belong to The Tempest )
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