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Bargain Hunters

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NEWS
September 10, 1998 | By Mary Anne Janco, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Bargain hunters will have two opportunities to seek new treasures - first at the Super Sunday flea market this weekend and then at the Great Media Garage Day Sale Sept. 19. State Street will be lined with craft booths and flea-market tables from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Sunday. About 200 vendors have signed up to sell an assortment of goods. Entertainment and a variety of edibles will complete Sunday's festivities. Proceeds will benefit the Ed Berman Scholarship Fund at Pennsylvania State University's Delaware County campus.
NEWS
March 23, 1992 | By Kimberly J. McLarin, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Duncan Moore was not leaving without his highboy. He arrived at the furniture sale at the defunct Radisson Suite Hotel on the Parkway yesterday afternoon to find crowds, confusion and cold weather. The line of people waiting to get inside the hotel wrapped around the building. After a while, snow began falling with a purpose. But Moore, of Chester, had his own mission. He had seen the highboy advertised somewhere else for $599 on sale. Inside the crowded building, they were offering them for $475.
BUSINESS
May 1, 1997 | The Philadelphia Inquirer
Investors were encouraged by good news about inflation. Bargain hunters sought out technology stocks and other sectors that have lagged.
BUSINESS
March 4, 1999 | The Philadelphia Inquirer
Blue chips finished down, but bargain hunters pushed tech shares higher in the last hour. Two more strong economic reports heightened fears that the Fed might raise interest rates.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 29, 1986 | By ROBYN SCHAUFFELE SELVIN, Daily News Sales Columnist
With the holidays coming up, bargain hunters should be stashing away discounted eveningwear for parties and at-home entertaining. One source for such glad rags is The Braudes, a cozy little shop in the Northeast. This store's regular stock consists of dress-up merchandise that the owner says is discounted 20 percent or more from suggested retail. But the real draw for bargain hunters is the one-of-a-kind manufacturer and model samples. The owner says those items comprise about 20 percent of his stock and will save shoppers from 25 to 50 percent.
BUSINESS
January 31, 1997 | by Rose DeWolf, Daily News Staff Writer
The Strawbridge's at 13th and Market - the one that used to be Wanamaker's - hasn't looked the way it did yesterday since the building was built in 1904. Bare shelves and bare racks on every floor. Some departments completely empty. Bargain hunters, lured by 60 percent discounts, were also on every floor, picking over the remaining merchandise. The scene is only temporary. It will continue until the store closes its doors at 8 p.m. tomorrow. The store will reopen again in late summer or early fall as a Lord & Taylor with new merchandise.
SPORTS
November 21, 2012 | BY PETER MUCHA, Philly.com
CHEEP! Cheep! Why, it's Eagles tickets begging for someone to buy them. With the injury-riddled team foundering at 3-7, and many fans calling for an end to the Andy Reid era, many tickets are selling below half of face value on StubHub. "Given the economy and the time of the year, it's as tough as I've seen it since Rich Kotite," said Jeremi Conaway, vice president of Wanamaker Tickets in Center City. And he's been selling tickets for a decade-and-a-half - since a couple of years after Jeffrey Lurie bought the team.
NEWS
August 20, 1987 | By John Ellis, Special to The Inquirer
Larry Factor, owner of Champion Gym in Colmar, picked up five fire extinguishers for $15. Ashwin Patel of Warminster, who is planning to start a small business, bought several greeting card racks for $10 apiece. And Joseph Clements, owner of Associated Auctioneers in East Lansdowne, bought an air conditioner that he said would "retail for $200 to $300" for $17. The three entreprenuers were among about 60 bargain hunters who showed up at the old Sears, Roebuck & Co. store at 1495 Old York Rd. in Abington Tuesday and Wednesday for a spirited auction of the store's inventory - everything from racks to office equipment to mannequins to pallet jacks.
NEWS
December 22, 1997 | by Theresa Conroy, Daily News Staff Writer
There's a completely different view from the other side of the cash register. It's not a very lofty perspective - the little silver-haired head of this department-store sales associate barely reaches 5 feet in height. But when you've been peeking over a Strawbridge's register for 35 years, height has nothing to do with it. After all that time, this little lady knows what it's like to wait on the nasty and the nice. "Some people get impatient," she said. "After all, when you get the crowd like we had here yesterday . . . " Thursday, Strawbridge's had a coupon sale - 20 percent off sale items.
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SPORTS
November 21, 2012 | BY PETER MUCHA, Philly.com
CHEEP! Cheep! Why, it's Eagles tickets begging for someone to buy them. With the injury-riddled team foundering at 3-7, and many fans calling for an end to the Andy Reid era, many tickets are selling below half of face value on StubHub. "Given the economy and the time of the year, it's as tough as I've seen it since Rich Kotite," said Jeremi Conaway, vice president of Wanamaker Tickets in Center City. And he's been selling tickets for a decade-and-a-half - since a couple of years after Jeffrey Lurie bought the team.
BUSINESS
August 24, 2011 | By Matthew Craft, Associated Press
NEW YORK - Stocks on Tuesday posted their biggest jump in nearly two weeks as investors bought shares that were cheaply priced after the market's pounding during the last month. The Dow Jones industrials ended with a gain of 322 points. While the average dipped about 60 points shortly after an earthquake hit the East Coast at 1:51 p.m., stocks recovered within 20 minutes and soared even higher later in the afternoon. James Paulsen, chief investment strategist at Wells Capital Management, said the beating that stocks had taken since late July made it look as if investors were preparing for a recession.
NEWS
November 27, 2010 | By JAN RANSOM, ransomj@phillynews.com 215-854-5218
LIFE has been tough for struggling single parent Bridget Kenny, but this year she's determined to make the holiday season a memorable one for her 10-month-old son. The job of making that happen started yesterday as Kenny, 27, joined the thousands of bargain hunters who muscled through crowds on Black Friday, the traditional start to the holiday-shopping season. "It's so hard, I can barely make it," Kenny said as she pushed her bright-eyed son, Travis James Stone Jr., in a Kmart shopping cart at the Gallery while looking at aisles of toys.
NEWS
December 4, 2008 | MICHAEL SMERCONISH
THE ONLY thing that could've awakened me from a tryptophan-induced slumber last weekend was what happened after the doors opened at a Wal-Mart on Long Island, N.Y. And I don't mean the trampling of Jdimytai Damour. I refer to the subsequent coverage of Damour's tragic death. Everywhere I turned, I kept hearing it was a sign of the foundering economy. Take, for example, the New York Times account. The lead: "In a sign of consumer desperation amid a bleak economy, the annual rite of retailing known as Black Friday turned chaotic and even deadly, as predawn shoppers scrambled for holiday bargains.
NEWS
November 25, 2006 | By Edward Colimore, Lini Kadaba and Madhusmita Bora INQUIRER STAFF WRITERS
Many of the first shoppers began camping out at Philadelphia-area stores by midafternoon on Thanksgiving Day - soon after gobbling down a turkey lunch. With tents, blankets, folding chairs and umbrellas, they braved a cold, windblown rain during the evening, then fought their way through the crowds when the doors opened on Black Friday. The trend was similar in malls and shopping centers nationwide. "It was a much bigger retail day than what we thought," said Britt Beemer, chairman of America's Research Group, a South Carolina consumer research and marketing firm.
NEWS
June 12, 2004 | By Kellie Patrick INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The price of gas at a Langhorne Exxon station is cheap enough to turn heads - and steering wheels. While the average price of gas in the five-county Philadelphia region was $2.13 this week, the uncle-and-nephew team of Alex and Dincer Soy charged $1.979 per gallon yesterday. The Soys say they can charge less because their supplier charges them less. They adjust their price based on the going rate posted on their supplier's Web site, and prices dipped to their current level about a month ago. On Wednesday, they charged $1.91, a price that remained in effect later in the week at their station in North Wales.
BUSINESS
July 9, 2003 | By Reid Kanaley INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The lights came on for one last time yesterday at Avenue B, the bankrupt Broad Street eatery owned by flamboyant restaurateur Neil Stein, as scavengers swarmed in to bid on the tables and chairs, silverware, skillets, artwork, refrigerators, pots and pans, the liquor license, and a baby grand piano. "It's being torn apart by hundreds of people," Stein, who did not visit Avenue B yesterday, said by phone in midafternoon. "It's a pretty trying day. " The contents of the fine-dining restaurant, which closed May 18, were sold off to pay Stein's creditors.
BUSINESS
May 22, 2003 | By Linda K. Harris INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The letter arrived from London. "Dear Richard, "I CANNOT BELIEVE IT! "My mother phoned me late last night to tell me that Dan's was closing down. It can't be . . . It can't be. " Yes, ladies, it's true. Dan's Shoes' two locations, the big one at 1733 Chestnut St. and the smaller at 1306 Chestnut St., will shutter their doors on June 14, victims of the stagnant economy. For 20 years, Dan's was the place in Philadelphia where soubrettes, divas and debutantes bargain-shopped alongside clerks, cowgirls and careerists - all for the lust of the shoemaker's last.
NEWS
December 27, 2001 | By Marcia Gelbart and Henry J. Holcomb INQUIRER STAFF WRITERS
Post-Christmas bargain-hunting is a holiday tradition for Verna Powell of Sicklerville, who heads to Cherry Hill Mall every Dec. 26 to take advantage of sale prices. At the King of Prussia mall yesterday, Austin Carney of Phoenixville, Chester County, was doing what he always does - buying Christmas presents for his wife. "We take care of the kids before Christmas, and shop for each other the day after," he explained, resting on a bench. Malls throughout the region and across the nation reported brisk sales yesterday, adding a year-end spark to a lackluster year in retailing.
NEWS
August 16, 2001 | By Gloria A. Hoffner INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
If history repeats itself, at 5 o'clock tomorrow morning, book dealers, book lovers and bargain seekers will be waiting outside Old Marple Elementary School for the 10 a.m. opening of the Newtown Public Library Book Sale. Equipped with shopping carts on loan from Acme Markets, the early-bird buyers will jump from lawn chairs when the doors open and rush inside with long lists of desired titles. They are drawn by more than 40,000 adult and children's books, audio books, and magazines, said Lawrence Graff, cochairman of the sale, which runs through Aug. 26. "The sale attracts more then 350 book dealers who come from New York, New England and Atlanta," Graff said, adding that the sale raises about $16,000 for the library.
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