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Bargaining

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SPORTS
March 20, 1987 | By PHIL JASNER, Daily News Sports Writer
The 76ers are 11 1/2 games away from Boston in the NBA's Atlantic Division. Denver, tonight's opponent at the Spectrum, is even farther out of first place in the Midwest Division. The NBA Players Association would dearly love to be that close in its early negotiations toward a new collective bargaining agreement with the owners. But it isn't. The two sides are miles apart. "In our initial meeting, we had given the owners our proposal, and now they have given us ours," said Charles Grantham, executive vice president of the players association, arriving in town last night after yesterday's second negotiating session in New York.
SPORTS
November 11, 1994 | Daily News Wire Services
The major league baseball talks resumed and the owners reshuffled their bargaining team by appointing Boston Red Sox chief executive officer John Harrington as their lead negotiator. The move, announced yesterday by acting commissioner Bud Selig, came during the first substantive negotiating session between the parties since Sept. 9, five days before owners canceled the World Series for the first time since 1904. Until now, Richard Ravitch had been management's head bargainer. Management downplayed the shift in public comments.
NEWS
March 17, 2011 | By Matt Katz, Inquirer Trenton Bureau
TRENTON - Gov. Christie said Wednesday that he would not negotiate health benefits for public workers through collective bargaining and instead would try to change the law to increase contributions toward health premiums. "We're not negotiating this. We're going for a legislative fix. That's the plan," Christie said at a Statehouse news conference. That drew an immediate comparison to Wisconsin Gov. Scott Walker, the Republican who inflamed passions on both sides of the union debate when he moved to limit collective-bargaining rights for most public workers.
NEWS
December 18, 2001 | By Larry Eichel
So the city and the state are ready to resume negotiations over the future of the Philadelphia schools, as if they had any other choice. Oh, sure, last week's headline-grabbing duel of leaks seemed to threaten the talks, what with the revelations that the state had already worked out a post-takeover contract with Edison Schools Inc. and that the city was exploring various ways to sabotage the state's efforts. But in my mind, there's one word to describe those pyrotechnics.
SPORTS
February 22, 1990 | By Glen Macnow, Inquirer Staff Writer
Baseball's already contentious labor talks took a turn for the worse yesterday as the players flatly rejected management's latest proposal, calling it "a giant step backwards. " Talks between the two sides broke off late in the afternoon, with representatives of each saying they did not expect to hold another session today. As the lockout of players enters its eighth day, there are growing indications that the regular season - and not just spring training - will be delayed. "I want to play baseball more than anything," said pitcher Orel Hershiser of the Los Angeles Dodgers, who attended yesterday's bargaining session.
SPORTS
February 11, 2011 | By Jonathan Tamari, Inquirer Staff Writer
Wednesday negotiations turned into Thursday acrimony as the NFL and its players union called off a follow-up bargaining session and the league canceled an owners' meeting scheduled for Tuesday in Philadelphia. The decision to cancel Thursday's sit-down illustrated just how far apart the two sides are on a new collective-bargaining agreement, with their current deal set to expire March 3. The players were quick to blame the owners for the breakdown after the two sides met in Washington on Wednesday.
SPORTS
October 26, 2007 | Daily News Staff Report
The National Lacrosse League will have a season after all. Nine days after the league canceled its schedule because of a labor impasse, the NLL announced a 7-year collective bargaining agreement yesterday. The deal between the league and the Professional Lacrosse Players' Association begins with the upcoming season and extends through the 2014 season. It is the longest labor deal in the 22-year history of pro indoor lacrosse. The league announced the season had been canceled when the sides could not come to an agreement by a midnight deadline on Oct. 15. "Reaching a long-term collective bargaining agreement with the players was our No. 1 priority in this process," commissioner Jim Jennings said in a statement.
SPORTS
December 22, 1994 | by Les Bowen, Daily News Sports Writer
In case anybody had any doubts, more than 200 members of the NHL Players Association affirmed what their player representatives already had said: The union is not willing to accept a collective bargaining agreement that includes a payroll tax. But it seemed clear after yesterday's meeting, maybe the last general membership meeting before that elusive deadline for canceling the season, that talks will resume soon, working around a framework that...
SPORTS
February 15, 2011 | By Jonathan Tamari, Inquirer Staff Writer
The NFL and its players union have gone from bargaining to legal action in less than a week. The sides sat down to talk Wednesday, but a follow-up meeting was canceled and on Monday the league charged that the NFL Players Association is not bargaining in good faith. The owners' filing with the National Labor Relations Board accuses the players of "surface bargaining" designed to "run out the clock" on the current collective bargaining agreement, which expires March 3. If that date passed and a lockout begins, the players could decertify their union and bring an antitrust suit against the league, which the complaint says is the NFLPA's true goal.
BUSINESS
January 31, 1996 | By Mary Blakinger, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Eleventh-hour negotiations between Lukens Steel and the United Steelworkers of America were to continue today as both sides seek agreement before the current contract expires at 12:01 a.m. tomorrow. "We are conducting intense negotiations, and have been since Monday. I expect we'll be bargaining well into Wednesday," Lukens spokesman Richard Whitmyre said yesterday. "At this point, I don't want to single out any issue as key," he added. A spokesman for Steelworkers Local 1165, which represents 1,150 workers at the Coatesville plant, could not be reached yesterday for comment on the talks.
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FOOD
March 4, 2016
A better board on a budget The trick to buying a bargain cutting board is finding one that doesn't look like it. Ikea, with its new, limited-edition line of acacia wood cutting boards, is a good place to start. The range of sizes includes boards almost two feet long. - Samantha Melamed Skogsta chopping board, $5.99 to $12.99 at Ikea. Gluten-free (and good!) At long last, Tate's Bake Shop brings us gluten-free cookies worthy of being called "cookies. " The crispy, scrumptious offerings substitute rice flour for wheat.
BUSINESS
November 30, 2015 | By Jonathan Takiff, Inquirer Technology Writer
When it comes to home TV viewing, a bigger screen is almost always better. Films and sporting events carry far more weight. Performers seem more expressive. Sit close (or buy a larger display) and the connection can be as strong as that of a movie theater. The only problem: When flat-panel TV screens grow bigger than 70 inches, prices go berserk. An 80-inch high-definition set goes for at least $4,000, and a flagship 84-inch Samsung ultra -high-def TV could cost $40,000. Tagged at $129,999, Vizio's new Reference Series 120-inch UHD is as costly as a Maserati GranTurismo.
NEWS
September 24, 2015 | By Jessica Parks, Inquirer Staff Writer
The court battle over the Chester Upland School District's fate is on hold again after state education officials Tuesday withdrew their recovery plan amid "continuing discussions" with charter schools. In a statement, the administration and the district's state-appointed receiver said they stand behind their plan to slash charter-school funding in the district but are still talking "with involved parties to reach a resolution that puts Chester Upland on solid financial footing. " A proposal submitted in August to Delaware County Court Judge Chad F. Kenney sought to reduce the district's reimbursements to charter schools, especially relating to special education, to close a deficit that is nearing $24 million.
NEWS
June 30, 2015
IT WOULD be wrong to say that Gov. Wolf and the legislative Republicans aren't on the same page when it comes to spending and taxes. They aren't even on the same planet. The governor has an ambitious plan to fashion a "grand bargain" that balances the budget, increases state aid to public schools and lowers local property taxes by increasing the personal income tax, sales tax and by imposing a severance tax on Marcellus Shale gas. The Republicans have countered with an ambitious plan to deny reality and to say "no" to any talk about taxes, even the natural-gas tax. It wouldn't be so bad if this stance were a posture taken as part of the hard bargaining that must go on if we are to have a new budget anytime this year.
NEWS
June 23, 2015 | By Rita Giordano, Inquirer Staff Writer
For the Chicago Blackhawks, it's the Stanley Cup. For the New England Patriots, it was the Super Bowl ring. For Cherry Hill Mall shopper Jennifer Sommers, the moment of glory was the fabulous Michael Kors purse she scored on Memorial Day. Already 35 percent off, the price was slashed another 25 percent in the holiday sale. "It was at least a $300 purse," crowed a triumphant Sommers, 36, a social worker from Northeast Philadelphia. She was back at the mall recently with bags of booty from the semiannual sales at Bath and Body Works - $12.50 body wash for $3.50!
BUSINESS
March 12, 2015 | By Alan J. Heavens, Inquirer Real Estate Writer
Few Philadelphians are as unequivocal in their praise for the city as Frank Steele. What is surprising, however, is that Steele is a native New Yorker, and still lives with his wife, Mary Jo, and three daughters on the "Queens side of the Whitestone Bridge. " "We are in love with Philly," said Steele, a consultant for the New York City school system, citing "the tradition and landmarks, and especially the Reading Terminal Market. " The Steeles' connection to Philadelphia is a condo in the Peninsula building at Waterfront Square that they bought in June 2014.
SPORTS
February 20, 2015 | By Bob Brookover, Inquirer Columnist
CLEARWATER, Fla. - Inside Bright House Field Wednesday morning, Ryne Sandberg was trying to put a happy face on a grim situation. On the eve of his second spring training as Phillies manager, he talked about how eager he was to get a longer look at some of his younger players. He called this a "transition" period rather than a rebuilding one. "You never know in baseball," he said. "You get the right guys together on the same page, you just never know. " Meanwhile, in Tampa, the staff ace the Phillies tried to trade this offseason was telling a reporter from USA Today how badly he wanted to turn the page.
NEWS
February 16, 2015 | By Melissa Dribben, Inquirer Staff Writer
For the first time in the seven years Goodwill Industries has held its annual blow-out, line-up-before-the-sun-rises bridal sale extravaganza in New Jersey, the event landed on Valentine's Day. This calendrical coincidence, this alignment of the stars and sweetheart necklines, this convergence of warm hearts and cold cash - oh, yes, oh, yes, it was meant to be. And so it was that four bitterly cold hours before the doors opened at 9 a.m., Pat...
NEWS
January 6, 2015 | By Julia Terruso, Inquirer Staff Writer
Jackie Smith is offering her Coatesville home for rent for $15,000 during the week of the papal visit in September. She envisions her guests will be a few out-of-state families who opt to share the postwar bungalow an hour's drive from Center City. If Smith, a single mother who works at Wegmans, has her way, she hopes to use the money to go on a cruise with her mother and daughter, all still coping with the death of her 16-year-old son three years ago. "It'd be nice, just us three girls, to get away," she said.
NEWS
December 12, 2014 | By Kristen A. Graham, Inquirer Staff Writer
HARRISBURG - With much at stake, lawyers for the School Reform Commission on Wednesday asked a panel of five Commonwealth Court judges to affirm their power to cancel the Philadelphia School District teachers' contract. The law that created the SRC acknowledged that in times of distress, the commission must have at its disposal special powers, argued commission attorney Mark Aronchick. "The polestar is the children, not the protection of some collective bargaining interest that protects the interest of teachers," Aronchick told the judges.
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