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Bargaining

SPORTS
October 8, 1994 | Daily News Wire Services
Union head Donald Fehr and acting commissioner Bud Selig said they expect negotiations to resume late next week, nearly five weeks after talks broke off. On a day that saw owners file seven grievances, the union yesterday failed to give an answer to management's request for a 45-day freeze on signings and free agent signings. Clubs also sent notices to eight players - among them Tom Browning, Tony Fernandez and Rob Dibble, of Cincinnati, and Baltimore's Chris Sabo - indicating they will be sent outright to the minor leagues.
NEWS
September 16, 1986 | By VALERIA M. RUSS, Daily News Staff Writer
Schools Superintendent Constance E. Clayton was accused last night of "union-busting" after she outlined a plan under which principals and other middle-management employees would become involved in directly running the district's operations. "During the past year, we left behind an era in which these administrators perceived themselves and were perceived by the board and senior staff as collective-bargaining adversaries sitting across the negotiating table," Clayton told the school board at its meeting yesterday.
NEWS
May 17, 1991 | By Martha Woodall, Inquirer Staff Writer
Despite their non-adversarial approach to collective bargaining, Philadelphia-area Catholic high school teachers and the archdiocese have declared an impasse and halted their negotiations. The contract expires Aug. 31. On Wednesday morning, negotiators for Local 1776 of the Association of Catholic Teachers said the process - designed to produce a new contract by mid-May - had failed. "The bottom line was that they were asking for givebacks on health insurance," said Rita Schwartz, union president.
SPORTS
November 12, 1991 | By Tim Panaccio, Inquirer Staff Writer
In the aftermath of Magic Johnson's announcement that he has the HIV virus, the Major League Baseball Players Association and the NBA Players Association say they will discuss the possibility of testing athletes for AIDS. The discussions will take place at the unions' next scheduled meetings, representatives of the organizations said yesterday. Although the collective-bargaining agreements for baseball and basketball will not expire until 1993 at the earliest, both unions say the agreements could easily be amended to introduce AIDS testing sooner.
SPORTS
July 13, 2011 | By PAUL HAGEN, hagenp@phillynews.com
PHOENIX - Baseball's labor contract expires at the end of this season. So far, at least, that hasn't caused the tension and angst or created the headlines that have marked ongoing negotiations between the NFL and the NBA and their players. Michael Weiner, executive director of the Major League Baseball Players Association, met with members of the Baseball Writers Association of America yesterday. And while he cautioned that there is still work to be done, he also painted a picture of a sport that has largely moved beyond the sort of intransigent bargaining that occurred in previous years.
SPORTS
March 29, 2004 | FROM INQUIRER WIRE SERVICES
The baseball players' union might agree to drug testing along Olympic guidelines for a World Cup, which could lead to an agreement within a week to have a tournament before the 2005 season. Gene Orza, the union's chief operating officer, met yesterday with Rob Manfred, management's top labor lawyer. Orza had been critical of Olympic drug-testing rules, repeatedly saying they were a byproduct of the athletes' lack of collective-bargaining rights. Aldo Notari, president of the International Baseball Federation, has said his organization cannot not endorse a tournament unless there is testing along Olympic guidelines.
SPORTS
September 30, 1995 | THE INQUIRER STAFF
The Second U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals in New York yesterday upheld a lower-court decision against baseball club owners, making it unlikely there will be any changes in the sport's economic system this winter. In a 3-0 vote, the court ruled that the owners' Player Relations Committee tried to illegally eliminate free agency, salary arbitration, and the anti- collusion provisions of the expired collective-bargaining agreement. "The unilateral elimination of free agency and salary arbitration followed by just three days a promise to restore the status quo," Judge Ralph Winter wrote.
NEWS
September 18, 1986 | By Sara Solovitch, Inquirer Staff Writer
Negotiators in the Souderton School District ended 16 straight hours of bargaining yesterday without reaching a solution to the two-week-old strike by 280 teachers. The marathon session, which began at 6.30 p.m. Tuesday, broke up at 10.30 a.m. yesterday with no further talks scheduled, a union spokeswoman said. Also yesterday, substitute teachers began teaching the district's high school seniors at $130 a day, union officials said. School district officials could not be reached for comment.
SPORTS
June 26, 1991 | By Gary Miles, Inquirer Staff Writer
The NHL's board of governors said that reducing game-roster size from 18 skaters to 17 would decrease the number of fighters and save the teams money. It also said the rule would take effect next season. NHL Players Association official Sam Simpson and Flyers coach Paul Holmgren aren't so sure about all that. The board of governors voted earlier this week to reduce the game-roster size next season. The reasoning behind the change was that too many teams dressed players for the sole purpose of fighting and that cutting the number of players would eliminate some of the one-dimensional brawlers.
NEWS
March 3, 2011 | By Matt Katz, Inquirer Trenton Bureau
HILLSBOROUGH, N.J. - Gov. Christie expressed "love" for collective-bargaining rights Wednesday, saying he was eager to begin negotiating with public-worker unions to create contracts that are fair to taxpayers. "Let me at them," Christie said at a town-hall meeting in this central New Jersey community. "Get me out of the cage, and let me go!" Christie said the "Democratic Party and liberals in the media" were trying to compare Wisconsin Gov. Scott Walker - who has drawn controversy for trying to get rid of some collective-bargaining rights - with Christie, who is pushing for state workers to pay more for pensions and health care.
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