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Barlett And Steele

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NEWS
February 1, 1997 | by Myung Oak Kim, Daily News Staff Writer
Donald L. Barlett and James B. Steele, the Pulitzer Prize-winning investigative reporter team, announced yesterday that they will leave the Philadelphia Inquirer to work for Time Inc. This is the third major departure from the Inquirer to Time in 13 months. Last week, columnist Steve Lopez announced he was leaving to become a writer for Time-Life magazines. In December 1995, managing editor Steve Lovelady also left for the media empire in New York City. Lovelady will supervise Barlett and Steele, who will work on investigative projects for several publications, as well as on television documentaries and books.
NEWS
April 17, 2011
Donald L. Barlett and James B. Steele have embarked on an update of their 1991 "America: What Went Wrong?" project, which was published in The Inquirer. Through a collaboration with the Investigative Reporting Workshop at American University, The Inquirer will run pieces from the new project, "What Went Wrong: The Betrayal of the American Dream," over the coming year. For more on the project, visit http://americawhatwentwrong.org/ Here are their responses to our questions: Question: You recently announced that you will be revisiting the "America: What Went Wrong?"
NEWS
July 22, 2012 | Reviewed by Leonard Downie Jr
The Betrayal of the American Dream By Donald L. Barlett and James B. Steele Public Affairs. 320 pp. $26.99   Just in time for this year's election, Donald L. Barlett and James B. Steele are continuing the crusade to save the American middle class that they began two decades ago as star investigative reporters at The Philadelphia Inquirer. Their 1991 nine-day series in The Inquirer, "America: What Went Wrong," was ahead of its time in contending that, in the wake of the last big recession, the middle class was being squeezed by the rich, big corporations, and government policies.
NEWS
February 1, 1997 | By David O'Reilly, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Donald L. Barlett and James B. Steele, whose investigative reporting at The Inquirer won two Pulitzer Prizes, announced yesterday that they were leaving the newspaper after 26 years to work for media giant Time Warner. Barlett and Steele won national acclaim for articles scrutinizing topics as diverse as federal tax policy, fraud in federal housing programs, American foreign aid, the energy crisis, and nuclear waste disposal. Their investigative reports, which often took years to research and write, sought to portray the toll that government and corporate practices took on average citizens.
NEWS
September 15, 1996
REACTIONS TO 'AMERICA: WHO STOLE THE DREAM?' THOSE FOR . . . "America: Who Stole the Dream" is brilliant, reflecting meticulous research and plain-talk reporting. Now I know the truth about NAFTA. Now I better understand that lower prices for goods are nothing to the unemployed workers who can't afford to buy them. Yes, "the true cost of the cheaper imported shirt [is] in lost jobs and a declining American standard of living. " Global economy is a euphemism for corporate greed.
NEWS
October 14, 1996 | By Stephen Golub
Median family income increased sharply, income inequality decreased, poverty rates declined, and health insurance coverage rose. Poverty rates for African Americans and the elderly reached all-time lows. Ironically, this remarkably positive picture of the American economy's performance in 1995 was released by the Census Bureau just after publication of "America: Who Stole the Dream?" by Inquirer reporters Donald L. Barlett and James B. Steele. The series was a disturbing chronicle of individual American workers' hardships in the face of job losses and wage declines, and their deep anxieties.
NEWS
April 14, 1992 | by Francesca Chapman, Daily News Television Critic
If the go-go decade of the 1980s was a noisy, open-bar, all-night party for many Americans, Donald Barlett and James Steele are the guys jabbing at us and offering a mug of black coffee at 7 a.m. It would be nice to roll over and go back to sleep. But it's really time to sit up and have a slug of that joe. Did you vote for Ronald Reagan, not once but twice? Have a sip. Believe that huge corporate profits would eventually "trickle down" to the little guy? Have another sip. Did you really think that "synergy" and "lean" were anything but euphemisms for layoffs and factory closings?
NEWS
November 6, 1990
God bless Barlett and Steele. Nobody else has the wit or diligence to wade through the mountains of paper generated by our government. Nobody else consistently follows the advice of the sainted I.F. Stone, actually scouring documents to find the hidden zingers in 1,000-page tax bills. The stuff would bewilder any mere citizen. Congress, though it is frequently said to write laws, doesn't read them. Most of the news media, hypnotized into breathless stupidity by handicapping what this means to the careers of the Honorables and the Chief Liar, doesn't bother.
NEWS
February 2, 1997 | By David O'Reilly, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Donald L. Barlett and James B. Steele, The Inquirer's nationally acclaimed team of investigative reporters, are leaving the newspaper after 26 years to work for media giant Time Warner. Barlett and Steele, who have reported on such topics as nuclear waste disposal, federal tax policy, the energy crisis, American foreign aid and housing fraud, said Friday that they will write for various Time Inc. magazines and hope to branch out into television documentaries. "This is a rare, extraordinary opportunity," said Steele.
NEWS
September 8, 1996
There's a choice we Americans make in our freewheeling, individualistic, consumer-driven society, a choice that often comes down to this: What's the best price? What's the best price for a computer, never mind where it is manufactured? What's the best price for a dozen roses, no matter where they were grown? What's the cheapest price for a day's work, regardless of where it is done? It is a question we ask constantly, in the store or at work, during a school board meeting or a congressional debate.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
August 20, 2012 | By PETE MATTHEWS
LAST SUNDAY, the Inquirer printed an excerpt from the "Betrayal of the American Dream" by Donald L. Barlett and James B. Steele that detailed the ongoing attacks against defined-benefit retirement plans and the push to replace them with risky and far-less-secure 401(k) plans. Calling this movement "reform," many employers, including elected governmental employers, have been creating two separate systems of retirees. One class of retirees, the rich, will have everything they need and much more, while a second class of retirees - the vast majority of American workers - will have the crumbs and leftovers of a shredded social safety net to help them in their twilight years.
NEWS
August 20, 2012
In "The Betrayal of the American Dream," Donald L. Barlett and James B. Steele revisit their 1991 Inquirer series, "America: What Went Wrong," in which they forecast a decline of the middle class. Now, they document how actions going back three decades have left millions of Americans in economic ruin. Today, the authors, in answers to questions posed by The Inquirer, outline their ideas for how the United States can solve its economic problems, the focus of the final chapter of their book.
NEWS
July 22, 2012 | Reviewed by Leonard Downie Jr
The Betrayal of the American Dream By Donald L. Barlett and James B. Steele Public Affairs. 320 pp. $26.99   Just in time for this year's election, Donald L. Barlett and James B. Steele are continuing the crusade to save the American middle class that they began two decades ago as star investigative reporters at The Philadelphia Inquirer. Their 1991 nine-day series in The Inquirer, "America: What Went Wrong," was ahead of its time in contending that, in the wake of the last big recession, the middle class was being squeezed by the rich, big corporations, and government policies.
NEWS
April 17, 2011
Donald L. Barlett and James B. Steele have embarked on an update of their 1991 "America: What Went Wrong?" project, which was published in The Inquirer. Through a collaboration with the Investigative Reporting Workshop at American University, The Inquirer will run pieces from the new project, "What Went Wrong: The Betrayal of the American Dream," over the coming year. For more on the project, visit http://americawhatwentwrong.org/ Here are their responses to our questions: Question: You recently announced that you will be revisiting the "America: What Went Wrong?"
NEWS
May 31, 2009 | BY JEFF GAMMAGE INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
In the history of The Inquirer, the Annenberg era lasted 34 years, the Knight Ridder era 36 years, and the McClatchy era about 15 minutes. The California company announced it would sell The Inquirer in the same breath in which it announced the purchase, so eager was the firm to rid itself of a number of newspapers included in its takeover of the Knight Ridder chain. So, in spring 2006, the Philadelphia newspaper executives made presentations to six potential buyers, among them an eager group of local businesspeople led by advertising entrepreneur Brian P. Tierney.
NEWS
February 2, 1997 | By David O'Reilly, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Donald L. Barlett and James B. Steele, The Inquirer's nationally acclaimed team of investigative reporters, are leaving the newspaper after 26 years to work for media giant Time Warner. Barlett and Steele, who have reported on such topics as nuclear waste disposal, federal tax policy, the energy crisis, American foreign aid and housing fraud, said Friday that they will write for various Time Inc. magazines and hope to branch out into television documentaries. "This is a rare, extraordinary opportunity," said Steele.
NEWS
February 1, 1997 | by Myung Oak Kim, Daily News Staff Writer
Donald L. Barlett and James B. Steele, the Pulitzer Prize-winning investigative reporter team, announced yesterday that they will leave the Philadelphia Inquirer to work for Time Inc. This is the third major departure from the Inquirer to Time in 13 months. Last week, columnist Steve Lopez announced he was leaving to become a writer for Time-Life magazines. In December 1995, managing editor Steve Lovelady also left for the media empire in New York City. Lovelady will supervise Barlett and Steele, who will work on investigative projects for several publications, as well as on television documentaries and books.
NEWS
February 1, 1997 | By David O'Reilly, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Donald L. Barlett and James B. Steele, whose investigative reporting at The Inquirer won two Pulitzer Prizes, announced yesterday that they were leaving the newspaper after 26 years to work for media giant Time Warner. Barlett and Steele won national acclaim for articles scrutinizing topics as diverse as federal tax policy, fraud in federal housing programs, American foreign aid, the energy crisis, and nuclear waste disposal. Their investigative reports, which often took years to research and write, sought to portray the toll that government and corporate practices took on average citizens.
NEWS
October 14, 1996 | By Stephen Golub
Median family income increased sharply, income inequality decreased, poverty rates declined, and health insurance coverage rose. Poverty rates for African Americans and the elderly reached all-time lows. Ironically, this remarkably positive picture of the American economy's performance in 1995 was released by the Census Bureau just after publication of "America: Who Stole the Dream?" by Inquirer reporters Donald L. Barlett and James B. Steele. The series was a disturbing chronicle of individual American workers' hardships in the face of job losses and wage declines, and their deep anxieties.
NEWS
September 29, 1996 | By Michael Reisch
Corporate greed, failed public policies and unforeseen global circumstances have "stolen" the American Dream. So argue Barlett and Steele. But while there's appeal to an "American Dream" as a societal goal, it can be dangerous to focus policy debates on its restoration. First, nostalgia over a lost dream ignores recent history. The American Dream was a short-lived phenomenon - lasting roughly from 1945-1975 - when a unique constellation of economic and political forces enabled the United States to dominate the world markets and simultaneously negotiate wage agreements with unionized workers that assured labor-management peace at home.
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