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NEWS
May 26, 1989 | By Lita Solis-Cohen, Special to The Inquirer
Twenty-two American paintings from the collection of the late Violette de Mazia, who taught art appreciation at the Barnes Foundation in Merion for 60 years, sold for $2.38 million yesterday at Christie's auction house in New York. That amount, added to the $5 million paid earlier this month for eight impressionist and modern works and $644,000 paid in April for de Mazia's furniture and furnishings, brought the proceeds from de Mazia's estate to more than $8 million. Still to be sold are a half-dozen paintings and de Mazia's house in Lower Merion.
NEWS
July 25, 1990 | By Lucinda Fleeson, Inquirer Staff Writer
Philadelphia lawyer Richard H. Glanton has been elected president of the Barnes Foundation in Merion, administrator of one of the world's most renowned collections of impressionist and postimpressionist art. Glanton, 43, served as deputy counsel to Richard Thornburgh when he was governor of Pennsylvania. He had been counsel to the foundation for the last year, a post that he resigned to become president, but will continue as general counsel to Lincoln University in Chester County.
NEWS
September 3, 2000 | By Catherine Quillman, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Aside from its priceless collection of French Impressionist paintings, the Barnes Foundation may be best known for the stringent restrictions its founder, Dr. Albert C. Barnes, placed on the collection's presentation. Before his death in a 1951 automobile accident, the pharmaceutical magnate wrote a will that stipulated how his art should be viewed and studied. Among the stipulations, the works were to remain hung in the exact floor-to-ceiling arrangement that Barnes devised when he opened the 23-room gallery adjacent to his Merion home in 1922.
NEWS
November 7, 2015 | By Stephan Salisbury, Inquirer Culture Writer
Sylvie Patry, chief curator of impressionist and post-impressionist painting at the Musée d'Orsay in Paris, has been named chief curator and deputy director of collections and exhibitions at the Barnes Foundation, officials announced Thursday. Her appointment - she will assume her duties in January - comes as the foundation on the Benjamin Franklin Parkway is poised to roll out an expansive plan embracing multiple ways of thinking about art, teaching art, and bringing art to the broader community.
NEWS
April 19, 2012 | By Stephan Salisbury, Inquirer Culture Writer
Brett Miller, 47, general counsel for the Barnes Foundation who defended the foundation's move from suburban Merion to the Benjamin Franklin Parkway in recent court hearings, was found dead at his Old City home Saturday, April 14. A spokesman for the Philadelphia Medical Examiner's Office attributed the cause of death to a self-inflicted gunshot wound. "The board of trustees and the staff of the Barnes Foundation are deeply saddened by the tragic loss of our colleague and friend Brett Miller," Derek Gillman, the director of the foundation, said in a statement to the Art Newspaper, which on Monday reported Mr. Miller's death.
NEWS
October 13, 1995 | By Leonard W. Boasberg, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
With the Barnes Foundation's "gala reopening" just a month away, the trustees have asked for an "emergency hearing" to appeal a ruling that apparently forbids them to hold the event on the foundation premises. Despite the ruling by Montgomery County Orphans Court Judge Stanley R. Ott, the foundation has proceeded with plans for the $500-to-$1,000-a-person event to be held on the grounds. The Nov. 11 gala is to celebrate the reinstallation of the world-renowned collection of art, in a building closed for more than two years for a $12 million renovation.
NEWS
January 8, 2015 | By Stephan Salisbury, INQUIRER CULTURE WRITER
The Barnes Foundation has selected Thomas Collins, head of the resurgent Pérez Art Museum in Miami, to be its new chief executive and president, the museum announced Wednesday. A native of the Philadelphia area, Collins, 46, will assume the post in March at an institution that is now in its third year on the Benjamin Franklin Parkway. He succeeds Derek Gillman, who guided the Barnes from 2006 to 2013, when the Barnes successfully, if sometimes contentiously, moved its spectacular collection of impressionist and early modernist art from its long-time home in Merion to in Philadelphia.
NEWS
October 16, 2010 | By Stephan Salisbury, Inquirer Culture Writer
In stark contrast to the lengthy and contentious battle over its move to the city, construction of the new museum and gallery for the Barnes Foundation on the Benjamin Franklin Parkway has been proceeding at a rapid clip. On Friday, construction workers were already clambering over the in-place roof of one building section - the gallery that will house the famed collection that now resides in suburban Merion. Bill McDowell, project executive, said there had been no problems with the $150 million building effort.
NEWS
March 11, 2016 | By Stephan Salisbury, Staff Writer
The Barnes Foundation will show a mid-career retrospective this summer of the work of Nari Ward, filling its special exhibition space with Ward's idiosyncratic assemblages, installations, and sculptures fashioned from objects found around the 52-year-old artist's New York neighborhood. "Sun Splashed," on view from June 24 to Aug. 22, features more than 30 works. Thom Collins, Barnes executive director and president, said the Ward exhibition would create "a fascinating dialogue" with the Barnes' permanent collection, including the foundation's potent holdings of African art. "With the content of the collection, the context it provides, and Dr. Barnes' history of supporting African American culture and the Harlem Renaissance," Collins said, "there are many interesting connections to explore through the contemporary lens of the show.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
September 5, 2016 | By John Timpane and A.D. Amorosi
    Philly Fringe curated shows: Dancing through the arts   By John Timpane Fringe festivals are where all the arts get together and have babies. Genres get busted, mixed like cocktails, grafted, married, and hybridized. And what children emerge!: dancing music, theatrical song, juggling tap, virtual Shakespeare, live-streamed performance-art rhumba Camus set in Pottstown or Africa or on Mars. The 2016 Philadelphia Fringe Festival - its 20th anniversary iteration runs from Thursday through Sept.
NEWS
September 3, 2016
Sweet deal Every first Sunday of the month, the Barnes Foundation offers free admission for its stunning collection of some of the greatest art ever created. But this free Sunday is sweeter than the rest. Weckerly's Ice Cream, the small-batch purveyor in West Philadelphia, has set up a pop-up shop at the Barnes so you can fuel your love of art and your sweet tooth. In addition to such flavors as nectarine- rosemary sorbet, caramel corn, and peaches and cream, the Weckerly's pop-up will also sell an exclusive ice cream sandwich called the Barnes Ensemble.
BUSINESS
July 30, 2016 | By Harold Brubaker, Staff Writer
The Barnes Foundation has been booked this week with a string of parties related to the Democratic National Convention. "Normally, July private events are few, so this is a tremendous increase in activity," Barnes spokeswoman Deirdre Maher said. Hotels were nearly full, streets around the Pennsylvania Convention Center and City Hall bustled with pedestrians, and some restaurants were booked by out-of-towners for the entire week. Does this mean that the convention, which brought an estimated 50,000 people to Philadelphia - about the same as for the annual Army-Navy football game - was an economic boon for the region?
NEWS
June 22, 2016 | By Stephan Salisbury, Staff Writer
WHEN JAMAICA-BORN Nari Ward, 53, was preparing for a large 2011 exhibition at Mass MoCA, the contemporary art museum in North Adams, Mass., he took a look around and knew exactly what he needed. Snowmen tourists. Obviously. It was a case of art speaking to the new economics of western Massachusetts, a place once known for making things, but now importing art-making to attract traveling consumers. Mango Tourist , his gaggle of eight seared-foam, capacitor-bedecked, mango-seed-studded, 10-foot-tall figures was born, a wry reflection on the shared lives of the Berkshire hills and sunburned Jamaica.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 11, 2016 | By Lauren McCutcheon, FOR DoTHIS
"A lot of us know what to do when we go to a baseball game: You buy a hotdog, yell a lot, clap and cheer and whistle," said Ruth Anderson, director of arts education at Doylestown's James A. Michener Art Museum. Less obvious: How you and your kids should approach a staid and seemingly stodgy art museum. Five big-deal venues share tips for introducing children to their collections, exhibitions, and programs - and have fun doing it. Barnes Foundation 2025 Benjamin Franklin Parkway, 215-278-7200 . Family programming is relatively new - as in, fewer than five years old - at the Barnes.
NEWS
May 23, 2016
On May 3, WHYY hosted its 15th annual President's Dinner. This year's WHYY Lifelong Learning Award was presented to Joe Neubauer for his commitment to education, the arts, and business. The former Aramark CEO is currently the Barnes Foundation board chairman. The evening offered guests a welcoming reception in the Dorrance Hamilton Public Media Commons at WHYY, a sit-down dinner and program, a dessert reception, and an exclusive interview of the honoree with Terry Gross, co-executive producer and host of Fresh Air.
NEWS
April 10, 2016 | By Dan DeLuca, Music Critic
Deadlines are a nuisance. There's a story I heard on the audio tour at the Barnes Foundation that - like most discussions of great art - eventually will bring me back to subject of Kanye West. One of Dr. Albert Barnes' favorite artists was Maurice Prendergast, the American post-impressionist who has 21 paintings in the museum on the Ben Franklin Parkway. The story goes that Prendergast was frequently tempted to alter his own works. Once, while dining chez Barnes, he sneaked off to add a few brushstrokes to one of his paintings hanging on the wall at the doctor's Merion manse.
NEWS
April 3, 2016 | By John Timpane, Staff Writer
After taking over the town in 2011 and again in 2013, the Philadelphia International Festival of the Arts (PIFA) is back April 8-23. Comprising more than 60 events, it kicks off with Article 13 , a huge multimedia, multigenre installation, and it closes with a big street fair, on Broad Street between Chestnut and South Streets, with art, food, vendors, and entertainment. Curated by the Kimmel Center for the Performing Arts, the festival takes as its theme "We Are What We Make. " A massive installation on that theme by MacArthur Award-winner Mimi Lien will take over the Kimmel lobby.
NEWS
March 11, 2016 | By Stephan Salisbury, Staff Writer
The Barnes Foundation will show a mid-career retrospective this summer of the work of Nari Ward, filling its special exhibition space with Ward's idiosyncratic assemblages, installations, and sculptures fashioned from objects found around the 52-year-old artist's New York neighborhood. "Sun Splashed," on view from June 24 to Aug. 22, features more than 30 works. Thom Collins, Barnes executive director and president, said the Ward exhibition would create "a fascinating dialogue" with the Barnes' permanent collection, including the foundation's potent holdings of African art. "With the content of the collection, the context it provides, and Dr. Barnes' history of supporting African American culture and the Harlem Renaissance," Collins said, "there are many interesting connections to explore through the contemporary lens of the show.
NEWS
March 8, 2016 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Staff Writer
Ann Caroline Barnes, 83, of Rosemont, an artist and former television producer, died of an intestinal infection Tuesday, Feb. 23, at Bryn Mawr Hospital. Mrs. Barnes died on her 83rd birthday in the same Main Line hospital where she was born, said one of her sons, D. Alexander Barnes. As her strength ebbed, Mrs. Barnes heard lullabies being played on the loudspeaker - the hospital's way of announcing the birth of babies on a different floor. The music also was a fitting close to his mother's life, her son said.
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