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NEWS
May 26, 1989 | By Lita Solis-Cohen, Special to The Inquirer
Twenty-two American paintings from the collection of the late Violette de Mazia, who taught art appreciation at the Barnes Foundation in Merion for 60 years, sold for $2.38 million yesterday at Christie's auction house in New York. That amount, added to the $5 million paid earlier this month for eight impressionist and modern works and $644,000 paid in April for de Mazia's furniture and furnishings, brought the proceeds from de Mazia's estate to more than $8 million. Still to be sold are a half-dozen paintings and de Mazia's house in Lower Merion.
NEWS
July 25, 1990 | By Lucinda Fleeson, Inquirer Staff Writer
Philadelphia lawyer Richard H. Glanton has been elected president of the Barnes Foundation in Merion, administrator of one of the world's most renowned collections of impressionist and postimpressionist art. Glanton, 43, served as deputy counsel to Richard Thornburgh when he was governor of Pennsylvania. He had been counsel to the foundation for the last year, a post that he resigned to become president, but will continue as general counsel to Lincoln University in Chester County.
NEWS
September 3, 2000 | By Catherine Quillman, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Aside from its priceless collection of French Impressionist paintings, the Barnes Foundation may be best known for the stringent restrictions its founder, Dr. Albert C. Barnes, placed on the collection's presentation. Before his death in a 1951 automobile accident, the pharmaceutical magnate wrote a will that stipulated how his art should be viewed and studied. Among the stipulations, the works were to remain hung in the exact floor-to-ceiling arrangement that Barnes devised when he opened the 23-room gallery adjacent to his Merion home in 1922.
NEWS
April 19, 2012 | By Stephan Salisbury, Inquirer Culture Writer
Brett Miller, 47, general counsel for the Barnes Foundation who defended the foundation's move from suburban Merion to the Benjamin Franklin Parkway in recent court hearings, was found dead at his Old City home Saturday, April 14. A spokesman for the Philadelphia Medical Examiner's Office attributed the cause of death to a self-inflicted gunshot wound. "The board of trustees and the staff of the Barnes Foundation are deeply saddened by the tragic loss of our colleague and friend Brett Miller," Derek Gillman, the director of the foundation, said in a statement to the Art Newspaper, which on Monday reported Mr. Miller's death.
NEWS
October 13, 1995 | By Leonard W. Boasberg, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
With the Barnes Foundation's "gala reopening" just a month away, the trustees have asked for an "emergency hearing" to appeal a ruling that apparently forbids them to hold the event on the foundation premises. Despite the ruling by Montgomery County Orphans Court Judge Stanley R. Ott, the foundation has proceeded with plans for the $500-to-$1,000-a-person event to be held on the grounds. The Nov. 11 gala is to celebrate the reinstallation of the world-renowned collection of art, in a building closed for more than two years for a $12 million renovation.
NEWS
October 16, 2010 | By Stephan Salisbury, Inquirer Culture Writer
In stark contrast to the lengthy and contentious battle over its move to the city, construction of the new museum and gallery for the Barnes Foundation on the Benjamin Franklin Parkway has been proceeding at a rapid clip. On Friday, construction workers were already clambering over the in-place roof of one building section - the gallery that will house the famed collection that now resides in suburban Merion. Bill McDowell, project executive, said there had been no problems with the $150 million building effort.
NEWS
April 18, 2014 | By Stephan Salisbury, Inquirer Staff Writer
Edward J. Sozanski, 77, art critic for The Inquirer, who over three decades became a major figure in describing and documenting the city's cultural transformation from regional byway to the national main stage, died suddenly Monday, April 14, in Gladwyne. The cause of death has not been determined. Whether writing about America's first sculptor, William Rush, or art from Korea's Joseon dynasty, or the way John Cage's musical "scores" looked on the page, Mr. Sozanski always sought to directly engage the art and provide his readers with an utterly independent critical judgment.
NEWS
September 25, 2002
IT HAS taken near financial ruin, but finally the trustees of the Barnes Foundation are making some sensible decisions regarding the future of the foundation and its matchless collection of paintings. Yesterday, trustees announced they are embracing an idea they once called unthinkable: moving the foundation and its collection of Renoirs, Cezannes and Matisses out of the constricting confines of Lower Merion and into Philadelphia. Trustees say the foundation's tumbling fortunes are behind their dramatic change of heart.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 19, 1995 | By Leonard W. Boasberg, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The Barnes Foundation has renewed a request to a Montgomery County court to send its celebrated show of impressionist and post-impressionist paintings to another museum. Last week, to the surprise of foes of the unprecedented tour, the foundation had withdrawn its request. But in a new petition to Judge Stanley R. Ott, the trustees said they have "an opportunity to receive substantial additional funds" to exhibit the works at "a premium art museum in Europe. " As in their previous petition, the trustees did not name the museum, the House of Art in Munich.
NEWS
June 18, 2008 | By Derrick Nunnally, Inquirer Staff Writer
The court fight over moving the Barnes Foundation's $5 billion art collection from Lower Merion Township to Philadelphia has ended with a whimper in a Norristown courthouse office. There, a Friends of the Barnes Foundation member had appeared shortly before closing time Monday with a check and appeals documents to prolong the fight. But after a last minute legal consultation on her cellphone, Evelyn Yaari of the Lower Merion-based group instead ended the years-long case. "I had to go to the clerk and say, 'I'm very sorry I asked you to do that, but actually, I'm not going to file the appeal,' " Yaari said.
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NEWS
April 18, 2014 | By Stephan Salisbury, Inquirer Staff Writer
Edward J. Sozanski, 77, art critic for The Inquirer, who over three decades became a major figure in describing and documenting the city's cultural transformation from regional byway to the national main stage, died suddenly Monday, April 14, in Gladwyne. The cause of death has not been determined. Whether writing about America's first sculptor, William Rush, or art from Korea's Joseon dynasty, or the way John Cage's musical "scores" looked on the page, Mr. Sozanski always sought to directly engage the art and provide his readers with an utterly independent critical judgment.
NEWS
April 18, 2014 | BY SHAUN BRADY, For the Daily News
AS RENOWNED AS the Barnes Foundation is for its collection of artwork by masters like Cezanne, van Gogh, and Monet, it's equally famous for the idiosyncratic way that Dr. Albert Barnes arranged his collection. The elusive connections and intuitive leaps represented on the Barnes' walls resonated with saxophonist and composer Ken Vandermark, whose own work incorporates inspirations from the entire history of jazz as well as avant-garde classical, post-punk, Ethiopian music and other styles from well outside the usual tradition.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 22, 2014 | By Natalie Pompilio, For The Inquirer
Ancient Egypt doesn't seem so far away when you're pretending to row down the Nile, following the adventures of a cheery crocodile and his best friend. Works by Renoir and Cezanne are much less intimidating if you wear pajamas and carry a stuffed bear when you're first introduced to them. Those seemingly giant suits of armor aren't so scary when you can touch them and then make your own metal designs. Many of the area's cultural institutions are making sure they're kid-friendly, offering a variety of family programs ranging from storytelling and movie watching to hands-on craft projects in the shadow of some of the world's greatest artworks.
NEWS
December 5, 2013 | By Stephan Salisbury, Inquirer Culture Writer
Derek Gillman, the British-born executive director and president of the Barnes Foundation who guided it through the latter stages of a controversial move from its longtime home in suburban Merion to a grand new gallery on the Benjamin Franklin Parkway, announced his resignation Tuesday. Gillman, 60, will become a visiting professor at Drexel University's Westphal College of Media Arts & Design, where he will teach in a new museum leadership program and in the art history department.
NEWS
November 9, 2013
Good guys vs. bad Inquirer reporter Mike Newall's fine article on a crime crackdown highlighted several wonderful public servants ("Swarming over crime," Nov. 3). They included Bryan Lentz, Edward McCann, and Caroline Keating McGlynn from the district attorney's staff; Kevin Bethel and Anthony Vega from the Police Department; and Keri Salerno on the managing director's staff. All are working creatively and with new approaches to keep Philadelphia citizens safer. Instead of doing the minimum, and cashing a paycheck every two weeks, they are putting out extra effort, and demonstrating the good and creative things that can be done by dedicated public servants.
NEWS
November 4, 2013 | By Peter Dobrin, Inquirer Culture Writer
Philadelphia has opened most of the new concert halls, theaters, and other arts spaces it set out to build in the culture boom of the past two decades. Now, who pays the piper? If this were Europe, the operating budgets of a Kimmel Center, Please Touch Museum, and Barnes Foundation would be covered largely through government subsidies. But here, we rely on philanthropy and ticket sales. And more than ever, arts groups must chase the populist (and fickle) ticket buyer while accommodating philanthropists with strongly expressed agendas.
NEWS
September 30, 2013 | By Peter Dobrin, Inquirer Culture Writer
Second of three parts, on successive Sundays. For more than a dozen years, philanthropy in Philadelphia was led by a powerful quartet. In various combinations, the Pew Charitable Trusts, William Penn Foundation, the Annenbergs, and the Lenfests lined up behind arts and culture. They built: Without them, Philadelphia might have no National Constitution Center or new, altered Barnes Foundation on the Parkway. They rescued: Had they not stepped in to cover construction debt, the Kimmel Center would have drowned in red ink. And they preserved: When The Gross Clinic , Thomas Eakins' important canvas, was on the brink of being sold off to the National Gallery of Art in Washington and an Arkansas museum backed by Wal-Mart heirs, calls were made, checks written, a deal was struck, and the painting's continued residency was assured.
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