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NEWS
May 26, 1989 | By Lita Solis-Cohen, Special to The Inquirer
Twenty-two American paintings from the collection of the late Violette de Mazia, who taught art appreciation at the Barnes Foundation in Merion for 60 years, sold for $2.38 million yesterday at Christie's auction house in New York. That amount, added to the $5 million paid earlier this month for eight impressionist and modern works and $644,000 paid in April for de Mazia's furniture and furnishings, brought the proceeds from de Mazia's estate to more than $8 million. Still to be sold are a half-dozen paintings and de Mazia's house in Lower Merion.
NEWS
July 25, 1990 | By Lucinda Fleeson, Inquirer Staff Writer
Philadelphia lawyer Richard H. Glanton has been elected president of the Barnes Foundation in Merion, administrator of one of the world's most renowned collections of impressionist and postimpressionist art. Glanton, 43, served as deputy counsel to Richard Thornburgh when he was governor of Pennsylvania. He had been counsel to the foundation for the last year, a post that he resigned to become president, but will continue as general counsel to Lincoln University in Chester County.
NEWS
September 3, 2000 | By Catherine Quillman, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Aside from its priceless collection of French Impressionist paintings, the Barnes Foundation may be best known for the stringent restrictions its founder, Dr. Albert C. Barnes, placed on the collection's presentation. Before his death in a 1951 automobile accident, the pharmaceutical magnate wrote a will that stipulated how his art should be viewed and studied. Among the stipulations, the works were to remain hung in the exact floor-to-ceiling arrangement that Barnes devised when he opened the 23-room gallery adjacent to his Merion home in 1922.
NEWS
April 19, 2012 | By Stephan Salisbury, Inquirer Culture Writer
Brett Miller, 47, general counsel for the Barnes Foundation who defended the foundation's move from suburban Merion to the Benjamin Franklin Parkway in recent court hearings, was found dead at his Old City home Saturday, April 14. A spokesman for the Philadelphia Medical Examiner's Office attributed the cause of death to a self-inflicted gunshot wound. "The board of trustees and the staff of the Barnes Foundation are deeply saddened by the tragic loss of our colleague and friend Brett Miller," Derek Gillman, the director of the foundation, said in a statement to the Art Newspaper, which on Monday reported Mr. Miller's death.
NEWS
October 13, 1995 | By Leonard W. Boasberg, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
With the Barnes Foundation's "gala reopening" just a month away, the trustees have asked for an "emergency hearing" to appeal a ruling that apparently forbids them to hold the event on the foundation premises. Despite the ruling by Montgomery County Orphans Court Judge Stanley R. Ott, the foundation has proceeded with plans for the $500-to-$1,000-a-person event to be held on the grounds. The Nov. 11 gala is to celebrate the reinstallation of the world-renowned collection of art, in a building closed for more than two years for a $12 million renovation.
NEWS
October 16, 2010 | By Stephan Salisbury, Inquirer Culture Writer
In stark contrast to the lengthy and contentious battle over its move to the city, construction of the new museum and gallery for the Barnes Foundation on the Benjamin Franklin Parkway has been proceeding at a rapid clip. On Friday, construction workers were already clambering over the in-place roof of one building section - the gallery that will house the famed collection that now resides in suburban Merion. Bill McDowell, project executive, said there had been no problems with the $150 million building effort.
NEWS
September 25, 2002
IT HAS taken near financial ruin, but finally the trustees of the Barnes Foundation are making some sensible decisions regarding the future of the foundation and its matchless collection of paintings. Yesterday, trustees announced they are embracing an idea they once called unthinkable: moving the foundation and its collection of Renoirs, Cezannes and Matisses out of the constricting confines of Lower Merion and into Philadelphia. Trustees say the foundation's tumbling fortunes are behind their dramatic change of heart.
NEWS
May 19, 2013 | By Stephan Salisbury, Inquirer Culture Writer
Without great fanfare Friday, the Barnes Foundation gallery marked its first anniversary on the Benjamin Franklin Parkway by permanently installing the famous portrait of its founder, Albert C. Barnes, at the entryway to its even more famous galleries. Barnes, as rendered in 1926 by Giorgio de Chirico, will gaze placidly and rather glumly down on visitors right before they enter the light-drenched rooms filled with the doctor's extraordinary collection of Renoirs, Cézannes, Matisses, Van Goghs, Picassos, and works by other masters of early modernism.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 19, 1995 | By Leonard W. Boasberg, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The Barnes Foundation has renewed a request to a Montgomery County court to send its celebrated show of impressionist and post-impressionist paintings to another museum. Last week, to the surprise of foes of the unprecedented tour, the foundation had withdrawn its request. But in a new petition to Judge Stanley R. Ott, the trustees said they have "an opportunity to receive substantial additional funds" to exhibit the works at "a premium art museum in Europe. " As in their previous petition, the trustees did not name the museum, the House of Art in Munich.
NEWS
June 18, 2008 | By Derrick Nunnally, Inquirer Staff Writer
The court fight over moving the Barnes Foundation's $5 billion art collection from Lower Merion Township to Philadelphia has ended with a whimper in a Norristown courthouse office. There, a Friends of the Barnes Foundation member had appeared shortly before closing time Monday with a check and appeals documents to prolong the fight. But after a last minute legal consultation on her cellphone, Evelyn Yaari of the Lower Merion-based group instead ended the years-long case. "I had to go to the clerk and say, 'I'm very sorry I asked you to do that, but actually, I'm not going to file the appeal,' " Yaari said.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
November 3, 2014 | By Stephan Salisbury, Inquirer Staff Writer
William Glackens is finally getting a proper homecoming. The Philadelphia-born painter who helped launch one of the 20th century's distinctive American art movements as well as one of the world's greatest collections of impressionist and early modernist art, is the subject of a much-anticipated full-scale museum retrospective opening Saturday at the Barnes Foundation and running through Feb. 2. "William Glackens" is the first complete assessment...
ENTERTAINMENT
October 22, 2014 | By Molly Eichel
R OB McELHENNEY is getting behind the camera to direct his first movie, and it's nothing like his TV show, "It's Always Sunny in Philadelphia. " The St. Joe's Prep grad (and booster - he regularly speaks at alumni events) will direct a children's movie. Yep, the co-creator of the wonderfully perverse "It's Always Sunny" is going the family-film route with "Figment," a "Goonies"-style adventure movie about a boy and his family whose fears come to life. So, how'd he get the gig his first time out of the gate (although, to be fair, McElhenney directed two episodes of "It's Always Sunny" in its early run)
NEWS
October 19, 2014 | By Inga Saffron, Inquirer Architecture Critic
Sometimes a single part of an architectural design can explain the whole. At Philadelphia's Barnes Foundation, the building's entire aesthetic sensibility is summed up by a humble staircase tucked off to the side of the lobby. Unlike the grand flights of steps in a big art palace, the purpose of the Barnes stairwell is more functional than ceremonial: transporting visitors from the main floor to the amenities on the lower level. But like the rest of the understated Barnes, the stairs also are packed with quiet theatrics.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 16, 2014 | By Monica Peters, For The Inquirer
Help kick off the 40th season of the Upper Darby Performing Arts Center and celebrate the 10th anniversary of the teen flick Mean Girls with Emmy award-winner Tina Fey in person. Screening begins at 7:30 p.m. Saturday. Fey, who graduated from Upper Darby High School in 1988, wrote the screenplay and starred in Mean Girls , loosely based on her experience as a student. She was also an active participant in the school's Summer Stage program. The screening will be followed by a question-and-answer session with Fey. Summer Stage is one of the longest-running children's theater programs in the nation.
NEWS
July 17, 2014 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Mark T. Smylie, 70, of Pompano Beach, Fla., formerly of Center City, a security company executive who loved ice skating and the arts, died Friday, June 27, of a heart attack. He had just finished lunch and was stricken while sitting in his car outside a Fort Lauderdale restaurant, said James D. Stoup, his former partner and present companion. For 25 years, Mr. Smylie was president of Philadelphia-based General Security Systems Inc., a security guard provider and private detection agency.
NEWS
July 16, 2014 | By Stephan Salisbury, Inquirer Staff Writer
Richard Mellon Scaife, the billionaire who died July 4, left nearly half his large art collection, a 900-acre Western Pennsylvania estate, and $15 million to the Brandywine Conservancy and Museum of Art in Chadds Ford, according to a will filed with the register of wills in Westmoreland County, southeast of Pittsburgh. Scaife, 82, known for his backing of conservative and libertarian causes, and his support of conservative think tanks such as the Heritage Foundation, was an heir to the Mellon banking and oil fortune, and publisher of the Pittsburgh Tribune-Review and other newspapers.
NEWS
July 15, 2014 | BY BETH D'ADDONO, For the Daily News
FRANCOPHILES can't always put their finger on it. Call it a certain je ne sais quoi , an undefinable yet unmistakable quality that makes all things French so enticing. Today's the 225th anniversary of the storming of the Bastille, which makes this a good time to get your French fix right here in Philadelphia, where we've loved all things French since 20-year-old Gen. Lafayette volunteered to fight on our side in the American Revolution. Let us count some ways. Forget that bowl of cherries, French painter Paul Cezanne might have said.
NEWS
June 24, 2014 | By Virginia A. Smith, Inquirer Staff Writer
Visiting the other Barnes icon - the arboretum, not the art museum - just got a whole lot easier. For the first time, the 12-acre landscape on North Latchs Lane in Merion is open to the public on weekends with none of the old constraints on visitation. No more reservations. You can just show up, pay $5 admission, as opposed to $15 when the art was there, and park free instead of shelling out another $15. More tours, more programming. You can even bring a picnic lunch. "Instead of being the place you keep people out of - which, in some ways, is part of our history - we want to be a place that welcomes you," said Margaret B. Zminda, acting director of the Barnes Foundation, which oversees the horticulture and the art that moved in 2012 to a new site on the Benjamin Franklin Parkway.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 24, 2014 | By Molly Eichel
WIRED 96.5'S Chunky has just rendered his own name irrelevant. The morning-show host has lost a whopping 219 pounds over the past year. For real. Two hundred and nineteen. Chunky essentially lost an entire person. All without ever stepping foot inside a gym. "If I walk by a window or a mirror, it'll weird me out. I still feel the same on the inside," Chunky, who wouldn't reveal his current weight because he's not done yet, told me. "Since it's been happening gradually, you never really get used to it. " Sometimes, even his co-workers don't recognize him. For the record, he's keeping his radio name.
NEWS
June 13, 2014 | By Stephan Salisbury, Inquirer Staff Writer
It may seem a little like bringing coals to Newcastle, but the small show of Cézanne still-life paintings soon to open at the Barnes Foundation is more like bringing a shiny apple to school. In fact, it's a lot like bringing many apples to school - along with a skull or two. "The World Is an Apple: The Still Lifes of Paul Cézanne" opens in the Barnes' special exhibition space on June 22 and runs through Sept. 22 before traveling to the Art Gallery of Hamilton in Ontario, where it will be a centerpiece of the gallery's 2014 centennial exhibition season.
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