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NEWS
May 26, 1989 | By Lita Solis-Cohen, Special to The Inquirer
Twenty-two American paintings from the collection of the late Violette de Mazia, who taught art appreciation at the Barnes Foundation in Merion for 60 years, sold for $2.38 million yesterday at Christie's auction house in New York. That amount, added to the $5 million paid earlier this month for eight impressionist and modern works and $644,000 paid in April for de Mazia's furniture and furnishings, brought the proceeds from de Mazia's estate to more than $8 million. Still to be sold are a half-dozen paintings and de Mazia's house in Lower Merion.
NEWS
July 25, 1990 | By Lucinda Fleeson, Inquirer Staff Writer
Philadelphia lawyer Richard H. Glanton has been elected president of the Barnes Foundation in Merion, administrator of one of the world's most renowned collections of impressionist and postimpressionist art. Glanton, 43, served as deputy counsel to Richard Thornburgh when he was governor of Pennsylvania. He had been counsel to the foundation for the last year, a post that he resigned to become president, but will continue as general counsel to Lincoln University in Chester County.
NEWS
September 3, 2000 | By Catherine Quillman, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Aside from its priceless collection of French Impressionist paintings, the Barnes Foundation may be best known for the stringent restrictions its founder, Dr. Albert C. Barnes, placed on the collection's presentation. Before his death in a 1951 automobile accident, the pharmaceutical magnate wrote a will that stipulated how his art should be viewed and studied. Among the stipulations, the works were to remain hung in the exact floor-to-ceiling arrangement that Barnes devised when he opened the 23-room gallery adjacent to his Merion home in 1922.
NEWS
January 8, 2015 | By Stephan Salisbury, INQUIRER CULTURE WRITER
The Barnes Foundation has selected Thomas Collins, head of the resurgent Pérez Art Museum in Miami, to be its new chief executive and president, the museum announced Wednesday. A native of the Philadelphia area, Collins, 46, will assume the post in March at an institution that is now in its third year on the Benjamin Franklin Parkway. He succeeds Derek Gillman, who guided the Barnes from 2006 to 2013, when the Barnes successfully, if sometimes contentiously, moved its spectacular collection of impressionist and early modernist art from its long-time home in Merion to in Philadelphia.
NEWS
April 19, 2012 | By Stephan Salisbury, Inquirer Culture Writer
Brett Miller, 47, general counsel for the Barnes Foundation who defended the foundation's move from suburban Merion to the Benjamin Franklin Parkway in recent court hearings, was found dead at his Old City home Saturday, April 14. A spokesman for the Philadelphia Medical Examiner's Office attributed the cause of death to a self-inflicted gunshot wound. "The board of trustees and the staff of the Barnes Foundation are deeply saddened by the tragic loss of our colleague and friend Brett Miller," Derek Gillman, the director of the foundation, said in a statement to the Art Newspaper, which on Monday reported Mr. Miller's death.
NEWS
October 13, 1995 | By Leonard W. Boasberg, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
With the Barnes Foundation's "gala reopening" just a month away, the trustees have asked for an "emergency hearing" to appeal a ruling that apparently forbids them to hold the event on the foundation premises. Despite the ruling by Montgomery County Orphans Court Judge Stanley R. Ott, the foundation has proceeded with plans for the $500-to-$1,000-a-person event to be held on the grounds. The Nov. 11 gala is to celebrate the reinstallation of the world-renowned collection of art, in a building closed for more than two years for a $12 million renovation.
NEWS
October 16, 2010 | By Stephan Salisbury, Inquirer Culture Writer
In stark contrast to the lengthy and contentious battle over its move to the city, construction of the new museum and gallery for the Barnes Foundation on the Benjamin Franklin Parkway has been proceeding at a rapid clip. On Friday, construction workers were already clambering over the in-place roof of one building section - the gallery that will house the famed collection that now resides in suburban Merion. Bill McDowell, project executive, said there had been no problems with the $150 million building effort.
NEWS
September 25, 2002
IT HAS taken near financial ruin, but finally the trustees of the Barnes Foundation are making some sensible decisions regarding the future of the foundation and its matchless collection of paintings. Yesterday, trustees announced they are embracing an idea they once called unthinkable: moving the foundation and its collection of Renoirs, Cezannes and Matisses out of the constricting confines of Lower Merion and into Philadelphia. Trustees say the foundation's tumbling fortunes are behind their dramatic change of heart.
NEWS
May 19, 2013 | By Stephan Salisbury, Inquirer Culture Writer
Without great fanfare Friday, the Barnes Foundation gallery marked its first anniversary on the Benjamin Franklin Parkway by permanently installing the famous portrait of its founder, Albert C. Barnes, at the entryway to its even more famous galleries. Barnes, as rendered in 1926 by Giorgio de Chirico, will gaze placidly and rather glumly down on visitors right before they enter the light-drenched rooms filled with the doctor's extraordinary collection of Renoirs, Cézannes, Matisses, Van Goghs, Picassos, and works by other masters of early modernism.
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ENTERTAINMENT
May 21, 2015 | By Elizabeth Wellington, Inquirer Fashion Writer
In a cool marriage of art, fashion, and retail, Moore College of Art and Design held its annual student fashion show Saturday night at the Barnes Foundation with Century 21 as its lead sponsor. Collections from Moore's 52 student designers featured many fun yet wearable looks that included a hot-pink trapeze coat by senior Chelsea McLay, and wide-legged slacks with windowpane details along the hem, courtesy of senior Jessica McKay. A drop-waist dress with fringed skirt from junior Claudia Geissler's resort-wear grouping made for an interesting - if not swishy - piece.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 21, 2015
The Barnes Foundation on the Parkway was the setting, and a painting from its collection - Modigliani's "Redheaded Girl in Evening Dress" - was among the inspirations for the Moore College of Art & Design's Fashion Show 2015 last weekend. Twenty-one seniors, 23 juniors and eight sophomores showed their creations.  
NEWS
May 15, 2015 | By Stephan Salisbury, Inquirer Staff Writer
With a new exhibition opening Saturday, the Barnes Foundation is entering a shadowy, self-referential, postmodern world it has never ventured into before. Certainly not during the lifetime of founder Albert C. Barnes, nor at any time since his death in 1951. "Mark Dion, Judy Pfaff, Fred Wilson: The Order of Things," running through Aug. 3, consists of three commissioned installations inspired by the famously idiosyncratic Barnes and the manner in which he displayed his art; "ensembles" he called his wall and gallery arrangements, and he stipulated they could never be rearranged.
NEWS
April 17, 2015 | By Stephan Salisbury, Inquirer Staff Writer
Ending an often testy and sometimes distant 25-year coexistence, the Barnes Foundation will merge with the foundation established by the estate of Violette de Mazia, Albert C. Barnes' longtime colleague. The Violette de Mazia Foundation - whose sole purpose has been to promulgate and support art education based on the formalist pedagogical principles of Barnes, de Mazia, and the philosopher John Dewey - will form the core of the Barnes-de Mazia Education Program, to be based at the Barnes Foundation on the Parkway.
NEWS
March 23, 2015 | BY BECKY BATCHA & LAUREN McCUTCHEON, Daily News Staff Writers batchab@phillynews.com, 215-854-5757
GENGHIS KHAN rides into town, gay rights get celebrated, "Deep Throat" (the Watergate informant, not the smut) appears in a very '70s photo show and the great painter Horace Pippin gets a great big retrospective - his first in 20 years. So stop bellyaching that there's nothing to do. Richard Avedon: Family Affairs, April 1-Aug. 2. Rare exhibit resurrects the fashion photographer's 1976 political statement - a portfolio he shot for Rolling Stone featuring 69 black-and-white portraits of that era's power elite.
NEWS
February 27, 2015 | By Peter Dobrin, Inquirer Music Critic
Four contemporary classical composers walk into an art museum. No punch line. But after walking in, this quartet of composers eventually walked away having penned four new compositions, which Network for New Music will premiere Friday at the Barnes Foundation - amid the art and spaces that inspired them. The obvious historical precedent is Mussorgsky's Pictures at an Exhibition , a vivid series of musical evocations connected by a recurring promenade. Each of Network's new pieces assumes a different form, chamber-music instrumentation, and philosophy about using the eye to tease out a translation for the ear. "Music is the most incorporeal art, and, while we all accept that it is very much like a language, it is a non-representational one," said Stephen Hartke, who produced The Blue Studio , inspired by the cobalt walls in Matisse's Studio with Goldfish , which are the same shade as his own workroom in Los Angeles.
NEWS
February 22, 2015 | By Stephan Salisbury, Inquirer Staff Writer
In a highly unusual outcome to conservation efforts, the Barnes Foundation has discovered it owns two previously unknown Cézanne sketches - even collector Albert C. Barnes was most likely unaware of their existence. The two works, unmentioned in any correspondence and not included in the master compendium of Cézanne's works, are on the backs of two watercolors that are permanently hung in the foundation's galleries on the Benjamin Franklin Parkway. The works had been taken down a year ago for needed conservation.
NEWS
February 20, 2015 | By Ellen Gray
*  ALLEGIANCE . 10 Thursdays, NBC10. NBC's "Allegiance" brings its reluctant Russian spies - and their CIA agent son - to Philadelphia Thursday. Besides including a cameo for Mayor Nutter, the show, which filmed two episodes here in October, takes viewers inside a local landmark most Philadelphians have seen only from the outside. The Masonic Temple on North Broad Street is the focus of a storyline in which the spies are racing the feds to retrieve something from City Hall on a Sunday without being detected.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 20, 2015
SO YOU THOUGHT the long-running soap opera surrounding the Barnes Foundation and its priceless collection of paintings by Renoir, Matisse, Cezanne, Picasso and others was finally over, right? Guess again. In an apparent effort to get the last word in the bitter feud that pitted those who wanted to bring the gallery to Philadelphia (including Daily News publisher Gerry Lenfest) and those who wanted it to remain in Lower Merion, the Barnes Foundation has commissioned a documentary giving its side of the story.
NEWS
January 19, 2015 | By Virginia A. Smith, Inquirer Staff Writer
It's a given in the gardening world that wintertime is for resting, recharging, and reimagining our next - and best - garden ever. But, increasingly, the off-season is for learning. The Philadelphia region, which immodestly but accurately touts itself as "America's garden capital," with 30 public gardens, arboretums and historic landscapes within 30 miles of the city, offers scores of classes, workshops and programs to keep you in the game till spring. You can find the whole collection at www.americasgardencapital.org . On Jan. 24, for example, a panel of Barnes Arboretum School graduates will present an hourlong program on careers in horticulture at the Barnes Foundation on the Benjamin Franklin Parkway.
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