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Barney Frank

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NEWS
December 8, 2009 | By Thomas Fitzgerald INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Liberal Democratic Rep. Barney Frank of Massachusetts endorsed Rep. Joe Sestak's primary challenge to Sen. Arlen Specter yesterday, becoming the first member of Congress to back the insurgent Pennsylvania candidate. Specter, a 28-year senator who became a Democrat in April, has the support of President Obama, Gov. Rendell, and national and state party leaders in his bid for a sixth term. Frank, chairman of the House Financial Services Committee, called Sestak a "true Democrat" and said he valued Sestak's leadership on economic and military issues.
NEWS
September 23, 1989 | By ELLEN GOODMAN
This is what it must have been like to be in Jim Wright's district, or in Tony Coelho's. The scandal this time is starring Barney Frank, the guy from your own district, the Fourth District of Massachusetts. The story breaks like an accident report, a political sea disaster. Steve Gobie, a hooker at the helm, opens up a leak the size of the hole in the Valdez and pours oil, 100 percent crude, over Barney Frank's reputation. Frank had hired the prostitute. The prostitute had used Frank's apartment to ply his trade.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 22, 2012
Conan (11 p.m., TBS) - Actress Jennifer Aniston; comic Jay Larson; Ron and Amy Shirley. Late Show With David Letterman (11:35 p.m., CBS3) - Paul Rudd; John Witherspoon; Heartless Bastards. The Tonight Show With Jay Leno (11:35 p.m., NBC10) - Tim Allen; Rocket City Rednecks; Jessie Baylin. Jimmy Kimmel Live (Midnight, 6ABC) - Jessica Alba; Rep. Barney Frank; Nathan Myhrvold; Tower of Power performs.
NEWS
September 4, 1989 | By JEFF GREENFIELD
Whenever a discussion over the private lives of public figures has come up, I have pointed to Rep. Barney Frank (D., Mass.) as an example of the virtue of full disclosure. A powerful public figure with a private life he or she tried to keep secret is a tempting target for blackmail, I'd argue - much to the distress of some readers whose maximum volubility and minimal literacy led them to conclude that I aspired to be the Torquemada of my generation. But look at Barney Frank, I'd say. When he acknowledged his homosexuality, he rendered himself immune to the threat of blackmail; he could hold any job in the country.
NEWS
July 27, 1990 | BY SANDY GRADY
They bellowed and snarled at each other. Eyeballs bulged, necks turned red. They shouted such epithets as "garbage" and "homophobic. " Decorum went to hell when sex came out of the closet in the House of Representatives. If such ghosts as Daniel Webster, Henry Clay or John Calhoun had returned, those 19th-century giants would have gaped in astonishment at the bedlam. But in their era of mutton-chop sideburns, brass spittoons and morning coats, gentlemen did not publicly wrangle over sexual preferences.
NEWS
February 10, 1995 | by Bob Bauman, New York Times
Until Rep. Dick Armey referred to Barney Frank as "Barney Fag," I had a good impression of the new majority leader. Compared to the doctrinaire speaker of the House, Newt Gingrich, Armey seemed a thoughtful if somewhat laconic sort, carefully choosing his words to convey his considered beliefs. Armey protested that his comment was merely a slip of the tongue, a mispronunciation requiring no "psychoanalysis about my subliminal or about my Freudian predilections. " Those are carefully chosen words, but I, as a gay man, shudder to think that anyone was convinced by them.
NEWS
June 11, 1989 | By Carl M. Cannon, Inquirer Washington Bureau
Two years ago, when Rep. Barney Frank decided to acknowledge his homosexuality, he assumed some Republicans would try to use it against him and his party. He wasn't wrong. Suddenly, Frank, a Massachusetts Democrat, became a favorite target of Republicans. Usually they were content to call him an "ultraliberal. " But not always. Three months ago, Rep. Chuck Douglas (R., N.H.), speaking from six weeks' experience in the House, used Frank's sexual preference as a way of ridiculing the Democratic-controlled House Judiciary Committee.
NEWS
September 26, 1989 | BY DONALD KAUL
So the Democratic party is afraid it's being shamed by Barney Frank; and worse than that, Congress too. House Minority leader Robert Michel says Frank's problems are "becoming a stain upon the House of Representatives. " There are those, some of them liberals speaking more in sorrow than in anger, who are suggesting that Frank resign his seat in the House. Gimme a break. Frank is a brilliant, articulate, very funny liberal congressman from Massachusetts who, about two years ago, announced to the world he was a homosexual, a revelation which did not prevent him from being returned to office by his blue-collar, Roman Catholic district by a healthy margin.
NEWS
July 21, 1990 | By David Hess, Inquirer Washington Bureau The Associated Press contributed to this article
The House ethics committee yesterday announced its recommendation that Rep. Barney Frank (D., Mass.) be reprimanded, making him the latest lawmaker to face discipline by a Congress increasingly intent on cleaning up the behavior of its members. The panel unanimously recommended that Frank, an acknowledged homosexual, be reprimanded for actions he took on behalf of male prostitute Stephen L. Gobie. Rep. Julian C. Dixon (D., Calif.), chairman of the ethics panel, said the 12-member committee voted unanimously to recommend that Frank be reprimanded on allegations that he fixed 33 parking tickets for Gobie with District of Columbia authorities and that he misled a Virginia state's attorney in a memo seeking favorable treatment for Gobie in a probation proceeding.
NEWS
October 4, 1989 | By Norman Ornstein, From the New York Times
When I arrived at my office that day, I had more than a dozen messages on my desk from television, newspaper and magazine reporters. Every call was about Barney Frank. In what apparently passes for investigative journalism these days, each reporter started by telling me he or she had spent the morning watching "Geraldo," in which prostitute Steve Gobie recounted his adventures with Congressman Frank. All had been told to do a story that day about the continuing Frank saga, geared to the "Geraldo" episode and the cover story on Frank in Newsweek, doing its best imitation of The National Enquirer.
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NEWS
July 28, 2016 | BY JOSEPH JAAFARI, STAFF WRITER
Former Massachusetts Congressman Barney Frank gave a scathing speech at the Democratic National Convention's LGBT Caucus Tuesday afternoon, aimed at "Bernie or Bust"-ers who vowed to not vote for Hillary Clinton if she becomes the Democratic nominee. Frank, who was one of the first openly gay persons to be voted into Congress, said he believed it was his and other Democrats' "special mission" to convince Sanders supporters to vote for Clinton, adding that Sanders loyalists were willing to do harm to the LGBT community for their own "superior moral political position.
NEWS
May 3, 2013 | By John Timpane, Inquirer Staff Writer
At the 21st annual Equality Forum Summit, you'll hear talk of how much is changing nationwide for the lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender (LGBT) community - and how little is changing in Pennsylvania state law. That's the irony surrounding the summit, one of the nation's foremost LGBT gatherings. It started Wednesday and runs through Sunday at locations throughout the city, with 18 panels, an art exhibition, special guests, a four-man production of Romeo and Juliet , and some great parties.
NEWS
May 1, 2013 | By Craig Snyder
On the airwaves, in the streets, and on social media sites, the world is filled with the noise of nasty discourse. We are assaulted by bitter diatribes that rarely prompt anyone to consider content, much less change opinions. Our country stands to lose the ability to civilly exchange divergent opinions. I have recently returned to Philadelphia as president and CEO of the World Affairs Council, where I started my first job out of college 30 years ago. Now, as then, the mission of the council is strictly nonpartisan.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 22, 2012
Conan (11 p.m., TBS) - Actress Jennifer Aniston; comic Jay Larson; Ron and Amy Shirley. Late Show With David Letterman (11:35 p.m., CBS3) - Paul Rudd; John Witherspoon; Heartless Bastards. The Tonight Show With Jay Leno (11:35 p.m., NBC10) - Tim Allen; Rocket City Rednecks; Jessie Baylin. Jimmy Kimmel Live (Midnight, 6ABC) - Jessica Alba; Rep. Barney Frank; Nathan Myhrvold; Tower of Power performs.
NEWS
December 5, 2011
Financial-sector interests trying to block the stricter rules needed to protect the public from their avarice likely danced a little jig at the news that their ace nemesis, Barney Frank, was retiring. Without the Democratic representative from Massachusetts around, they believe it will be easier for them to repeal or dilute the law he coauthored to rein in the type of money-lending excesses that helped send the nation into recession. They must not succeed. With only a fraction of the Dodd-Frank rules in effect, Wall Street firms are already reverting to their old ways.
NEWS
December 1, 2011
The morning after his retirement announcement this week, Rep. Barney Frank scored an interview on NBC's Today show, and an opportunity to act as an elder statesman in front of a TV audience of millions. Instead, the Massachusetts Democrat chose to quarrel with the interviewer. "You said that your district has been redrawn in a way that would make it more difficult for you to win reelection," host Savannah Guthrie said. "I didn't say I wasn't running because I was afraid I couldn't win," Frank retorted.
BUSINESS
July 30, 2010 | By Joseph N. DiStefano, Inquirer Staff Writer
Internet poker and other online gambling could soon go from being mostly banned in the United States to being legal, licensed, taxed - and casino-controlled. Thank powerful Rep. Barney Frank (D., Mass.) , who pushed H.R. 2267 through in a bipartisan 41-22 vote in his House banking committee Wednesday evening. Frank's allies in the Democratic leadership are likely to slip the bill through Congress by tacking it onto some "must-pass" legislation as an amendment, rather than subject to straight Senate and House votes that some members might find embarrassing, according to FBR Capital Markets Corp.
NEWS
December 8, 2009 | By Thomas Fitzgerald INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Liberal Democratic Rep. Barney Frank of Massachusetts endorsed Rep. Joe Sestak's primary challenge to Sen. Arlen Specter yesterday, becoming the first member of Congress to back the insurgent Pennsylvania candidate. Specter, a 28-year senator who became a Democrat in April, has the support of President Obama, Gov. Rendell, and national and state party leaders in his bid for a sixth term. Frank, chairman of the House Financial Services Committee, called Sestak a "true Democrat" and said he valued Sestak's leadership on economic and military issues.
BUSINESS
June 20, 2009 | By Alan J. Heavens INQUIRER REAL ESTATE WRITER
As one of the lawmakers on Capitol Hill with responsibility for navigating the country out of the housing crisis, Rep. Barney Frank is a force to be reckoned with. So when the Massachusetts Democrat, chairman of the House Financial Services Committee, announces that "the notion of homeownership as the goal universally is greatly flawed," and that an adequate supply of affordable rental housing might have prevented the subprime-mortgage debacle, it well may signal a sea change in the way Americans look at housing once the economy recovers.
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