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NEWS
September 2, 2010
IT WAS the midpoint in the era when teeming masses, yearning to breathe free, arrived on our shores - and were on their own to find their way in a new land. Jacob and Rose Bain arrived from Romania in 1905, two of 12 million immigrants who arrived at and passed through Ellis Island. Papers in hand, they made their way to South Philadelphia, which had a sizable Jewish community. Why South Philly? In a voice barely above a whisper, Jeff Jolles, 67, the Bains' great-grandson, says that they had some family there.
NEWS
February 2, 2006 | By Kevin G. Hall INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
One day after President Bush vowed to reduce America's dependence on Middle East oil by cutting imports from there 75 percent by 2025, his energy secretary and national economic adviser said the President did not mean it literally. What the President meant, they said in a conference call with reporters, was that alternative fuels could displace an amount of oil imports equivalent to most of what America is expected to import from the Middle East in 2025. But America still would import oil from the Middle East, because that is where the greatest oil supplies are. The reference in the President's State of the Union address to Mideast oil made headlines nationwide yesterday because of his assertion that "America is addicted to oil" and his call to "break this addiction.
NEWS
July 13, 1986 | By Paul Magnusson, Inquirer Washington Bureau
At twilight, six-pound bass jump from the shallow waters, snowy egrets pick their way nimbly through the swamp grass looking for frogs, quail roost quietly among the reeds, black bear and alligator roam. Thousands of feet beneath them lies $1 billion worth of crude oil stored in massive salt caverns, part of America's total stash of 500 million barrels. The oil that lies here and in five other heavily guarded sites along the Gulf Coast in Louisiana and Texas is America's hedge against future oil embargoes, shortages and foreign policy extortion by hostile oil-producing Middle East nations.
NEWS
April 8, 1986 | By David Osterfeld (David Osterfeld is a professor and fellow of the Institute for Humane Studies at George Mason University, Fairfax, Va.)
The price of oil has fallen from $29 a barrel in November 1985 to $13 in March 1986, a drop of over 50 percent in four months. We are now in the midst of a worldwide oil glut. But how is this possible? After all, in the 1970s we were told that oil is a nonrenewable resource that was on the verge of depletion. Oil could only become more scarce. A glut was not only unthinkable but also logically impossible. But the "impossible" has occurred. How? The doomsday predictions were based on a "worst case" scenario.
BUSINESS
August 21, 1990 | From Inquirer Wire Services
OPEC refused yesterday to schedule an emergency session to consider increasing oil production to alleviate the shortage caused by the Mideast crisis, but Saudi Arabia and Venezuela appeared ready to lead such a meeting anyway. The dispute unsettled world oil markets, with prices mostly finishing higher. In Caracas, Venezuelan President Carlos Andres Perez said a consulting group within OPEC would meet if the full 13-nation cartel did not agree to a session. "Venezuela will increase its production when there is an accord within OPEC because we are committed to attending (to)
BUSINESS
February 18, 1988 | The Inquirer Staff
A Teamsters spokesman yesterday said that the union would launch a worldwide strike against Pan Am Corp. on Sunday, but the troubled carrier pledged to remain "fully operational" if the 4,500 union members walk out. Frank Bertucelli, business representative for Local 732 of the Teamsters' Airline Division, said the Teamsters will walk off the job at 12:01 a.m. EST Sunday, the end of a federally mandated 30-day cooling-off period in the union's dispute...
NEWS
September 6, 2012 | By Andrew Maykuth, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Who knew that the economic solution for the region's beleaguered oil refineries would arrive on a slow train from North Dakota? Delta Air Lines, the new owner of the Trainer refinery that is scheduled to reopen later this month, on Thursday became the third fuel producer in the Philadelphia area to announce plans to bring in crude oil by rail from the Bakken oil field in the upper Midwest. Edward Bastian, the airline's president, told an investor conference in New York that Delta plans to replace some imported oil at Trainer with domestic crude brought in by rail.
BUSINESS
September 7, 2011 | By Mike Armstrong, Inquirer Columnist
A year ago, I took a boat ride up the Schuylkill to the Fairmount Water Works. To reach that elegant, neoclassical structure below the Philadelphia Museum of Art, you must first pass a sprawling South Philadelphia complex that was designed to quench a different thirst for a once rapidly industrializing nation. On that summer day, the sounds, smells, and flashes emanating from the metal city that is Sunoco Inc.'s refinery overwhelmed the quietude of the trees and greenery that line much of the river's western bank.
NEWS
November 30, 2010
THE FREE-enterprise system is broken. Stupidity reigns. What's the root of today's economic distress? Does it have anything to do with the financial recklesness of Wall Street and our banking system bringing the economy to its knees? Certainly! Warren Buffet described the "financial weapons of mass destruction. " You make loans on the borrowers ability to repay, not on Wall Street repackaging them and passing the risk of default on to someone else. But the real prime mover of today's financial mess is rooted in the oil condition of the country.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 16, 2006 | By Steve Klinge FOR THE INQUIRER
When you pilfer your band's name from a children's book about a mouse and then write bouncy, call-and-response songs that feature a tap dancer instead of a drummer, you run the risk of becoming a novelty act. Remarkably, Tilly and the Wall manage to avoid that problem while retaining their exuberant essence on the new Bottoms of Barrels. To its basic lineup of folk-pop guitar, thrift-store keyboards, amplified taps, and gang girl-boy vocals, the Omaha quintet fleshes out songs such as the flamenco-style "Bad Education" and the roller-rink rockin' "Urgency" with bass, drums, strings and/or horns.
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