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Barrier Island

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NEWS
July 9, 2012 | By Jacqueline L. Urgo, Inquirer Staff Writer
LITTLE BEACH ISLAND, N.J. - Unlike other Jersey Shore barrier islands that have evolved into hometowns and tourist destinations, Little Beach Island is an enigma. "I've often sat and wondered about what kind of a place Little Beach Island would have become had it been developed," said Steven Howard, who has studied the ebb and flow of what is believed to be the last sizable uninhabited barrier island on the Atlantic coast, between Long Beach Island and Brigantine. "What would be its place among all the other [New Jersey]
NEWS
July 14, 2001 | By Gilbert M. Gaul and Anthony R. Wood INQUIRER STAFF WRITERS
As a teenager in the '50s, Roy Kampmeyer would do almost anything to spend a weekend at the beach. When a girl he was dating mentioned that her family owned a house on a narrow strip of barrier island between Strathmere and Sea Isle City, Kampmeyer replied, "How nice," and began to visit. Kampmeyer later married the girl, and decades later, the Lansdale couple are still happily together. But the modest Shore house that once stood on wooden stilts overlooking the Atlantic Ocean is long gone.
TRAVEL
March 24, 2014 | By Melissa Komar, For The Inquirer
When my husband and I determined that staying in the country was the most logical option for our fall 2013 honeymoon, Ocracoke Island, N.C., was always the top contender on our list of possible locations. One of the least-visited and least-populated barrier islands of the Outer Banks and part of the Cape Hatteras National Seashore, Ocracoke is just over an eight-hour drive from our home in Philadelphia and has several rental cottages available. Summer weather lasts well into October, and with several access points for pedestrians and vehicles, beach space is plentiful.
NEWS
March 1, 1995 | By Jacqueline L. Urgo, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
A bid received yesterday of $1.68 million to replenish this resort's long- neglected south-end beaches could mark the start of a nationally significant project. The project would place 500,000 cubic yards of sand on 142 acres of public beach, between 34th and 59th Streets. If state and local officials agree the price is right, Ocean City would become the only barrier island in the United States to have its beachfront completely renourished. And that is significant because it would give officials the truest reading of how beaches can benefit from such projects over the long term, according to Michael Bruno, director of the New Jersey Coastal Protection Technical Assistance Service at Stevens Institute of Technology in Hoboken.
NEWS
July 14, 2010 | By Sam Wood, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Lifeguards closed a beach in Ocean County this morning after surfers spotted sharks in the water. Two five-foot sharks swam off Seaside Park shoreline for several hours, said lifeguard captain Joe Gomulka. Swimmers were allowed back in the water about 12:30 p.m. after the sharks moved north, he said. "We're still trying to figure out what kind of sharks they were," Gomulka said. The beaches will be open Thursday, he said. On Monday the sharks were spotted off Ocean Beach north of Seaside Park, forcing lifeguards to close that beach for about a half hour, said Chief Michael G. Mastronardy of the Toms River police.
NEWS
July 15, 2010
Lifeguards closed a beach in Ocean County, N.J., Wednesday morning after surfers spotted sharks in the water. Two five-foot sharks swam off Seaside Park for several hours, lifeguard captain Joe Gomulka said. Swimmers were allowed back into the water about 12:30 p.m., after the sharks moved north, he said. "We're still trying to figure out what kind of sharks they were," Gomulka said. The beaches will be open Thursday, he said. On Monday the sharks were spotted off Ocean Beach, north of Seaside Park, forcing lifeguards to close that beach for about 30 minutes, Toms River Police Chief Michael G. Mastronardy said.
NEWS
May 25, 2011
Edward H. Harte, 88, a prominent Texas newspaper executive and ardent conservationist who played an important role in preserving tracts of open space and stretches of seashore in his state, died last Wednesday at a retirement home in Scarborough, Maine. He also lived in Corpus Christi. He was a son of Houston Harte, a cofounder, with Bernard Hanks, of Harte-Hanks Newspapers, which for many years was a significant player in the Texas newspaper market. The chain, which was started in 1920, eventually owned more than 30 dailies and dozens of weeklies around the country.
NEWS
November 1, 2012 | By Frank Kummer and Aubrey Whelan, Breaking News Desk
Emergency crews are reportedly having trouble reaching multiple house fires at an Ocean County shore town said to be ignited by ruptured gas lines. The fires were reported this morning, and confirmed through Ocean County Dispatch and fire personnel. Video obtained by the Associated Press shows what appeared to be eight to 10 separate fires burning at the same time, with some clearly igniting houses. It's unclear whether the blazes were in Brick, or Mantoloking, a very wealthy beach community.
NEWS
November 1, 2012 | By James Osborne, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
It will be at least a week before residents are allowed to return to Long Beach Island, Mayor Joseph Mancini of Long Beach Township said Wednesday. The 18-mile-long barrier island was among the hardest hit by superstorm Sandy, which ravaged the east coast this week. Whole neighborhoods were swamped with sand and lavish beachfront houses were left gutted, their appliances cast across the streets. "It's carnage," the mayor said. "There's no water, sewer or power. Anyone who's still here, we're encouraging to leave now. " Of the approximately 10,000 people who live on the island outside of the summer months, about 1,000 remain, Mancini said.
NEWS
August 6, 2012 | By Kevin Riordan, Inquirer Columnist
In the little barrier island town of Strathmere, the beach and boat ramp are free, and so is the parking. What this quirky and easygoing Cape May County community - think Mayberry with a splash of Margaritaville - dearly wants to be free of, however, is Upper Township. A New Jersey appellate court panel dealt yet another defeat Wednesday to supporters of the grassroots "de-annexation" effort launched in 2007. The judges affirmed previous rulings that losing Strathmere - and its $393 million in taxable real estate - would hurt Upper Township, fiscally and otherwise.
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TRAVEL
March 24, 2014 | By Melissa Komar, For The Inquirer
When my husband and I determined that staying in the country was the most logical option for our fall 2013 honeymoon, Ocracoke Island, N.C., was always the top contender on our list of possible locations. One of the least-visited and least-populated barrier islands of the Outer Banks and part of the Cape Hatteras National Seashore, Ocracoke is just over an eight-hour drive from our home in Philadelphia and has several rental cottages available. Summer weather lasts well into October, and with several access points for pedestrians and vehicles, beach space is plentiful.
NEWS
July 8, 2013 | By Frank Eltman, Associated Press
CHERRY GROVE, N.Y. - Decades before the 1969 Stonewall riots in New York City, lesbians and gay men were living freely and openly in a place called Cherry Grove. The seaside resort on Fire Island, about 60 miles east of Manhattan, was known as far back as the late 1940s as a sanctuary where gay writers, actors and businesspeople from the city and beyond escaped to relax, hold hands and show affection. "It's probably one of the earliest examples of don't ask, don't tell," Carl Luss said after learning in June that the Cherry Grove Community House and Theater, opened in 1948, added to the National Register of Historic Places.
NEWS
June 16, 2013 | By Andrew Seidman, Inquirer Staff Writer
LONG BEACH, N.J. - Cars were submerged in three feet of sand. Six feet of water added insult to injury. Then, nine days later, snow blanketed the town. Those are some of the lasting images of the Sandy-battered Shore for first responders in this barrier island town. On Saturday, some of them saw for the first time an island transformed, nearly returned to its old self. Seven months after Sandy made landfall, hitting North Jersey and New York the hardest but also causing significant damage to southern Shore towns like this one, Mayor Joseph Mancini and other locals thanked hundreds of first responders Saturday for their efforts.
NEWS
April 15, 2013 | By Andrew Maykuth, Inquirer Staff Writer
WALL TOWNSHIP, N.J. - In the days immediately after Hurricane Sandy struck on Oct. 29, repair crews from New Jersey Natural Gas frantically attempted to fix the utility's broken distribution system on the devastated barrier islands. The effort proved futile. The scale of the damage was stunning. Hundreds of homes had shifted on their foundations, jerking gas lines loose. Some wrecked homes burned, fed by broken gas lines. A major 12-inch gas main, formerly buried beneath Route 35, was fully exposed where the storm had breached the narrow barrier island at Mantoloking.
NEWS
November 22, 2012 | By James Osborne, Inquirer Staff Writer
MANAHAWKIN, N.J. - In what seems another life now, Mark Rahn was on the phone with his ex-wife, getting a lecture about the need to get off the barrier island town of Seaside Heights before Sandy hit the coast. "I was going to throw a hurricane party," Rahn, 54, recalled Tuesday. So began a three-week odyssey that took Rahn through three storm shelters and a seemingly endless series of conversations with federal disaster officials as he tried to verify that he, and not a woman he briefly allowed to stay in his apartment, was entitled to the federal assistance she subsequently claimed.
NEWS
November 1, 2012 | By Frank Kummer and Aubrey Whelan, Breaking News Desk
Emergency crews are reportedly having trouble reaching multiple house fires at an Ocean County shore town said to be ignited by ruptured gas lines. The fires were reported this morning, and confirmed through Ocean County Dispatch and fire personnel. Video obtained by the Associated Press shows what appeared to be eight to 10 separate fires burning at the same time, with some clearly igniting houses. It's unclear whether the blazes were in Brick, or Mantoloking, a very wealthy beach community.
NEWS
November 1, 2012 | By James Osborne and Aubrey Whelan, INQUIRER STAFF WRITERS
Two days after Sandy sent the ocean surging across Long Beach Island, those who stayed behind looked out over the wreckage in shock. Sylvia Sorino, a waitress at a hotel, went back to the ground-floor apartment she shared with her boyfriend and wept. "Look at this place. All this stuff is wrecked. Our whole lives are in here, and it's gone. We don't have insurance," the 53-year-old said Wednesday. "I ran out of here with the clothes on my back. " In the aftermath of the storm, authorities and residents alike tried to come to grips with a scene unlike any they had ever seen.
NEWS
November 1, 2012 | By James Osborne, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
It will be at least a week before residents are allowed to return to Long Beach Island, Mayor Joseph Mancini of Long Beach Township said Wednesday. The 18-mile-long barrier island was among the hardest hit by superstorm Sandy, which ravaged the east coast this week. Whole neighborhoods were swamped with sand and lavish beachfront houses were left gutted, their appliances cast across the streets. "It's carnage," the mayor said. "There's no water, sewer or power. Anyone who's still here, we're encouraging to leave now. " Of the approximately 10,000 people who live on the island outside of the summer months, about 1,000 remain, Mancini said.
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