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Barry Morrison

NEWS
October 23, 1998 | BY BARRY MORRISON AND GERRIE S. GREENE
We take issue with your editorial (Oct. 13) questioning the need for hate-crimes legislation. Hate-crimes statutes are vitally important - to the victim and to the community, and as a deterrent. The murder of Matthew Shepard underscores the need for protection based on sexual orientation. The Anti-Defamation League has been a pioneer in drafting and promoting hate crimes laws. Forty states - including Pennsylvania - have enacted statutes based on or similar to ADL model legislation.
NEWS
March 1, 1997 | By Lea Sitton Stanley and Jere Downs, INQUIRER STAFF WRITERS
Authorities are looking into anti-Semitic vandalism at a day-care center in South Philadelphia. On Sunday, a swastika was painted on the door of the Downtown Children's Center, which is run by Federation Day Care Services, Kevin Vaughan of the city Human Relations Commission said yesterday. He declined to provide details, but said no similar incidents had been reported in the neighborhood. A pamphlet carrying the name Hitler Free Corps was left in the door handle, said Barry Morrison, regional director of the Anti-Defamation League of B'Nai B'Rith.
NEWS
November 6, 1996 | By Mary Anne Janco, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
They came about 50 strong - ministers, parents, teenagers, community leaders and concerned residents - to take a stand against hate activity in their town. "We are determined to help control the streets of our community by every legal means possible," Mary Edwards said at the town meeting she convened Monday night at the Media Friends School. On Oct. 12, five men - at least three of whom have ties to white supremacy groups - were jailed in connection with the beating of a 23-year-old borough man. The victim and the attackers were white.
NEWS
March 15, 2012
When someone keeps commiting offensive acts, but apologizes afterward each time, is he really sorry? That question arises in the case of Philadelphia-based Urban Outfitters, which again is selling apparel that offends a particular segment of American society. This time, again, it's Irish Americans, who are stereotypically depicted on T-shirts and other items Urban Outfitters hopes to sell to St. Patrick's Day revelers. It's a shame that an event that for the better part of 1,000 years was observed solely as a religious holiday that began in Ireland has become for too many people little more that an excuse for bawdy behavior.
NEWS
January 23, 2001 | By Barry Morrison
Today, the Anti-Defamation League - joined by Philadelphia Newspapers Inc. (publishers of the Daily News and the Inquirer), WPVI-TV and the Free Library of Philadelphia - launches an ambitious six-month anti-prejudice campaign: No Place for Hate. In the absence of a catastrophic triggering event or alarming statistics, some have asked, "Why bother?" The answers to that question are three: First, hate is a constant. It is part of human nature, so we have to wrestle with it all the time.
NEWS
January 31, 2003 | By Dan Hardy INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Peace, or at least a truce and the framework for a peace agreement, appears to be at hand between the Akiba Hebrew Academy and the Phelps School, after allegations of anti-Semitism poisoned their sports rivalry. Yesterday, two weeks after an Akiba basketball player was punched in the mouth by a Phelps student, the heads of both schools, their athletic directors, and representatives of the Anti-Defamation League, a Jewish civil rights organization, hammered out a plan for forging a better relationship.
NEWS
April 21, 1999 | by April Adamson, Daily News Staff Writer
He was born 110 years ago yesterday - but he lives on. He lives on in boys who can quote his hateful words and scrawl his dreaded swastikas. He lives on in grown men who talk of racial war and delight in slurring hardworking Americans who happen not to be like them. Yesterday, on April 20, the anniversary of his birth, Adolf Hitler may have been living on at a high school just outside Denver where a pair of Nazi-loving students used semi-automatic weapons to mow down dozens of classmates in a lunchtime massacre.
NEWS
September 12, 1996 | By Rachel Smolkin, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
At the corner of Third and Market Streets, no one seemed to be talking late yesterday afternoon about the pro-Nazi fliers that had littered residents' lawns and sidewalks the previous night. "I haven't heard anything about it," said Brenda Butt, who works at the Oxford Florist. "And we usually hear everything here. " But police say fliers with such slogans as "White Man Fight Back!" and "Heil Hitler!" have been distributed in the borough over the last two days, and possibly throughout the week.
NEWS
October 10, 1998 | by Myung Oak Kim, Daily News Staff Writer
They came from all over the country, community leaders and professionals, looking for ways to stop hate crimes by young people. The two-day conference that ended yesterday in University City was especially timely for the handful of attendees from York County. Four teen-agers from the town of Dover were arrested last week for allegedly plotting to gun down Jewish and black students at their high school. The boys, aged 16 to 19, were arrested after school officials learned of the alleged plot from students who overheard them talking at a bus stop.
NEWS
April 1, 1993 | By Beverly M. Payton, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Newtown Hadassah members had their own stories to tell during a talk by an official of the Anti-Defamation League. One woman said her daughter, a fourth-grade student in the Pennsbury School District, found a swastika scrawled in her math book. Another woman said a cashier in a fast-food restaurant remarked, "You must be a Jew" when she ordered a cola with no ice and extra cheese with her meal. A third woman said she felt like an outsider when a religious leader prayed in the name of Jesus Christ during opening ceremonies of an Upper Makefield Little League game.
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